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Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #901939
12/16/16 11:10 AM
12/16/16 11:10 AM
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I'm not sure whether New York still wants to be involved in that powder keg (as Nicaso ones eloquently put it). If the Violis are the instigators, they're able to be so because New York has washed their hands of the city. And they don't have the manpower to take over Montreal themselves and so they have to resort to making alliances with players from within the city, which is obviously the case.


"It was between the brothers Kay -- I had nothing to do with it."
Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: Sonny_Black] #901949
12/16/16 12:58 PM
12/16/16 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
In the late 1970s or even the 80s the New York families weren't that much in decline yet and still very powerful. Their real decline started in the 90s. However, for the Bonannos the 90s were a good time and it wasn't until their entire administration flipped that everything fell apart. Montagna's status meant enough for people to align with him. However Desjardins himself didn't have much to do with the Bonannos at that point and neither did his guys which is why they didn't care for him to be the leader, and when Montagna tried to take out Desjardins it was simply kill or be killed.


You're correct, the American Mafia was still powerful in the 70s/80s but it was in a steady decline. The truth is the American LCN was at its highest peak from the 30s to the 50s, they ran the syndicate like an oiled machine and no other Italian Mob group around the world compared. Then you had significant turning points such as the Apalachin meeting and the Valachi testimony, both of these events were the beginning of the decline. American LE started to catch up and with each decade, their power and influence decreased.

When the American Mafia was at its might, the Mob groups in Italy were very peasant like. That all changed when the Sicilians got their act together and created their own commission in the late 50s. Ironically, it was the Americans that helped them create it and Joe Bonnano of all people was one of the main organizers, from then on (Until they decided to act stupid and take on the Italian government) the Sicilians were on the rise which eventually played into the favor of the Rizzuto family later on.

During the 70s/80s the Montreal Mob was still very much so under the Bonnanos, by the 90s I would argue that they were under the Bonnano banner by name only but were independent and acted as such, they did kick up to them but I feel it was out of respect for Gerlando Sciascia since he was very close to Vito. Once Sciascia was gone, that was the end of it as it was clear that no more envelopes were being sent. Vitale was apparently sent to Montreal to make Vito a capo around 2001, he was received with respect and all but Vito declined the offer, that was a clear message to the Bonnanos that just in case they did not understand the memo back in 1999 (No more envelopes), this offer refusal should make it very clear that their time in Montreal was done.

As for Montagna's status, it was enough to get him a hello and an invitation to the club, but certainly not enough to make him the main power player. If he was gonna play, he should have just chosen a side and stuck with it to the end, instead he approached this as a Bonnano and acted like he wanted to bring them under the Bonnano order. This is why he approached Nicolo Rizzuto first and asked him to step down, when Nick Sr declined, Sal decided to team up with the opposition. He joined up with Desjardins and the other Cotroni loyalists, he also made trips to Hamilton to meet with the Luppino family (Violi brothers). It seems like his Bonnano status got the best of him because he thought he could just get rid of Desjardins and take control of the Cotroni guys, he did not realize that these guys don't care whether you're made or not, they were loyal to their own guys. Desjardins was the brother in law of Joe Di Maulo, he was also very connected to the Hells Angels and had significant power in the city of Montreal, Montagna's support was no where close to such in the city and the fact that there was no retribution made should be clear evidence that the group cared very little for him.

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
I'm not sure whether New York still wants to be involved in that powder keg (as Nicaso ones eloquently put it). If the Violis are the instigators, they're able to be so because New York has washed their hands of the city. And they don't have the manpower to take over Montreal themselves and so they have to resort to making alliances with players from within the city, which is obviously the case.


