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Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over

Posted By: antimafia

Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 02/09/13 01:32 PM

Go to

http://blogs.montrealgazette.com/2013/02...s-far-from-over

and click on the link to the audio by Paul Cherry, reporter for The Gazette in Montreal.

Then visit

http://www.montrealgazette.com/mobile/ne...0509/story.html

to read the article he wrote on this very same subject.

Next, go to the companion piece found at

http://www.canada.com/news/Nine+shootings+three+months/7941017/story.html
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 02/09/13 05:06 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Then visit

http://www.montrealgazette.com/mobile/ne...0509/story.html

to read the article he wrote on this very same subject.


One of the better articles that summarize the situation in Montreal of the past several years up until now.
Posted By: antimafia

Is the mob war indeed over? - 05/31/13 03:13 AM

According to TVA Nouvelles -- and it's an exclusive! -- Vito Rizzuto has retained his crown. A lot of problems with the story (mostly factual errors), but I post items regardless of whether I agree with them.

Link:

http://tvanouvelles.ca/lcn/infos/faitsdivers/archives/2013/05/20130530-181114.html

Google translation:

Vito Rizzuto is still the godfather
TVA Nouvelles
First published May 30, 2013 at 6:11 pm

Only eight months after his release from prison , Vito Rizzuto has indeed resumed its activities . TVA Nouvelles has learned that it is again considered the godfather Montreal .

Vito Rizzuto has spent the last six years in prison in Colorado, United States. Meanwhile, his opponents were eliminated one by one all employees including close family like his brother, Paolo Renda, his son, Nick Jr., and without that nobody rises to replicate.

"The Sicilians who were part of his clan had not abdicated. By cons, you could say they played the rather low "profile says specialist police investigations, Richard Dupuis.

In October 2010, his father, Nicolo, was killed at his home in front of his wife and daughter. The day of the funeral, we found a box on the front of the church.

It is an old custom that dates back to the origins of the Mafia. It was a message sent to Vito Rizzuto: "Are you ready to abdicate, or do you want us to continue the massacre?"

According to sources TVA Nouvelles, the package was sent from Woodbridge, Ontario. It is in this affluent suburb of Toronto, where the Board of Directors' Ndrangheta, the Calabrian mafia headquarters.

"It was two successful hair that Rizzuto was successful in 80: take control by eliminating the Calabrian clan," says Mr. Dupuis.

The response of the sponsor came shortly after his release from prison. In August, four senior members of street gangs are shot, including Chénier, Chief Red.

Since his return to Canada in October, nearly a dozen of his enemies have been eliminated, the Calabrian Joe Di Maulo, one of the most influential criminals Montreal.

To Ontario

More in Ontario does not dispute the authority of Rizzuto said Rob Lamberti, a journalist who covers the mafia Ontario for 30 years. According to him, he is back in power.

Vito Rizzuto has achieved the impossible with his personal aura, but his absence showed a lack of notes from the Sicilian clan. If Calabrian bow today is perhaps because they chose to wait before it disappears to regain control of Montreal.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 06/03/13 01:19 PM

Link to French-language article:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/dossie...pose-sa-loi.php

Google translation:

Vito Rizzuto imposes its law

Daniel Renaud
La Presse
Published June 3 2013 5:00 am|Updated 6:50 pm

A year ago, nobody thought that Vito Rizzuto return to Montreal. Eight months after his return, his clan is once again the most powerful in the city. If he could succeed in this tour de force, it is because the organized crime situation was relatively calm during his reign and his arbiter has earned him the respect of the criminal underworld. The largest organization of the Mafia, who does not like that the headlamps are trained on her, vraisemblement needed it to end its bloodiest episode of the last 40 years in Montreal.

"If Vito returns to Montreal, it will pass," had told La Presse a police officer a year ago, almost to the day. Today, it is clear that the police, like most people, was royally wrong about the chances of returning the sponsor, after nine years in the Canadian and U.S. prisons.

"The police and criminals have made the same mistake: they never thought would Vito," said another, more recently, demonstrating the evolution of the situation.

Since January, La Presse has ceased to attach the qualifier ousted after the word to describe godfather Vito Rizzuto. If it has been successful tour de force to regain control of the city in a few months, because of the respect that he dedicated to the criminal underworld, and since he became president of Board of Directors held in Montreal somewhere in the 90s crime. At the time he headed the Mafia with an iron fist in a velvet glove, everything was relatively quiet. The settling of accounts in all their forms were part of the decor, but were further apart.

But after his arrest in January 2004, and more particularly his extradition to the United States two years later, "the blood flowed," as he himself had prophesied the RCMP officers who 'escort.

In fact, in just nine years between his arrest on 19 January 2004 and today, at least 40 murders, 18 attempted murders, kidnappings and eight two disappearances related to Italian organized crime occurred in and around Montreal, as a compilation by La Presse.

This is the bloodiest in the history of the Montreal Mafia episode, including the fall of Violi, there are more than 30 years.

Return

After his release in October, Vito Rizzuto was arrested in Toronto, to measure its support. Obviously, the great organization of the Mafia, who does not like that the headlamps are trained on it, either by violence or commissions of inquiry, needed him to end the bloodshed in Montreal.

Upon his return, the blood flowed more, but calm has returned for several weeks, a sign that clan has taken things in hand and others have had to rally, by choice or not. Police pressure that followed the arrest of two men after the murder of Gaëtan Gosselin, right arm kingpin Raynald Desjardins, probably slowed the enthusiasm to some, but sources have told us that Vito Rizzuto has launched an appeal for calm late March.

Since it would direct its affairs, Montreal or the Dominican Republic, and had even begun peace talks with his most bitter enemies. He even try to expand its influence in Sicily if we rely on an article in the Italian newspaper La Repubblica that he described as "the undisputed leader of the Canadian Cosa Nostra."

In Montreal, Vito Rizzuto is seen regularly on the golf course or in a restaurant downtown in the evening. Its outputs are discrete and this will be the case as his honor will not be washed, as the murders of members of his own family will not be avenged. It will take however long it takes.

We should not be surprised if, once this is done, at age 67, he left the center stage to the next generation.

Peace talks underway

Press has learned that discussions aimed at establishing peace took place about three weeks ago between representatives of the sponsor Vito Rizzuto and his former lieutenant became enemy, the guy Raynald Desjardins.

"There have been negotiations and now the clans are at the stage of reflection. Let's see if it will work, but it is certain that goes closer to peace than to war, "a source told us last week.

In recent months, contracts had been put on the head of family clans Desjardins and Giuseppe De Vito, another leader at war with the Sicilians. They lived holed or had left the area. However, The Press has learned that these individuals were told, in recent weeks, they had nothing to fear and that they could return to the city.

During the appearance of the 26 people arrested last week following the dismantling of a network of drug traffickers, the accused were defended by lawyers who represented enemy clans in recent years - another relaxing currently prevailing in the mafia.

According to the main theory of the police, Desjardins De Vito and other chieftains as Salvatore Montagna Arcuri and brothers have formed an alliance to lead the Mafia after the overthrow of the Sicilians in 2010. But since the release of Vito Rizzuto, last October, several members of their clans were murdered. Desjardins including lost his brother, the influential Joe Di Maulo, and his friend and confidant Gaetan Gosselin. One who held this role for Giuseppe De Vito Vincenzo Scuderi was killed in January.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 10/07/13 02:15 PM

According to the French-language article to which I've linked below, the war is over.

http://www.journaldequebec.com/2013/10/06/vito-rizzuto-bien-en-selle
Posted By: azguy

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 10/07/13 03:38 PM

How can we translate that, it looks like it was published today..?????

help, please...???
Posted By: mike68

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 10/07/13 06:16 PM

http://translate.google.com/

Quote:
A year after his return home after six years in a maximum security prison in Colorado, Vito Rizzuto has indeed taken the reins of the Montreal Mafia , a feat that few experts would have thought possible .

According to Pierre de Champlain, Montreal Mafia expert , since his return to the Montreal area , Vito Rizzuto was able to assert his authority and bring renewed "relative peace between the various factions " of organized crime.

This " return to power " does not, however, done without the bloodshed . After the murder of his son , Nick Jr., in December 2009 and his father Nicolo , less than a year later , Vito and its allies probably wanted to avenge their own.

Although the Rizzuto clan was weakened when the sponsor returned to Montreal , "there fringes that are loyal during the time of his absence ," said M. de Champlain.

With the help of his faithful allies , the sponsor has seen its list of enemies to thin while many heads have rolled in the months that followed his potential return.