The Violis are not exactly trying to take over Montreal, their base is in Hamilton and I believe they'll continue to advance their power there. They're just heavily involved in taking out the Rizzutos and replacing them with the Cotroni faction. After all not only was their dad killed by the Rizzutos, he was also a top Cotroni guy. Their recent meeting with Frank Cotroni's son along with other signs are an indication of their heavy involvement, it's also obvious that the two sides are very close to one another historically. To extend the picture further I believe the Toronto clans who are the ultimate power today are probably in favor of this since they were always seen as Rizzuto's main indirect rivals, and while I'd say that the Montreal war in itself may not be a Sicilian vs Calabrese thing, when the 'Ndrangheta is involved, I think being a Calabrese may actually mean something, in which all of these guys (Luppinos/Violis and the Cotronis) are, the Musitanos are also Calabrese, but they were Vito's allies, back then this was a great thing, but times have changed and this past alliance may mean trouble for them in the near future.

As far as New York or any other American mafia family goes, their say in the matters or affairs within Canada is none existent. Their only say is in business dealings and ventures with the families of Canada, that's it.

Last edited by BronaZora; 12/16/16 01:05 PM.
Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: BronaZora] #901960
12/16/16 02:16 PM
12/16/16 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted By: BronaZora
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
In the late 1970s or even the 80s the New York families weren't that much in decline yet and still very powerful. Their real decline started in the 90s. However, for the Bonannos the 90s were a good time and it wasn't until their entire administration flipped that everything fell apart. Montagna's status meant enough for people to align with him. However Desjardins himself didn't have much to do with the Bonannos at that point and neither did his guys which is why they didn't care for him to be the leader, and when Montagna tried to take out Desjardins it was simply kill or be killed.


You're correct, the American Mafia was still powerful in the 70s/80s but it was in a steady decline. The truth is the American LCN was at its highest peak from the 30s to the 50s, they ran the syndicate like an oiled machine and no other Italian Mob group around the world compared. Then you had significant turning points such as the Apalachin meeting and the Valachi testimony, both of these events were the beginning of the decline. American LE started to catch up and with each decade, their power and influence decreased.


The American Mafia as a whole was in decline by the 1970s, but the New York families weren't that much affected until the mid 80s. It wasn't until the 90s that they lost much of their power over the unions among other things. By that time the Bonannos weren't involved in the unions anymore and so were able to fly under the radar and left unscathed until the early 2000s.

Quote:
During the 70s/80s the Montreal Mob was still very much so under the Bonnanos, by the 90s I would argue that they were under the Bonnano banner by name only but were independent and acted as such, they did kick up to them but I feel it was out of respect for Gerlando Sciascia since he was very close to Vito. Once Sciascia was gone, that was the end of it as it was clear that no more envelopes were being sent. Vitale was apparently sent to Montreal to make Vito a capo around 2001, he was received with respect and all but Vito declined the offer, that was a clear message to the Bonnanos that just in case they did not understand the memo back in 1999 (No more envelopes)


It hasn't been made clear whether envelops were still being send or not after 1999. Vitale even admitted as such. Domenick Cicale, another turncoat, claimed that tribute was still being send. He also said that Massino and Rizzuto partnered a stripclub. In addition, journalist Daniel Renaud stated that Montagna was used as a go-between and reguraly traveled to Montreal in the years before his deportation.

Anyway, this discussion seems to be never-ending due to conflicting statements, opinions and preferences. And even if Massino himself comes out of the woodwork and states that he was still receiving tribute, the people believing in the 1999 indepence will probably refute it.

As for myself, I don't think or very much doubt that the Bonannos are still involved in Montreal, but I don't believe it ended in 1999, unless Massino confirms it.


"It was between the brothers Kay -- I had nothing to do with it."
Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #901962
12/16/16 02:27 PM
12/16/16 02:27 PM
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Great posts Brona. Only thing I might disagree with is whether this would have happened or not under Vito's reign. I think if he stayed out of prison then no chance it happens because he was simply untouchable at that point. Once he went away, it gave the Controni/Violi faction and Desjardins (who seemed to be plotting his revenge already) faction was ready to pounce at that point. They were biding their time and figured more than likely he would eventually go down and they got their chance once Massino started talking. Most like Di Maulo who knew that would sink Vito, probably let others like Desjardins who might have not known (I think he drove Di Maulo then so he probably did know already) that it was coming and they plotted their revenge once Vito started fighting extradition.

I just don't see anyone strong enough until then to attempt an overthrow of Vito.

But excellent posts!

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: Sonny_Black] #901966
12/16/16 02:52 PM
12/16/16 02:52 PM
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Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
The American Mafia as a whole was in decline by the 1970s, but the New York families weren't that much affected until the mid 80s. It wasn't until the 90s that they lost much of their power over the unions among other things. By that time the Bonannos weren't involved in the unions anymore and so were able to fly under the radar and left unscathed until the early 2000s.


This is why I said it was a steady decline, it took decades but LE eventually caught up.

Quote:
It hasn't been made clear whether envelops were still being send or not after 1999. Vitale even admitted as such. Domenick Cicale, another turncoat, claimed that tribute was still being send. He also said that Massino and Rizzuto partnered a stripclub. In addition, journalist Daniel Renaud stated that Montagna was used as a go-between and reguraly traveled to Montreal in the years before his deportation.

Anyway, this discussion seems to be never-ending due to conflicting statements, opinions and preferences. And even if Massino himself comes out of the woodwork and states that he was still receiving tribute, the people believing in the 1999 indepence will probably refute it.


I get there are mixed opinions, but Vito declining to be a capo was the biggest answer to Montreal's independence. Also being a business partner with Massino is one thing and answering to him is completely another matter. Vito above all was a successful business man, he always preferred the way of diplomacy which is why he was able to remain the boss of Montreal and be on top for such a long time. Even if they did not answer to the Bonnanos, there was still a lot of business to be made (Remember, these guys transported narcotics to the US, they needed people to distribute), it should also be clear that Vito did business with other families, notably the Gambinos, so it's only natural that these families keep in touch, there's a lot of money to be made. Further proof to this, due to the power shift in Canada and the conflict in Montreal, today we are seeing more of these Canada/US relations transition to the NY families and the families in Toronto instead of Montreal, does that mean the 'Ndrangheta families of Toronto answer to New York? Absolutely not.

Quote:
As for myself, I don't think or very much doubt that the Bonannos are still involved in Montreal, but I don't believe it ended in 1999, unless Massino confirms it.


The Bonnanos and all the other American families are having a hard time operating within their own turfs thank to American LE, if they're having such rough time on their own ground, I highly doubt they're capable enough to be involved in matters or control families in other countries.

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
Great posts Brona. Only thing I might disagree with is whether this would have happened or not under Vito's reign. I think if he stayed out of prison then no chance it happens because he was simply untouchable at that point. Once he went away, it gave the Controni/Violi faction and Desjardins (who seemed to be plotting his revenge already) faction was ready to pounce at that point. They were biding their time and figured more than likely he would eventually go down and they got their chance once Massino started talking. Most like Di Maulo who knew that would sink Vito, probably let others like Desjardins who might have not known (I think he drove Di Maulo then so he probably did know already) that it was coming and they plotted their revenge once Vito started fighting extradition.

I just don't see anyone strong enough until then to attempt an overthrow of Vito.

But excellent posts!


Even if Vito did not go to jail, the Violi brothers and the Cotroni loyalists would eventually look for revenge, specially with the rise of the 'Ndrangheta families and their potential backing. The Rizzutos would have fared much better that's for sure, but a war would have happened eventually.

Last edited by BronaZora; 12/16/16 02:56 PM.
Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: BronaZora] #901979
12/16/16 05:46 PM
12/16/16 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted By: BronaZora

Even if Vito did not go to jail, the Violi brothers and the Cotroni loyalists would eventually look for revenge, specially with the rise of the 'Ndrangheta families and their potential backing. The Rizzutos would have fared much better that's for sure, but a war would have happened eventually.