This is particularly the case of Joseph Di Maulo , which would have betrayed the Rizzuto clan , when Vito was in prison. He was assassinated in Blainville, only a month after the return of the head of the Montreal Mafia .

Antonio Nicaso , another expert from the underworld , for its part, believes that " Rizzuto clan took control of the street, but since the Charbonneau commission revealed links between the mafia and politicians, it will not be easy to rebuild the system and all the links he had created . "

Nicaso also believes that the head of the Sicilian clan rather thirst for revenge and does not necessarily intend to reestablish the links . He believes that Rizzuto other enemies on his list.

Much longer?

Still, experts say it is difficult to predict how long the reign of Vito Rizzuto will last, since it is already 67 years old .

"Is that one can say that the Rizzuto clan will rise from the ashes ? That I 'm not sure as the son of Vito was murdered , "said Pierre de Champlain.

Antonio Nicaso does not believe the Calabrian , who are very powerful in Ontario who are rivals of the Sicilians , necessarily want to take control of Montreal , when Vito Rizzuto will hand .

"It depends on the ability of Rizzuto ensure the transfer of power ," he has just started.

The side of the Police Department of the City of Montreal , nobody could answer questions from QMI Agency during the weekend.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 10/07/13 06:23 PM

mike68:

Thanks for providing a Google Translate translation.

I've been on my mobile device all day, so copying and pasting a translation would have been cumbersome.

All:

Below is a link to the English counterpart to the French article. NB: Not a word-for-word translation. Both articles slighty differ in content from each other.

http://www.sunnewsnetwork.ca/sunnews/canada/archives/2013/10/20131007-130453.html
Posted By: pmac

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 10/07/13 08:16 PM

I don't think rizutto would be playing lots of golf with the sniper who killed his father on the loose. so im thinking the wars over and the sniper is dead. wonder what his standing with the bonanno's today is. I still think nyc played a role in this.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 10/07/13 08:41 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
mike68:

Thanks for providing a Google Translate translation.

I've been in my mobile device all day, so copying and pasting a translation would have been cumbersome.

All:

Below is a link to the English counterpart to the French article. NB: Not a word-for-word translation. Both articles slighty differ in content from each other.

http://www.sunnewsnetwork.ca/sunnews/canada/archives/2013/10/20131007-130453.html


Wow, so Rizzuto had Montagna whacked? Quite a different story compared to what we have been hearing.
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 10/08/13 12:30 AM

It doesn't seem like Rizzuto ordering the hit on Montagna adds up. If it were Rizzuto's men that killed Montagna, then it would make sense. However, it was Desjardins and his guys that killed Montagna. It's pretty clear that Desjardins was on the opposing side of the Rizzuto clan and it was in retaliation for an attempted hit on Desjardins.... Don't get me wrong, I don't think Rizzuto was upset to see Montagna get whacked, but in my opinion it wasn't on his orders.
Posted By: LuanKuci

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 10/08/13 08:49 AM

yeah...seems strange that Rizzuto had Montagna killed.

Then again: Montagna did try to muscle in and maybe (maybe) replace Vito Rizzuto's role in the city.

That suspicion could have been enough to have someone like Rizzuto (a real planner) ok that hit. Regardless of Montagna's affiliations to NY and oversea.
Posted By: mike68

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 10/08/13 03:35 PM

I don't know if I would necessarily believe the New York Post, let alone a cellmate at a SuperMax prison. I don't see Rizzuto blabbing something about wanting to be boss of the world to someone in the can. But what do I know, never met the guy, never will.
Posted By: AntonioRotolo

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 10/08/13 06:53 PM

Originally Posted By: mike68
I don't know if I would necessarily believe the New York Post, let alone a cellmate at a SuperMax prison. I don't see Rizzuto blabbing something about wanting to be boss of the world to someone in the can. But what do I know, never met the guy, never will.

Eaxctly, plus the BS report last year once released that said Rizzuto was meeting with New York "underworld sources." I find it hard to believe. One big conspiracy theory I will believe though is that De Vito was murdered inside prison....Notice how prison authorities and police are keeping this reaaaaaal quiet. No press releases, nothing.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 10/08/13 10:52 PM

Yea I agree on De Vito.

I also don't think Rizzuto ordered a hit on Montagna, too risky from a U.S. prison!!

I definitely don't believe the inmate either, no way Rizzuto is that dumb. You don't make it that long at the top by being that dumb.
Posted By: AntonioRotolo

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 10/10/13 04:44 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
Yea I agree on De Vito.

I also don't think Rizzuto ordered a hit on Montagna, too risky from a U.S. prison!!

I definitely don't believe the inmate either, no way Rizzuto is that dumb. You don't make it that long at the top by being that dumb.

Naw I think the hit on Montagna was allllll Desjardins-Di Maulo.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 11/18/14 01:27 AM

Link:

http://natpo.st/1yO5ehS
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 11/18/14 04:25 AM

It suprises me how fast those murder trials start in Italy as opposed to Canada. It's not even a year since Fernandez was killed while the trial of the murder of Montagna, which is now three years ago, has not even started.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 11/18/14 04:12 PM

Wow no wonder he ended up dead. Spurning two calls to meet with Rizzuto? You're begging to be clipped.

Sonny some of these countries don't play! Canada/USA both are bad about delaying and bullshitting. It wouldn't surprise me if something else comes up with Desjardins and delays it even further.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 11/18/14 04:23 PM

pretty cool. think will find out soon who killed nick jr and started all this. I didn't even know you can visit cuba, shit there still having mafia summits there in the 21 century. wonder who the hitman was in mexico think vito farmed iit out to the cartel?
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 11/18/14 05:23 PM

Ask Tony Magi. There is a reason he is riding around in armored vehicles and wearing bullet proof vests. He at least knows who was behind it.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 11/18/14 06:03 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
Wow no wonder he ended up dead. Spurning two calls to meet with Rizzuto? You're begging to be clipped.


This guy was as stupid as he was tough.

Quote:
Sonny some of these countries don't play! Canada/USA both are bad about delaying and bullshitting. It wouldn't surprise me if something else comes up with Desjardins and delays it even further.


Wouldn't suprise me in the slightest. However, it's only three months away and delays are usually announced far ahead of time.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 12/28/14 10:54 PM

Mob vendetta spree expected to continue in new year

http://www.torontosun.com/2014/12/28/mob-vendetta-spree-expected-to-continue
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Is the mob war indeed over? - 12/29/14 06:38 PM

Lamberti always writes decent articles. His articles usually don't offer big revelations, but he always seems to be very accurate.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 05/26/15 01:03 AM

Reporters Éric Thibault and Félix Séguin have written an article, currently behind a Le Journal de Montréal paywall, suggesting that Francesco Arcadi and two others--all three imprisoned--may fight, upon their release, to claim what they believe to be their rightful place at the top of the Montreal Mafia hierarchy.

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/05/26/un-trone-dans-la-mire
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 05/26/15 01:31 AM

If most of us have guessed that Lorenzo Giordano and Francesco Del Balso also want a piece of the pie if not the whole pie, I think we've taken a fairly good guess.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 05/26/15 07:54 AM

The article is no longer behind a paywall.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 05/27/15 10:27 AM

Stefano Sollecito has cancer? And lol @ being him driving a white Lamborghini with gold rims almost everywhere he goes.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 05/27/15 04:48 PM

That was the first time I've read he has cancer. Sounds like things will keep going out there.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 07/01/15 04:57 PM

Not even the establishment of a mafia roundtable has led to a total cessation of hostilities.

Link to French-language article:

http://plus.lapresse.ca/screens/e6f1a76a-51ca-4b6b-96f9-be90d5bcb8e9%7Ch41Rg9KPvReb.html

Translation (using Google Translate):

A MOLOTOV COCKTAIL WAS THROWN INTO A "HOT SPOT" OF THE MAFIA
DANIEL RENAUD
LA PRESSE

Italian coffee considered by the police and the criminal underworld as a "hot spot" was the target of a Molotov cocktail in the night from Tuesday to Laval.

According to our information, the bar-restaurant Romcafé, located on Boulevard des Laurentides Vimont in the neighborhood, would be attended by individuals related to or close to the new leadership of the Montreal Mafia table set up in the death case Natural former Godfather, Vito Rizzuto, in December 2013.

Moreover, according to our sources, Vito Rizzuto would have gone to this place almost daily between his return to Montreal after his release from a US prison in October 2012, and his death.