I agree the honour of the Violi family was at stake. That's the risk the Rizzuto took when they let the sons live.

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: Ciment] #901985
12/16/16 06:18 PM
12/16/16 06:18 PM
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Marco Pizzi's name also appeared this summer on a blacklist of the Hells Angels. So maybe an agreement between the bikers and Rizzuto enemies like some media reported isn't far-fetched. It's a small world.

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: Hollander] #901986
12/16/16 06:23 PM
12/16/16 06:23 PM
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I agree.

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902000
12/16/16 09:00 PM
12/16/16 09:00 PM
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About the Bonannos they are done in Canada according to a good source on the RD forum. If there is one NY family with influence in Canada now it's the Gambinos.

Last edited by Hollander; 12/16/16 09:04 PM.
Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902013
12/17/16 06:17 AM
12/17/16 06:17 AM
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Chicago
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I think the Rizzuto/Caruana-[BadWord]-ra/ Gambino connections go back to at least the 70s, Nicola Rizzuto was partners in a ranch with a number of heavyweight Gambinos and narcotics traffickers.

I think anti mafia posted something about Paolo Gambino having meetings in Ontario I the 70s.....



(The whole link....)
https://www.tni.org/en/paper/rothschilds-mafia-aruba



(Specifically)


Only when the Americans and Italians pooled their findings did they grasp what was going on. In 1983 the Italian police summarized their investigations in the Bono+159 report. The report identified [BadWord] and Caruana as the pivot of the well organized network moving heroin up to the US and the money down. It was the first time the clan was thoroughly examined. In fact, the police had uncovered part of the supply line for the Pizza Connection. But, while the US Pizza Connection trial resulted in the conviction of a significant segment of the network the authorities didn't find the real link between North-America and Sicily. (48) That missing link was to be found in Venezuela, where the [BadWord]-Caruana clan had set up their headquarters at the start of the 1970s, buying hotels and founding a string of businesses in Caracas and Valencia.

The most intriguing of the dozens [BadWord]-Caruana enterprises was a cattle-breeding company on an extended ranch in the state of Barinas, close to the Colombian border. It had its own private airstrip. A special task-force of the Venezuelan intelligence-service DISIP looked at this farm called Ganaderia Rio Zapa, established in 1971. (49) The shareholders of the firm represented the creme-de-la-creme of Mafia heroin-movers in those days:

(NOTE, NO BONNANOS AS FAR AS IMPORTATION, LAUNDERING, THEY ONLY COME INTO PLAY ONCE THE STUFF GETS TO NEW YORK FOR DISTRIBUTION...)

* Salvatore 'Cicchiteddu' Greco, the former head of the overall Commission of the Sicilian Cosa Nostra, and one of the pioneers in the international heroin trade (50);
* Nick Rizzuto, a lieutenant in the Montreal-based Cotroni Family, but highly independent and in fact subordinate to the Sicilian Mafia (i.e. [BadWord]-Caruana);
* Antonio Napoli, a high-ranking made member of the New York Gambino Family and 'the biggest mover of junk to the United States' (51);
* John Gambino, a relative of Carlo Gambino and boss of the Sicilian faction of the New York Gambino Family (52);
* Brothers Angelo and Francesco Mongiový, figure-heads of the [BadWord] in Caracas and Italy's financial centre Milan. According to a DEA report, Angelo's son Nino Mongiový married Paolo [BadWord]'s daughter and was the 'super manager for drugs of all kinds passing through Miami'. (53)

The DEA spotted them investigating the Napoli brothers of the Gambino Family in New York. Antonio Napoli had moved to Venezuela and was a partner in a [BadWord] business. At the time DEA headquarters figured the trail irrelevant; nevertheless, special agent Tom Tripodi was sent to Caracas. DEA-analyst Mona Ewell told reporter Claire Sterling that Tripodi "came back with the whole thing." (54)

"We saw the [BadWord] and the Caruanas. The security around their homes was incredible... They had control in Venezuela like you wouldn't believe... We saw their businesses, all fronts for paper-shuffling. What these people handled was the money. Their names had been coming up for years on the money. Historically, they worked the money. They did it for cocaine as well as heroin ... It was a tremendous operation, and it was going on a long, long time... In my opinion, that's still the key. They're the people with the money; they've been in the business of narcotics the longest."