A lieutenant of the Mafia, Tonino Callocchia, murdered in a bistro of Rivière-des-Prairies in fall 2014, have also been seen on numerous occasions in Romcafé during the same period.

"It's a message or a warning, and it is clear that it is people who are at this place, it is their place," believes one of our sources.

NO SUSPECT
For now, the police do not know where the attack is coming.

In recent months, the informants told us of tensions or disagreements that exist within the Mafia, but it is too early to conclude that they are the cause of the incident.

During his time at the bar-restaurant Romcafé this morning, La Presse noted the presence of certain individuals at the crestfallen who seemed nervous.

It was about 4 pm when suspects or have (are) broken the window of the establishment with a tool and threw a Molotov cocktail inside.

A fire broke out early, but the flames were quickly extinguished, causing damage valued at less than $ 10,000.

"Investigators Arson Laval police went to the scene and interviewed witnesses. The scene was appraised, photos and samples were taken by police forensic identification. The owner was met and, for the moment, there are no suspects and the mobile remains unknown, "says Sergeant Frederick John of the Laval police.

In recent months, a dozen Molotov cocktails were thrown at cafes, restaurants, shops or cars, Montreal and the North Shore. It is not clear if some of these incidents are connected.

Last year, criminals fires were started in two restaurants in Montreal known to be frequented by people linked to the Mafia, La Cantina and Cavalli.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/29/15 12:47 PM

A Molotov cocktail was thrown at the law offices of Loris Cavaliere.

Link to French-language article:

http://tvanouvelles.ca/lcn/infos/faitsdivers/archives/2015/09/20150929-055756.html
Posted By: TonyG

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/29/15 03:16 PM

Is there a coincidence that Pat Musitano got a Molotov cocktail a week ago?
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/29/15 03:22 PM

Whatever became of the speculation of Leonardo Rizzuto having a seat at the "round table"? He & his sister work in those law offices according to the article. Doesn't seem like it'd be linked to the Musitano situation, but anythings possible really.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/29/15 05:33 PM

What's up with fire bombs up there? Here in the states the courts systems doesn't look at arson soft. They'll give you big numbers and you do alot of time in hospital prisons cause your a fire bug and it puts alot of people in jeopardy. Alot of arson state cases have mando minis.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/30/15 12:21 AM

pmac it takes a good bit up there to get a big sentence. Due to the publication ban up there I don't even think we know for sure how many years Desjardins is getting for his guilty plea but it has to be not that bad you would think. It's like they are still stuck in the 60's up there in terms of laws against gangsters and that's the main reason I think we see the killings and firebombings.

This is interesting though because it has ramped up lately.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/30/15 01:01 PM

Apparently, Stefano Sollecito's assuming the godfather role may not be working out so well for him.

Link to French-language article:

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/09/30/funerailles-et-cocktails-molotov
Posted By: SonnyBlackstein

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/30/15 01:53 PM

Is that article avail in English please AM?
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/30/15 02:05 PM

^^^^
Not at the moment. The article may never be translated into English--if it is, the online-published article would show QMI Agency near or under the reporter's byline.

For now, you may want to click or tap on

Translation using Google Translate

I'm not always a fan of Google Translate, but it sometimes does get the job done.

Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/30/15 02:10 PM

Hmm, so Leonardo is considered a sort of authority figure in the Montreal Rizzuto clan. Always had an idea he'd get more involved in some capacity after the deaths of his brother and father.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/30/15 02:16 PM

The French-language item found at the link below may be of interest too.

http://tvanouvelles.ca/lcn/infos/faitsdivers/archives/2015/09/20150930-072510.html
Posted By: SonnyBlackstein

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/30/15 02:20 PM

My thanks AM.
Posted By: mike68

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/30/15 04:26 PM

So am I correct in interpreting that this may be a dispute between the mafia and the biker gangs that led to the molotov cocktail thrown into the law office and the murder of the young kid last week? Anything to do with the heavy hitters who are getting out of prison soon who may want to reclaim their territories (Del Balso etc.)?
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/31/15 04:04 PM

There has been another firebombing in Montreal, this time at a gym where Giuseppe Fetta appears to be an employee. Link to French-language article:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-a-la-mafia.php
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/31/15 08:22 PM

Looks like things might be heating back up. They must love torturing these guys who thought they were going to get away with what they done when Vito died. No matter who is running the show they are going to continue going after these guys until they are all dead.

Google translate is not always the best, but it helps:




The gym targeted by the attack, 6183 located at the rue Marivaux, appears on court documents as the workplace of Giuseppe Fetta, 36, arrested in the roundup important Clemenza led by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Canada in June 2014 against three drug trafficking cells linked to the Mafia.

There is even written that it is the gym Fetta, but according to the Registrar of Companies, the 6183 Crossfit is the name of a nearby Roberto Bastone, one of the alleged leaders of one of the cell dismantled in the same police strike.

Fetta is charged with conspiracy, gangsterism and drug production in this case while Bastone, 43, faces charges of conspiracy, gangsterism, drug trafficking, importing narcotics, assault, kidnapping and extortion.

Bastone has no criminal history while Giuseppe Fetta was also arrested in 2006 in connection with the operation Colosseum and sentenced to a suspended sentence for possession of weapon.

At that time, Fetta was considered by police as part of the Lorenzo Giordano arms team, one of the captains of the leaders of the Montreal Mafia and sentenced covered after extensive investigation.

But according to police, subsequently Fetta would have ranked in the camp of the clan leaders who attempted to overthrow Rizzuto at the head of the Montreal Mafia in 2009 and 2010. He miraculously survived an attempted murder committed in December 2012, two months after the return to Montreal godfather Vito Rizzuto.

Quickly mastered

It was around 3 am this morning that 30 Montreal firefighters who came to control a fire in 6183 Crossfit gym, contacted the police to tell them that the front door of the business located at the corner of streets and Marivaux Prado was shattered and at least one incendiary device was thrown inside.

"There is some damage to nearby shops, but they are limited. We have no description of a suspect and the investigation was given to investigators Arson SPVM "describes Emran Abdullah, spokesman for the police.
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/01/15 03:32 PM

I haven't been on here in a while, but figured with the upcoming release of Arcadi, Giordano and Del Baso, that things would heat up on Montreal.

After reading a few of the recent articles, I have a few questions for posters who follow Montreal closely.

1. I'm trying to understand the role of Tonino Callochia. It seemed like he was close to Roger Valiquette, who was close to Dejardins (which would put him against Rizzuto?). Yet on the other hand, he seemed to become more notable after Rizzuto regained influence. Where did he stand during the war against the Rizzutos? Is there a definitive answer as to what side had him killed and why?

2. One of the articles mentions "the book", which was in the hands of Arcadi's lieutenants Giordano and Del Baso, then went to Valiquette, now Stefano Sollecito. "The book" seems to have significance for the clan in power due to financial reasons. Where does Valiquette fit into this? Also I'm assuming that Paulo Renda would have been in control "the book", leading to his kidnapping/disappearance?
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/01/15 07:58 PM

Has Arcadi been released yet?
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/01/15 08:19 PM

As for Callochia, I think he was close to Di Maulo and that is what got him killed. I know he had that deal with Desjardins and that woman, but I think he went along with Di Maulo to survive after it seemed they were going to take over before Rizzuto came home. Could be wrong of course and I don't think I've seen what was truly the cause of his hit.
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/02/15 01:28 PM

Not sure how accurate it was, but I read an article a couple of months ago that Arcadi, Del Baso and Giordano were to be released between December and February.
Posted By: ForgettableName

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/02/15 03:31 PM

There was another murder in Montreal recently, Domenico Iacono, a 56-year-old who was believed to owe the Mafia money was found dead in the trunk of a car., Because of this most recent killing i decided to update and post the 2008-Present Mafia Murders/Murder Attempts list.


Deaths in the Montreal Mafia War 2008 - Present

Domenico Iacono, 56, Found Dead in Trunk - November 2015
Marco Claudio Campellone, 24, Shot To Death - September 2015
Christopher DeSimone, 24, Shot to Death in GTA, Possibly Unrelated to Montreal Mafia War
Maria Voci, 47, Shot to Death in GTA, Possibly Unrelated to Montreal Mafia War - July 2015
Tonino Callocchia, 53, Shot to Death - December 2014
Ducarme Joseph, 46, Shot to Death - August 2014
Carmine Verduci, Shot to Death in GTA - April 2014
Roger Valiquette, 54, Shot to Death - December 2014
Moreno Gallo, 68, Shot to Death in Mexico - November 2013
Mathieu Vallée, 30, (Associate of Mohamed Awada) Shot to Death - October 2013
Patrick Rivet, 45, Shot to Death - September 2013
Salvatore (Sam) Calautti, 40, Shot to Death in GTA - July 2013
James Tusek, 35, Shot to Death in GTA - July 2013
Jamie Laramee, 37, (Associate of De Vito co-defendant Pietro
D'Adamoa) Shot to Death - July 2013
Cody Laramee, 25, Shot to Death - July 2013
Giuseppe (Ponytail) De Vito, 46, Died in Prison - July 2013
Fernando Pimentel, 36, Shot to Death in Italy - May 2013
Juan Ramon Fernandez, 56, Shot To Death in Italy - May 2013
Tonino Callocchia, 51, Shot and Wounded - February 2013
Vincenzo Scuderi, 49, Shot to Death – January 2013
Gaétan Gosselin, 69, Shot to Death – January 2013
Domenico Facchina, 37, Shot to Death – December 2012
Giuseppe Fetta, 33, Shot and Wounded - December 2012
Emilio Cordileone, 50, Shot to Death – December 2012
Tony Gensale, 43, Shot to Death - November 2012
Mohamed Awada, 47, Shot to Death - November 2012
Joe Di Maulo , 70, Shot to Death – November 2012
Pierre-Paul Fortier, 27, Shot to Death, Possibly Unrelated to Montreal Mafia War – October 2012
Frederick Murdock, 33, Shot to Death, Possibly Unrelated to Montreal Mafia War – October 2012
Vincent Pietrantonio, 53, Shot and Wounded, Possibly Unrelated to Montreal Mafia War - October 2012
Tommy Pietrantonio, 28, Shot and Wounded, Possibly Unrelated to Montreal Mafia War - October 2012
Domenico Arcuri Sr. , 79, Died Suspiciously – October 2012
Ben Zaid Moez Ben Ali, 34, Shot to Death, Possibly an Innocent Civilian – August 2012
Marco Lafratta, 24, Shot and Wounded - August 2012
Riccardo Ruffolo, 34, Shot to Death – August 2012
Chenier Dupuy, 37, Shot to Death, Possibly Unrelated to Montreal Mafia War – August 2012
Lamartine Paul Severe, 42, Shot to Death, Possibly Unrelated to Montreal Mafia War - August 2012
Walter Ricardo Gutierrez, 60, Shot to Death – July 2012
Giuseppe "Joe" Renda, 53, “Missing” – May 2012
Salvatore Silletta, 49, Shot To Death – March 2012
Giuseppe "Closure" Colapelle, 38, Shot To Death – March 2012
Steven Laporte, 39, Shot To Death – March 2012
Antonio (Tony Suzuki) Pietrantonio, 48, Shot and Wounded – December 2011
Salvatore "Sal the Ironworker" Montagna, 40, Shot to Death – November 2011
Matt "Dutch" Garner, 29, Burned to Death, Possibly Unrelated to Montreal Mafia War - November 2011
Einick Gitelman, 28, Burned to Death, Possibly Unrelated to Montreal Mafia War - November 2011
Lorenzo "Larry" Lopresti , 40, Shot To Death – October 2011
Raynald Desjardins, 60, Shot At – September 2011
Antonio Di Salvo, 44, Shot To Death – February 2011
Rita Biasini, 50, Shot At - February 2011
Nicolo Rizzuto, 86, Shot To Death – November 2010
Ennio Bruni, 36, Shot To Death – September 2010
Agostino Cun-trera, 66, Shot To Death – June 2010
Liborio Sciascia, 40, Shot To Death – June 2010
Paolo Renda, 70, “Missing” – May 2010
Ducarme Joseph, 43, Shot At In Suspected Dispute With Montreal Mafia– March 2010
Peter Christopoulos, 27, (Bodyguard of Ducarme Joseph), Shot To Death – March 2010
Nick Rizzuto Jr., 43, Shot To Death – December 2009
Fredrico Del Peschio , 59, Shot To Death - August 2009
Dany de Gregorio, 43, Shot and Wounded – June 2009
Sam Fasulo, 37, Shot To Death - January 2009
Mario (Skinny) Marabella, 40, “Missing” – December 2008
Tony Stocola, 40, Shot to Death - January 2008
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/02/15 06:54 PM

Originally Posted By: cdn_wiseguy
Not sure how accurate it was, but I read an article a couple of months ago that Arcadi, Del Baso and Giordano were to be released between December and February.


Thanks. It should get interesting when they get out for sure.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 01:52 AM

There was another arson last night in Montreal, this time at the Empire cafe on Jean-Talon. Damages were minimal. At least one Molotov cocktail was thrown.

The significance of the cafe is that it is one place the leaders of the so-called mafia roundtable have used for meetings, where Vito Rizzuto was often seen after his return to Montreal, and it was known as a site for cash envelopes pertaining to sports betting and loansharking.

Link to French-language article:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...un-attentat.php

Link to translation (using Google Translate):

Translation
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 02:39 AM

That thread never going to go dead every 3 months fire bombs.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 02:35 PM

A major law-enforcement operation this morning in Quebec has nabbed some important individuals, including Leonardo Rizzuto (Vito's son), Stefano Sollecito (presumed Montreal Mafia leader), Salvatore Cazzetta (head of the Quebec Hells Angels), Gregory Woolley (head of the Syndicates street gang), and Loris Cavaliere (lawyer who has represented many Montreal Mafia figures).

Link:

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...d-mafia-players
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 02:48 PM

WOW, they got Cazzetta on drugs, AGAIN?? And this all but confirms my belief, Leonardo was heavily involved in the ongoings of the Montreal syndicate after the death of his father. And Woolley going down too, this pretty much is what Nicaso alluded to at the end of the Business & Blood book, that this was the new scheme of things, names and everything. Wow...Wonder what this does for Arcadi and those guys. Wow.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 02:48 PM

Here's another link to an English-language article:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/quebec-raids-drugs-organized-crime-1.3325812

Excerpt:

Quebec police conduct major raids linked to drugs, organized crime
Operation targets 'supply and the distribution of drugs in Montreal'

CBC News Posted: Nov 19, 2015 7:15 AM ET Last Updated: Nov 19, 2015 9:40 AM ET

Quebec provincial police say they are conducting major raids this morning linked to drug trafficking and organized crime in the Montreal area.

Loris Cavaliere, a lawyer who has represented members of the Rizzuto crime family, is among those targeted in the raid, a source told CBC.

In all, Bilodeau says they expect to arrest about 40 people....
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 02:51 PM

Thanks for the links, anti.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 02:53 PM

I think Daniel Renaud was the first journalist to break the story about this latest police operation, his story being published at 6:49 am EST. He has since updated the article.

Link:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...me-organise.php
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 02:57 PM

Here's a link to another French-language article:

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/11...ion-de-montreal

The headline below says it all.

Les têtes dirigeantes des Hells, de la mafia et des gangs de rue arrêtées dans une vaste rafle policière
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 03:01 PM

The French-language item to which I've linked below has profiles of four of the key people arrested.

http://www.journaldequebec.com/2015/11/19/qui-sont-les-4-principaux-prevenus
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 03:03 PM

Here's another link to a French-language article about the operation:


http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/montr...-montreal.shtml
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 03:06 PM

And here's one more:

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2015/11/19/vaste-operation-policiere-contre-le-crime-organise
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 03:11 PM

Here's a link to an English-language article:

http://globalnews.ca/news/2349542/police-raids-across-montreal-target-organized-crime/
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 03:38 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
I think Daniel Renaud was the first journalist to break the story about this latest police operation, his story being published at 6:49 am EST. He has since updated the article.

Link:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...me-organise.php


In another update to Renaud's article, it has been revealed that Mom Boucher, the former head of the Hells Angels Quebec, was arrested in his prison cell this morning.

The reason? Suspicion that he participated in a plot to murder Raynald Desjardins, who of course is also in jail.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 07:10 PM

Paul Cherry has more details arising from today's law-enforcement operation dubbed "Project MAGOT and MASTIFF" ("opération MAGOT et MASTIFF" in French).

Leonardo Rizzuto seems to be identified as a co-leader of the Montreal Mafia. Mom Boucher and his daughter appear to have been in communication with Syndicates leader Gregory Woolley, a one-time bodyguard for Boucher, about the plot to kill Desjardins.