The implication, as Italian investigator Alessandro Pansa has noted is that "Venezuela has its own Cosa Nostra family as if it is Sicilian territory ... Until this day, the structure and hierarchy of the Mafia has been entirely reproduced in Venezuela ... The clan has direct links with the ruling Commission of the Sicilian Mafia, and are acknowledged by the American Cosa Nostra." Pansa claims that they are the funnel for the Gambino Family. Indeed, according to Tommaso Buscetta, it was the all-powerful New York Mafia boss Carlo Gambino himself who sponsored the acknowledgement of the [BadWord]-Caruana Family. (55)

Last edited by CabriniGreen; 12/17/16 06:43 AM.
Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902015
12/17/16 06:38 AM
12/17/16 06:38 AM
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I got a question guys, what exact role did Salvatore Catalano play, in regards, wait, let me rephrase...

Where did he stand in terms of;

1. His role within the Bonnano family? I know he was a capo, but in Sixth Family, they said he stayed to himself and just concerned himself with moving Sicilian mafia heroin. Yet he was important enough that he almost made boss of the family. I'm assuming this was a Sicilian mafia initiative? Them trying to get THIER MAN in a top spot in New York. To go with their operatives in South America, Sicily, and Montreal. I can't see the American guys having sponsored that decision.

2. What was his role in relation to John Gambino?
I ask cause I could never get a handle on WHO was in charge of the Pizza connection.
Having asked that question, I suspect Gambino oversaw the American end of the ENTIRE OPERATION, ( importation, distribution, AND laundering the money) while Catalano was in charge of distribution in NY?
Or was it, Bonnanos distribute in Brooklyn, and the Gambinos had Jersey? But they both were operating in Queens right? Did they split it?

I think John Gambino handled a separate operation, but was SUPPLIED by the same source in Sicily as the Bonnanos. I think the Bonnano dope came through the Caruana-[BadWord]-ras, through the Rizzutos, whereas the Gambinos dope went direct to the Cherry Hill crew, who were moving shit DIRECT for the Palermo clans. Whereas the Rizzuto groups loyalty was to Agrigento, and their allies?

(This excerpt)

The investigation only looked at the years 1978-85, and the figures proved to be conservative. Subsequent evidence revealed that the investigators had missed a lot of what was going on. In 1992 pentito Gaspare Mutolo, Cosa Nostra's contact with Thai traffickers, disclosed massive heroin transports at the start of the 1980s. In 1981, Mutolo organized a 400 kilo shipment to the US. The [BadWord]-Caruana clan received half of the load, while John Gambino's crew took care of the other 200 kilos. When the money of the first deal came back, Mutolo immediately started to arrange another similar transport. (57)



SEE HOW THEY SPLIT THE LOAD?


3. Any info on how the Gambino relationship with Toronto works present day would be greatly appreciated..

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902016
12/17/16 07:48 AM
12/17/16 07:48 AM
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The killed Carmine Verduci had also close links to the Gambino family.

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902023
12/17/16 10:55 AM
12/17/16 10:55 AM
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Deadly conflict between pot producers
Sentenced to nine years for killing his boss

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12/16/conflit-mortel-entre-producteurs-de-pot

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902042
12/17/16 02:33 PM
12/17/16 02:33 PM
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Canada
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It seems the Gambino's have contacts with specific Ndrangheta clans both in NYC, Toronto and Italy.