Link to Cherry's article:

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...d-mafia-players

Link to a chart published by the Sûreté du Québec (SQ):

http://www.sq.gouv.qc.ca/actualites/2015/2015-11-19_001_magot.pdf
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 07:17 PM

Holy crap, I knew it. Never imagined him being this deeply involved but wow. This seems to be a big bust. I know it's still early Anti, and nothing is clear or certain yet, but would you rank this bust, from what you know, alongside Operation COLISEE?


Judging from the recent article posted, it seems like with the arrest of Cavaliere, at least from what that article is assuming, that they may have had a wiretap in his office and these guys got caught up in a Stanfa-esque investigation. I mean where else would they get information aside from top informants, that Mom Boucher was involved in the plot, along with the mafia to murder Desjardins in prison? Wiretaps, there are other outlets, I suppose. But I'm just going with what I think is the most obvious....This is getting interesting.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 07:21 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Holy crap, I knew it. Never imagined him being this deeply involved but wow. This seems to be a big bust. I know it's still early Anti, and nothing is clear or certain yet, but would you rank this bust, from what you know, alongside Operation COLISEE?


Let's wait and see how much evidence was amassed and what the quality of it is.

Link to another English-language article:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/quebec-raids-drugs-organized-crime-1.3325812
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 07:47 PM

Here are links to additional English-language articles:

http://www.torontosun.com/2015/11/19/arr...nd-street-gangs

https://news.vice.com/article/cops-decap...in-one-big-bust

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/montreal-police-raids-2015-organized-crimes-1.3325855

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/nati...rticle27358700/
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 07:56 PM

I officially eat my words Sinatra about Leonardo and you was right. Thanks again anti for keeping us updated.

Wow, Leonardo went way back in time to try and kill Raynald. I figured he took the plea to stay behind bars and to think he was safe, but obviously not. I imagine if the word is out someone will be ready to shank his ass.

I also think this proves that it is VERY plausible that the Rizzuto's were behind the prison poisoning of De Vito as well.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 08:55 PM

so what charges is vito son chrged with? the plot to kill ray d.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 08:57 PM

just read a article by vice that guy mom the hells angle gets released from prison in 2022 shit the laws up there are so laxed. he would be on death row down here.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 08:59 PM

No pmac, Mom Boucher will never get out. He's serving life now.

Yes Leonardo was charged with conspiracy to murder, drug conspiracy and probably money laundering and gangsterism. Too early to know what kind of case they have though.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/15 10:55 PM

Yea, I definitely think the Rizzuto's were behind De Vito's death. Even before this, I believed that. I'm waiting to see if there's any news on wiretaps, because if there is, I'd bet money that a lot of them come from the lawyers office, which could mean that the stuff on those tapes can write a book. lol

And Dix, lol, I really didn't mean to brag, man, it's just nice to be right sometimes. lol
Posted By: Tony_Pro

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/20/15 12:46 AM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Yea, I definitely think the Rizzuto's were behind De Vito's death. Even before this, I believed that. I'm waiting to see if there's any news on wiretaps, because if there is, I'd bet money that a lot of them come from the lawyers office, which could mean that the stuff on those tapes can write a book. lol

And Dix, lol, I really didn't mean to brag, man, it's just nice to be right sometimes. lol


Do they have attorney-client priviledge in Canada like we do in the states? If they were meeting thinking they were in the clear and the government is going to somehow get that waved on a anti-mafia measure, well damn things are going to get wild.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/20/15 02:29 AM

Originally Posted By: Tony_Pro
Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Yea, I definitely think the Rizzuto's were behind De Vito's death. Even before this, I believed that. I'm waiting to see if there's any news on wiretaps, because if there is, I'd bet money that a lot of them come from the lawyers office, which could mean that the stuff on those tapes can write a book. lol

And Dix, lol, I really didn't mean to brag, man, it's just nice to be right sometimes. lol


Do they have attorney-client priviledge in Canada like we do in the states? If they were meeting thinking they were in the clear and the government is going to somehow get that waved on a anti-mafia measure, well damn things are going to get wild.



And article posted in this thread suggests that they may have been what happened. That they met under the assumption of the "attorney-client" priviledge thing.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/20/15 06:14 PM

Okay, new updates:

- This investigation was started in January 2013, a month after Vito Rizzuto died.

- Both Leonardo & Stefano are said by law enforcement to be the ones who took over the family after Vito died.

- Leonardo Rizzuto & Stefano Sollecito are alleged to have been the suppliers of narcotics to the Hells Angels and the other street gangs in Montreal.

- Gregory Wooley is alleged to be by law enforcement, as Nicaso always said, the link between the Montreal Mafia & The Hells Angels, as well as the street gangs.

- Cazzetta is accused and charged with distilling the illegal proceeds and collecting street taxes for the milieu.

- As I suspected yesterday, Lloris Cavaliere's arrest is in relation to him allowing his law office to be the safe haven of this triumvirate of Organized Crime. His office was used as a meeting spot to plan and plot criminal acts, which he actively participated in. Cavaliere is also suspected of being a long time member of the Rizzuto Family.


Mannnn, if it turns out they had that place tapped...


Oh, and I have yet to learn of Leonardo's or Stefano's or the Montreal Mafia period, being involved in the Desjardin's murder plot. Thats not to say they weren't involved, but none of the articles have mentioned that yet. An article by the National Post had an article and it stated that Mom Boucher, through an female messenger, plotted Desjardins along with Gregory Wooley. Messages were exchanged through the female, from Boucher, who then left the prison visits, back to the streets of Montreal and delivered said messages to Wooley. In the articles terms, Wooley then "executed" those messages. That could mean anything from using his own people and telling no one outside of those involved, or he could've recruited the help of the Montreal Mafia. I suspect more about that will be revealed later on, obviously.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/20/15 07:59 PM

Sinatra you have every right to brag lol As for De Vito I agree, once I heard it was poisoning I thought Vito had something to do with it. I think this kind of confirms it as I imagine Boucher has a lot of sway in prison.

You're right in that Leonardo/Stefano is not listed in the murder plot so far but I seriously doubt Boucher would go after Desjardins unless he had their backing. We have to remember the HA's and the Rizzuto's have always had a history together ever since the war between them and the Rock Machine was stopped. I just can't see them going after Desjardins "alone". It's also been thought that them and the gangs have been hitters for the Rizzuto's as well so it's plausible.

Sinatra have you ever seen the Rizzuto tapes? Montreal Gazette has them online where Vito and Leonardo was on tape talking but it wasn't anything incriminating though. Surely they had Cavaliere's office tapped.

As for lawyer/client privilege, yes they have it in Canada. I think that is the main reason Leonardo became a lawyer to get that right and to keep the RCMP off of them. I know police can tap a lawyer's office, but I think they have to prove they are not meeting for a consult or something. I've seen it done in the states before but I vaguely remember how it was done.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/20/15 10:10 PM

Dixie, they can only wire the lawyers office if they know that they can prove that criminal acts are being conspired within the place. I saw this mentioned in the Stanfa book, but basically they would've had to have had a previous wiretap somewhere else which proved to them that Cavaliere's law office was being used in that manner, only then can they wire the place up. That's if it's like our lawyer/client privilege law here in the states.

You are certainly right about Leonardo/Stefano's possible involvement in the plot to murder Desjardins. I've only really learned that Boucher was supposed to be persona non grata with the Hell's. So if that's true, which I don't really know now since the reportings of his involvement with Wooley. But if it's true, he would've needed some extra muscle, the Rizzuto clan could've supplied that. They're involvement is clearly possible and I wouldn't doubt it at all.

And I think I've heard those tapes. Are one of them of Vito talking to some guy about his car being stolen and him telling the guy he got the car back in another call?
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/20/15 11:17 PM

Yea the Stanfa case is where I remember it from. Thanks to reminding me. I'm pretty sure their law is almost the same to ours, we will see for sure.

I think the HA's put up a public face that Boucher is not involved but like you said with him and Wooley talking he definitely still has some standing on the street.

Yep you've heard the tapes then. The one you are talking about I forget who it was, but someone stole his Escalade and he called Vito to get it back and of course Vito got it back.....lol. Don't blame the guy
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/15 02:00 AM

Link to Éric Thibault's article "Déjà des aspirants pour mener la mafia et les Hells":

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/11/20/deja-des-aspirants-pour-mener-la-mafia-et-les-hells

He speculates about who are seen as successors to those who were arrested in the latest law-enforcement operations. Sources tell him that Francesco Arcadi and Lorenzo Giordano, who are both still in jail, are seen as potential leaders of the Montreal Mafia.
Posted By: BlackFamily

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/15 03:21 AM

@ SinatraClub

Great posting on the update. Where does the 67 Gang fits in the picture? After their leader got killed its rarely any update on them.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/15 05:37 PM

I still say the jury is still out on whether Frank Arcadi is killed or not. I just don't see Rizzuto/Sollecito giving up power to Arcadi after his disastrous run as boss the first go around. Plus, does Arcadi show up thinking he's the man?

Still many questions up there and not enough answers right now.
Posted By: Scalish

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/15 06:14 PM

Arcadi is so arrogant that he will come out thinking he is the man. That has never changed he also thought he was the man.

They should place him as boss when he comes out and allow him to be the fall guy while they really run it behind the scenes, he is so into the power he would go for it. And from what I heard Arcadi is not the sharpest tool in the shed.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/22/15 07:00 PM

I'm not sure everyone would follow suit though, that's the biggest question. Many will remember what things were like under him when Vito was away. So it will be interesting for sure.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/23/15 04:39 AM

Indeed, Dixie. According to Antonio Nicaso, he had lost some trust among the Sicilian bunch because of his Calabrian origin and being too chummy at times with the guys from Ontario & Toronto. Of course this is all speculation, but after seeing much of what Nicaso once wrote in his book and articles actually play out this last past week or so, it's interesting to think about and to see how this situation plays out. The only thing is, who will be around from the younger administration that was just locked up, that will have the proper backing to go against Arcadi & possibly Giordano. One interesting name that hasn't popped up in these sweeps yet, and we have to find out if he will be at all, is Nicola Spagnolo. Alleged by other reporters to have been the third head of leadership at the supposed management table.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/03/15 03:51 PM

Lorenzo Giordano is going to be released in several days.

Link to French-language article:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...afia-libere.php
Posted By: mike68

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/03/15 05:31 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Lorenzo Giordano is going to be released in several days.

Link to French-language article:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...afia-libere.php


Interesting, I wonder who took out the contract on him in 2011?
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/03/15 06:22 PM

He will still be on tight restrictions and be in a halfway house so he's not fully out and ready to rub elbows just yet though.
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/05/15 12:40 AM

Update on the earlier arrests in montreal.

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...rict-conditions
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/10/15 03:30 PM

Molotov-cocktail attacks on two establishments in Montreal overnight.

Links to French-language articles:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ils-molotov.php

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2015/12/10/montreal-deux-commerces-vises-par-des-engins-incendiaires
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/10/15 04:27 PM

When I finished reading the story about the Molotov cocktails, I clicked on a link that was said to be posted 4 hours ago.

My French is just mediocre, and google translate wasn't the greatest. But it looks as though the story suggests that the arrest of Sollecito and Leonardo Rizzuto saved their lives because of a threat on their lives.

Hopefully my translation wasn't way off, but if that's what the story implies, my guess would be that Arcadi, Del Baso and Giardano are laying ground work for their return.

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2015/12/10/les-tetes-de-rizzuto-et-sollecito-mises-a-prix
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/10/15 04:30 PM

And Lorenzo Giodano is out of jail.

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2015/12/09/un-membre-de-la-mafia-en-liberte

I think there will be a lot of action in the next few months with Arcadi and Del Baso soon to be released as well
Posted By: mike68

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/10/15 05:31 PM

Originally Posted By: cdn_wiseguy
When I finished reading the story about the Molotov cocktails, I clicked on a link that was said to be posted 4 hours ago.

My French is just mediocre, and google translate wasn't the greatest. But it looks as though the story suggests that the arrest of Sollecito and Leonardo Rizzuto saved their lives because of a threat on their lives.

Hopefully my translation wasn't way off, but if that's what the story implies, my guess would be that Arcadi, Del Baso and Giardano are laying ground work for their return.

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2015/12/10/les-tetes-de-rizzuto-et-sollecito-mises-a-prix


It seems to say that Sollecito was wearing an expensive watch that he himself had previously given to one of his soldiers (Campellone) after Campellone was whacked. I can see why that may not have gone over well.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/11/15 12:15 AM

Lol, article claims Sollecito & Leonardo lacked the seriousness of criminal affairs that they're fathers had.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/11/15 01:15 AM

"Vers la fin du clan Rizzuto à Montréal?"

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2015/12/10/un-regain-de-tension-a-prevoir-dans-la-mafia
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/11/15 02:15 AM

Didn't know Giordano was Calabrian. No wonder he was so close to Arcadi. Kind of interesting as it seems The Montreal Mob always it's Sicilian faction & Calabrian faction. And that Vito was indeed what held them together, and now that he's gone, the Calabrians may be taking over. It's like the Vic Cotroni & Paolo Violi murder scenario, but in reverse.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/11/15 03:33 PM

"L’attentat contre deux cafés italiens envoie un message"

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/12/10/lattentat-contre-deux-cafes-italiens-envoie-un-message
Posted By: SC

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/11/15 04:17 PM

,
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/11/15 10:58 PM

I think ray d sentencing is next week there should be a treasure trove of shit that comes out. But I know nothing about the laws up there so maybe it's kept sealed untill all 6 of the guys charged in his murder plead out.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/11/15 11:00 PM

One more thing. How organized is the montreal mob seems like there drug dealers with zero respect for lcn rules or so called rules. Killing people at there house in front of there wives. It's kinda cartel ish.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/12/15 07:20 PM

Link:

http://www.cjad.com/cjad-news-community/...-montreal-mafia

Bail hearing set for alleged new leaders of Montreal mafia
CJAD News
Posted on 12/12/2015 by Luciano Pipia, Richard Dagenais

Excerpt:

The alleged new leaders of the Montreal mafia have a bail hearing in the new year.

The hearing for Leonardo Rizzuto and Stefano Sollecito will take place over three days starting January 11th.

A publication ban is in effect until at least January 27th....
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/12/15 11:49 PM

Originally Posted By: cdn_wiseguy
When I finished reading the story about the Molotov cocktails, I clicked on a link that was said to be posted 4 hours ago.

My French is just mediocre, and google translate wasn't the greatest. But it looks as though the story suggests that the arrest of Sollecito and Leonardo Rizzuto saved their lives because of a threat on their lives.

Hopefully my translation wasn't way off, but if that's what the story implies, my guess would be that Arcadi, Del Baso and Giardano are laying ground work for their return.

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2015/12/10/les-tetes-de-rizzuto-et-sollecito-mises-a-prix


That is interesting. I wished they would have went on about "who" was supposed to kill them. I would assume Desjardins before I would Arcadi. But who knows at this point?
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/13/15 03:05 AM

Ya I agree Dixie. It reminds me of 5 years ago when it was really hard to judge who was on what side.

In this case it's hard to say. On one hand, Arcadi was close to vito and helped run things when vito went to jail. Not to mention that he ran things with Rocco Sollecito. So it wouldn't be out of the realm of possibility that he works with the current leadership of Leonardo and Stefano Sollecito due to past connections and the fact that he, Giordano and Del Baso were still getting a cut of profits while in prison. On the other hand, he has made it known that he wants power. Maybe he wants all the power, and it was mentioned previously that he made frequent trips to Toronto which made the Sicilians uneasy. Maybe he was building alliances for this eventuality.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/13/15 07:54 PM

It does remind you of that. Who and what are attacking the Rizzuto's. Seems like another mob war of some kind is coming yet again. Against who? Nobody knows at this point.
Posted By: Homers77

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/13/15 08:47 PM

Does anybody have a list or chart of what the two sides would be ?

For instance - Leonardo and stefano have the following key lieutenants and 20 soldiers from this area of Montreal. They control the construction industry and have video poker machines.

Arcadi has the following key lieutenants and 30 soldiers from here. They control the drug routes and loansharking.

That was all made up but if someone has the real summary that would be very interesting!
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/15 05:02 PM

Originally Posted By: pmac
One more thing. How organized is the montreal mob seems like there drug dealers with zero respect for lcn rules or so called rules. Killing people at there house in front of there wives. It's kinda cartel ish.



They're more than just drug dealers, if killing people in front of their homes shows zero respect for LCN rules, then Montreal has never been a stickler for the rules. That much is evident by how they usurped their Bonanno superiors and started to be more of their own family. American LCN rules, they probably care little for, but they've always operated like and followed similar patterns to the Sicilian Mafia. And guys have been getting killed on their doorsteps for centuries out there in the Montreal Mob.