Certain Italian indictments revealed that Ndrangheta clans have been supplying Cosa Nostra clans for a few years, dividing their turf and supply routes by either selling narcotics to eastern sicilian or western sicilian clans. I had read the Aquino-Coluccio and Commisso-Crupi's divide sicily by shipping either towards Catania or Palermo, the two biggest hubs for cocaine consumption and cosa nostra strongholds.

These relationships have been exposed, to a certain extent, by New Bridge and other elements of American ndrangheta building relationships with the American LCN. The role the Rizzuto clan and the CC clan has been somewhat replaced by stronger ndrangheta families with solid south american contacts. This isn't to say that cosa nostra clans aren't importing their own blow, but it seems the calabrians have solid supply routes at the moment.

This could also explain the recent turmoil in Canada, which is in a current state of war and renewal. The Calabrians want the market, they want revenge and they have power to do it.

Last edited by eurodave; 12/17/16 02:35 PM.
Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902052
12/17/16 04:07 PM
12/17/16 04:07 PM
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Last edited by Ciment; 12/17/16 04:08 PM.
Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902112
12/18/16 12:53 PM
12/18/16 12:53 PM
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Canada
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That pasta company is Sicilian owned

Last edited by eurodave; 12/18/16 01:02 PM.
Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: eurodave] #902135
12/18/16 06:54 PM
12/18/16 06:54 PM
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Originally Posted By: eurodave
That pasta company is Sicilian owned


Are you sure?

The company's website seems to indicate the family's roots in Campobasso, Molise--see http://pastaromana.com/en/history/.

Speaking of which, have any of the Quebecers om this board heard whether Mylena Di Maulo and Frank Cotroni Jr. are separated? divorced?

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902138
12/18/16 07:07 PM
12/18/16 07:07 PM
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Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: eurodave
That pasta company is Sicilian owned


Are you sure?

The company's website seems to indicate the family's roots in Campobasso, Molise--see http://pastaromana.com/en/history/.

Speaking of which, have any of the Quebecers om this board heard whether Mylena Di Maulo and Frank Cotroni Jr. are separated? divorced?


I can't call them and ask lol but I was told they were Sicilian...the company is named Romana but yet their "history" is in Molise.....identity crisis much lol


Last edited by eurodave; 12/18/16 07:14 PM.
Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902142
12/18/16 07:18 PM
12/18/16 07:18 PM
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Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: eurodave
That pasta company is Sicilian owned


Are you sure?

The company's website seems to indicate the family's roots in Campobasso, Molise--see http://pastaromana.com/en/history/.

Speaking of which, have any of the Quebecers om this board heard whether Mylena Di Maulo and Frank Cotroni Jr. are separated? divorced?


Found same online:

Francesco married Milena Di Maulo, the daughter of high-ranking mobster Jos Di Maulo, in the summer of 1991. The event was held at the Marie-Riene-du-Monde cathedral in downtown Montreal and was attended by some of the top members of the Mafia, West End Gang, and the Dubois Clan. The couple would have two children together but their marriage would unfortunately end in divorce in late 2000.

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: Ciment] #902146
12/18/16 08:11 PM
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Yeah they were divorced. Francesco was at the funeral of Di Maulo, but you never know how relations really were at the end.

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902163
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Currently there are in Quebec about 80 active Hells Angels in freedom and 160 members of subordinate clubs or sympathizers. They celebrated their 39th birthday celebrations in Canada on Saturday night at a Sainte-Anne-de-Sorel hotel.

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902174
12/19/16 01:07 AM
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So i would imagine frank cotronis sons were inducted into the bonanno family when frank sr was still the capo during the 90tys even thou the rizzutos had the power. Are the controni kids made men? I would think the pops probaly asked massino and did the inductions themselves up there.