And I don't think Raynald Desjardin's is plotting any murders right now. I know he's capable, but I don't think it's him who'd be targeting Rizzuto & Sollecito. Desjardins has his own problems with the Hells Angels and guys loyal to Mom Boucher. I think the answer is the most obvious one. And in the one of those articles which mentions a supposed plot on Rizzuto & Sollecito, they clearly state that it comes from within, meaning, it's coming from within the Montreal Mafia, not from anyone else. And it clearly said that guys were unhappy with their leadership. I'd point more towards Arcadi, Giordano & Del Balso than I would Desjardins.
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/15 07:13 PM

I'd love to see what the sides look like as well, but I think it would be a guess at best at this point. I don't think it's even a given that there are only two sides.

An important starting point might be to know where the major players stood during the original attempted overthrow of the Rizzuto's.
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/15 07:23 PM

Sinatra club, I agree and would lean more towards the Arcadi group as well, but I wouldn't lean that way with much confidence. I think there's a lot of possibilities. To play devil's advocate, the article mentions "internal", but I don't think that necessarily excludes Desjardins. I would consider him/his group as internal as well. I'm not 100% sure, but was the old Cotroni group and DeVito's group not working with Desjardins during the initial attempted overthrow of the Rizzuto's? would they be strong enough and maybe make one last grab for power before Arcadi gets out? Probably not, but just throwing it out there.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/15/15 03:44 AM

I don't know about the activity of Desjardin's group since he's been in prison, but at most "internal" could mean within the overall milieu and not just the Montreal Mob. When you consider that, and the fact that Desjardin's & his camp have no recent reported links with the Montreal underworld, I don't see it coming from him.

And part of the recent bust involving Leonardo Rizzuto, Stefano Sollecito & Gregory Woollery has Mom Boucher making an request for Desjardins life. Both of those men are on the inside, personally, if I were Desjardins, I'd have more important, immediate things to worry about. But you never know.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/11/16 02:56 AM

Bail hearing set to start Monday for alleged Mafia leaders

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...-mafia-leaders/
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/11/16 07:15 PM

"Legal questions from defence jeopardize start of bail hearing for Leonardo Rizzuto and Stefano Sollecito"

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...efano-sollecito
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/13/16 01:15 AM

"Alleged Mafia leader Leonardo Rizzuto faces nine new criminal charges"

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...riminal-charges
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/13/16 02:12 AM

Man, Leonardo. He sure did have his hands dirty.
Posted By: slumpy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/13/16 06:00 PM

All they confirmed of the nine were possession of cocaine and two unlicensed firearms, or am I missing something?
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/13/16 06:03 PM

Nah, you're not missing anything, that's all the article confirmed were those three charges.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/13/16 09:04 PM

He was in possession of coke? Surely he wasn't that dumb?
Posted By: slumpy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/13/16 09:20 PM

That's what the article said, enough to be charged with possession, but not trafficking. If you're a drug addict, then it's probably worth the risk as far as he's concerned... Or he was just excessively unlucky to be caught while using casually.

Possession in Canada doesn't really carry much of a consequence anyway. I was once caught by police with a pocket full of acid and ludes and all they did to me was stick me in the drunk tank (I hadn't even gotten high yet) and confiscate my drugs. They cut me loose the next morning without so much as a stern talking to. But I was also, like, 17 at the time and not a mafia boss, so, there's that.

(I don't do any drugs these days save for the occasional joint)
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/13/16 11:01 PM

I wonder if that drug possession charge was to make him look bad. Especially when you hold the top position whereby you have to make sound decisions and how will the elder made guys view this; or am I old fashion?
Posted By: slumpy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/14/16 12:22 AM

Hard to say, but it definitely doesn't make him look good.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/15/16 06:20 PM

According to Félix Séguin's most recent Le Journal de Montréal article, Sergio Piccirilli was informed last weekend by the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (SPVM) that the Montreal Mafia has a murder contract out on him.

Here's the article link:

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/01/14/la-mafia-met-la-tete-dun-influent-motard-a-prix

Given Piccirilli and Salvatore Cazzetta's well-known friendship, the alliance of the Hells and mafia may be fragile at the moment--recall that Cazzetta is essentially the face of the Angels in the Montreal area if not all of Quebec.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/15/16 11:01 PM

Hmmm, that could be interesting.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/15/16 11:05 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
Hmmm, that could be interesting.


That's one word to describe the situation. :-)
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/19/16 11:36 PM

Link top Paul Cherry's latest article in the Montreal Gazette:

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...ume-next-month/

"Bail hearing for two alleged heads of the Mafia will resume next month"
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 02/13/16 01:25 AM

"Influential Montreal Mafia leader to be released soon"

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/influential-montreal-mafia-leader-to-be-released-soon
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 02/13/16 01:35 AM

Damn, three years in a halfway house. Jeez.
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 02/24/16 02:04 PM

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...aine-in-arizona

I didn't realize Del Baso had a brother, but nabbed for drugs.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 02/24/16 09:30 PM

Damn, 62 keys? I don't think he will like his sentence here.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 04:36 PM

Lorenzo Giordano was shot at in the parking lot of the gym he frequents in Laval (north of Montreal).

Link:

"Un important lieutenant de la mafia montréalaise atteint par balles à Laval"

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...les-a-laval.php
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 05:07 PM

Some media outlets are reporting that Giordano succumbed to his injuries; however, his death has not been confirmed by the province's police, the Sûreté du Québec.
Posted By: mike68

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 05:34 PM

Hooooly sh$t!!!!

It is back on like a mother bleeper in Montreal. Was he one of the high ranking guys who just got out of jail? Where does/did he fit?
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 05:39 PM

Who again was he in the scheme of things a rizzuto guy? I remember his name always coming up. I know there lcn but they function like cartel. All over drugs. I give it to some of the NY family's they keep there eyes on the legit shit. Unions. Trash and gambling. I no Vito started his inroads to the construction biz but his whole family was destroyed by drugs. There fighting Haitians street gangs bikers and other street guys. That's the complete opposite of organized crime. My last point I still think they were a satellite operation of the NYC family just really big and drugs did them in. I would guess every made guy that was connected to the bonanno family is dead today like wiped out.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 06:23 PM

^^^^
The Sûreté du Québec has confirmed Lorenzo Giordano's death.

See slide 15 of the file to which I've linked below--the slide shows how the RCMP viewed Giordano back in 2006.

https://www.ceic.gouv.qc.ca/fileadmin/Fichiers_client/centre_documentaire/Piece_10P-123.pdf
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 06:37 PM

Damnnnnn...Giordano just came home. If the words are true about Arcadi, Del Balso & him possibly being the ones who wanted back in on the leadership, then it seems as if Leonardo & Stefano still hold some rank on the outside.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 06:41 PM

Finally. An English-language article about Giordano's murder this morning:

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...our-multisports
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 06:49 PM

This is getting nuts. And people really find it hard to see why the Montreal Mafia is often compared to the Godfather and the Corleone Family.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 08:05 PM

You join the mob up there you have a life expectancy of 1 to 3 yrs on the street. I would pass join the bikers. I wonder of the last 50 murders we now a hand full were made guys in the bonanno family if it was from galante rustelli or Massino days. If these guys are inducted lcn. Cause that would just make the old saying a made guy untouchable because up there they don't give 2 shits. What could this guy have done he's been out of jail 2 months and was in prison I'm guessing 5 yrs before. And don't they have cameras. You shoot someone in any city in mass your likely on cam. And we have these shot spotters everywhere so a gunshot pops off the whole station rushing to the scence. Get with the technology Canada.
Posted By: GangstersInc

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 08:44 PM

Some more background on Giordano's violent yet rich past: http://gangstersinc.ning.com/profiles/blogs/another-mob-boss-whacked-in-montreal-mafia-gangland-hit
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 09:20 PM

Originally Posted By: pmac
You join the mob up there you have a life expectancy of 1 to 3 yrs on the street. I would pass join the bikers. I wonder of the last 50 murders we now a hand full were made guys in the bonanno family if it was from galante rustelli or Massino days. If these guys are inducted lcn. Cause that would just make the old saying a made guy untouchable because up there they don't give 2 shits. What could this guy have done he's been out of jail 2 months and was in prison I'm guessing 5 yrs before. And don't they have cameras. You shoot someone in any city in mass your likely on cam. And we have these shot spotters everywhere so a gunshot pops off the whole station rushing to the scence. Get with the technology Canada.