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902293
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http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12/20/le-bistro-pot-masson-vise-par-un-cocktail-molotov

Another molotov at Bistro Pot Masson

MONTREAL | The Pot Masson bistro, located on a Avenue in the borough of Rosemont-La-Petite-Patrie in Montreal, was the target of a Molotov cocktail during the night from Monday to Tuesday.
According to Benoit Boisselle, a public relations officer with the Montreal Police Department (SPVM), "a restaurant window was smashed by an unknown object before an incendiary object was thrown" a little before 2:30 am .
Fortunately, staff who were still on site were able to control the fire before the flames could cause serious damage.
No one was injured during the event.
The SPVM's arson investigators will begin their investigation in the morning, Agent Boisselle said.

Last edited by Ciment; 12/20/16 08:01 AM.
Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: Ciment] #902304
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^^^^
According to Quebec's business registry, the primary and majority shareholder of Pot Masson is a woman named Roxane Mercier. Does her name ring a bell?

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902316
12/20/16 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted By: antimafia
^^^^
According to Quebec's business registry, the primary and majority shareholder of Pot Masson is a woman named Roxane Mercier. Does her name ring a bell?


It does not ring a bell but I am wondering if this is biker related not sure though.
The area where this bistro is located is a french neighborhood. That area years ago,used to be Devils Disciples territory who lost in a biker war against the Popeyes that were backed by the HA.

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: pmac] #902321
12/20/16 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted By: pmac
So i would imagine frank cotronis sons were inducted into the bonanno family when frank sr was still the capo during the 90tys even thou the rizzutos had the power. Are the controni kids made men? I would think the pops probaly asked massino and did the inductions themselves up there.


Francesco was an important figure in the organisation so that he was made in the 90s makes sense.

Francesco was in charge of his father's drug network. He travelled to Columbia in February, 1995 and met with Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela and Miguel Rodriguez Orejuela, the heads of the Cali Cartel. They met at Miguel's posh home and discussed setting up a major cocaine pipeline from Columbia to Canada. Francesco was also seen meeting major drug traffickers at the Villa Sorrento hotel in Mexico, which is co-owned by his father. He would run the network until Frank Sr. was released from jail on September 28, 1995.

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902368
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Just because the kids dealt in drugs doesn't mean they were made into the mafia. There's just not much evidence to support Frank Cotroni's sons being made, Paolo for one, wasn't. And the Cotroni children were involved in the drug business long before the 90's, from his two sons, all the way down to his daughter and son-in-law. They were all involved in cocaine & hashish trafficking. Francesco was also imprisoned for murder in the 80's along with Real Simard & Claude Faber, for the murder of Giuseppe Montegano inside Francesco's club. It should be noted that Frank Cotroni Sr. at one point in '97 had direct contact to the Cali Cartel. Quite frankly, neither Frank Sr. nor Francesco (Frank Jr.) needed the Bonannos.

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902371
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Sorry for the interruption, but when does the leonardo rizzuto trial start?


"McGurn likes you, so I make you. So you are now one of us, if you fuck up, we take it out on McGurn. He is your sponsor. Fuck up, it's his ass. You work in his crew, he is your capo."
Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902372
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I had no idea, their original family name is not Cotroni, but Cotrone.

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over [Re: antimafia] #902377
12/20/16 10:39 PM
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Originally Posted By: antimafia
Nicola Spagnolo, the son of Vincenzo Spagnolo (who was killed this past October), has a contract on his head.

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/12/14/un-contrat-sur-la-tete-du-membre-de-la-mafia-nic-spagnolo


Did anyone read the May 11, 2013 French-language article to which I've linked below when it was originally published in La Presse?

http://www.pressreader.com/canada/la-presse/20130511/281702612228851

I'm surprised to find Nicola Spagnolo among the many witnesses the prosecution wanted to testify in a preliminary phase of Sal Montagna's murder trial. Spagnolo may have been either friendly with or hostile to Montagna--in my opinion only, very likely the latter.

The contract that Spagnolo is reported to have on his head probably has to do at least in part with his desire to avenge his father's death. The same might also be said about the imprisoned Liborio Cun-trera. But this assumes that the sons even know who was behind or directly involved in their fathers' murders.

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