Not going to get into this again, but the Rizzutos aren't Bonannos, neither is any other current member of the Montreal Mafia. And you're being naive if you think that Montreal doesn't have cameras. If you read the English article it says that the gym had cameras and that the authorities closed the place off to observe them and question the witnesses. You're also off the mark in your last comment about the Rizzutos/Montreal Mob not being LCN because they focus too much on drugs and were in wars with biker gangs and street gangs and other drug cartels. For the most part they weren't. In the Rizzutos case, they're links to the drug cartels in South America and Sicily made them the suppliers of the drugs the bikers and street gangs in Montreal sold. The Rizzutos have always been heavily intertwined with the Hells Angels, to the point where Salvatore Gervasi, son of Rizzuto soldier (according to some sources) Paolo Gervasi, was selling drugs for a rival biker gang, the Rock Machine, drugs that didn't come from the HA or the Rizzuto connection, and he was killed for it after refusing to stop, after being asked by Rizzuto members under the request of the Hells Angels. Its what led Paolo Gervasi to back away from the Rizzuto camp. Most of the Rizzutos conflicts were internal, even in the case of the Blues and Ducarme Joseph, after Vito was in prison, they were most likely acting on the orders of Salvatore Montagna and Tony Magi.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 09:35 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Originally Posted By: pmac
You join the mob up there you have a life expectancy of 1 to 3 yrs on the street. I would pass join the bikers. I wonder of the last 50 murders we now a hand full were made guys in the bonanno family if it was from galante rustelli or Massino days. If these guys are inducted lcn. Cause that would just make the old saying a made guy untouchable because up there they don't give 2 shits. What could this guy have done he's been out of jail 2 months and was in prison I'm guessing 5 yrs before. And don't they have cameras. You shoot someone in any city in mass your likely on cam. And we have these shot spotters everywhere so a gunshot pops off the whole station rushing to the scence. Get with the technology Canada.


Not going to get into this again,


Followed by getting into it again. whistle
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 09:55 PM

Nah, just stating what myself and other members have repeatedly backed up through multiple sources. And I wasn't even speaking on the past, I'm talking about today. I dont think theres a question that today, those links are severed. But argue with yourself if you like, my man.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 10:01 PM

Wow, this is a pretty substantial hit up there.

I think this explains if the Arcadi faction is in good standing or not....
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 10:16 PM

The biggest question I think is, is this from the Leonardo Rizzuto/Stefano Sollecito camp, and a message to Arcadi. Or are there others we have yet to hear about who also want control. I don't see it being from Ontario, although that's also possible. And I don't see it being any sort of remnant of the Desjardins/De Vito group, when Desjardins really has his own problems to worry about right now.

This also puts my theory of the Calabrians regaining control into a tailspin.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 10:48 PM

I'm sarcastic if you read my posts no big deal. But if these guys are lcn why are they killing each other. Where's all the rules. The whole thing in USA is you can't kill a made guy with out a OK from the boss and the rule kinda what's kept the thing going till present day. That's all. Very interesting.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 10:49 PM

Whose the boss oking all the hits.
Posted By: SonnyBlackstein

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 10:53 PM

Fascinating stuff.

They just don't give a fuck in Montreal.

Thanks to Antimafia and Gangsterinc for their contributions.
Posted By: TheRedZone

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 11:15 PM

Originally Posted By: pmac
I'm sarcastic if you read my posts no big deal. But if these guys are lcn why are they killing each other. Where's all the rules. The whole thing in USA is you can't kill a made guy with out a OK from the boss and the rule kinda what's kept the thing going till present day. That's all. Very interesting.


There's not really anymore LCN, add to that the fact that Montreal, especially since the Rizzuto reign, wasn't a carbon copy of the American LCN and hardly followed their cardinal rules/rites. I'm sure someone is more or less overseeing, driving or approving the hits that we see against the remnants of the Rizzuto regime, but it's more of an italian clique wiping out the remaining competitors of old(I say competitor, but in Giordano's case, revenge makes more sense maybe).
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 11:16 PM

Originally Posted By: pmac
I'm sarcastic if you read my posts no big deal. But if these guys are lcn why are they killing each other. Where's all the rules. The whole thing in USA is you can't kill a made guy with out a OK from the boss and the rule kinda what's kept the thing going till present day. That's all. Very interesting.


They've been killing each other since the 60's. Its really no different from the Sicilian Mafia, who also kill each other, yet they are the original LCN. Montreal has never been comparable to NY. Philly was known for killing each other, Nicky Scarfo pretty much never got an okay from NY to kill other made men, outside of the Chickie Narducci hit. And he killed numerous made guys.
Posted By: mightyhealthy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 11:22 PM

Scarfo was a boss. You don't need permission from NY to kill guys in your own family.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 11:29 PM

And by all accounts Leonardo Rizzuto is a boss, although loosely right now. Vito Rizzuto was a boss. Nick Rizzuto Sr. Was a boss. Thats my point, like Scarfo, they needed no permission to kill within their own borgata. Not only that but Sicilian blood line mattered more to them than rules called upon by NY. And I really don't think those guys cared all that much about what NY had to say post Cotroni. I'm still waiting for an answer as to who gave a French associate, Desjardins, the "okay", to kill a Bonanno acting boss.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 11:46 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Nah, just stating what myself and other members have repeatedly backed up through multiple sources. And I wasn't even speaking on the past, I'm talking about today. I dont think theres a question that today, those links are severed. But argue with yourself if you like, my man.


I'm not arguing, you are. I was simply pointing out your contradiction. And your sources are taken out of context, misinterpret or pulled out of your ass.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/01/16 11:47 PM

According to only you.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/02/16 12:01 AM

Anyway, Arcadi's crew has undoubtedly taken a big hit with the arrest of Girolamo Del Balso like a week ago and this murder. His chances at power aren't looking very good right now.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/02/16 02:55 AM

So is this anything like the Colombo war in the 90tys where you had persico side holding on to the top from prison and the rest of the family backing a new boss on the street? A family split in 2?
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/02/16 03:49 AM

Eh, not really. Somewhat, but not really, as no one knows at this point how much control Leo Rizzuto & Stefano Sollecito actually exert on the street right now. And Arcadi & Co were just released from prison and are in halfway houses. But the Canadian authorities claimed project MAGOT & MASTIF and the arrests of co-bosses Leonardo Rizzuto & Stefano Sollecito, saved their lives as a hit was placed on them from within the Montreal Mafia. Personally, I thought that news strangely coincided with the Calabrian factions (Arcadi, Frank Del Balso & Giordano's) release from prison. So in my personal opinion, I'd have placed them behind the contract on Rizzuto & Sollecitos lives. The difference between the Colombo war is once again, this is all about drugs. Project MASTIF & MAGOT indictments imply that the Rizzuto clan, at least at the time of the arrests, still controlled a large portion of the Montreal drug trade, at least as far as cocaine goes, as opposed to the heroin, Leonardo's father and grandfather became big traffickers of. A RCMP chart released at the time showed that they were at the top of the Montreal underworld, the drugs flowed through the Rizzuto clan, Leonardo Rizzuto & Stefano Sollecito being the facilitators, and throughout the rest of the Montreal Mafia. Then onto the Hells Angels, and then passed down to the street gangs, mainly those under Gregory Woolley's control. It seems those within the Montreal Mafia wanted the spots of Rizzuto & Sollecito. Again, the timing of everything, I'd say it was the old Arcadi crew wanting what they feel they were owed. Its also interesting, to me, that this hit on Giordano came merely a week or so after Girolamo Del Balso, Franceso Del Balso's brother and presumably Giordano ally, is arrested seemingly transporting an massive amount of cocaine. Which may go to show that the Arcadi group were making in-roads into the perhaps formerly Rizzuto controlled drug/cocaine market. A week after his arrest, and Giordano is killed? In my opinion, and definitely dont take my word for it, the Rizzuto/Sollecito group or those loyal to them, let the Arcadi group pull on their own string until they bit themselves on the foot and revealed themselves for what they were, and then struck back.


Sounds real Mario Puzo-esque, but looking at the past of the Montreal Mafia, it seems to be a blueprint for an actual mafia novel.
Posted By: ForgettableName

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 04:43 AM

Sinatra makes some very interesting points, especially regarding the very intriguing timing of Giorlamo Del Balso being busted to Giordano being killed. While I agree with the idea that Arcadi, Del Balso and Giordano have historically been very close and are likely right back into the thick of things since their release from prison, I wonder if perhaps instead of this being a killing attributed to the Rizzuto crime group, it may instead be an inside hit.

Consider this, Del Balso was only released from prison a few weeks ago, only a week or so after that his brother is arrested in America with a quantity that at a minimum will end in well over a decade in prison or not unrealistically life in prison. Perhaps, and this is my own theory, the three aforementioned had just started their new inroads towards mafia supremacy or at least success and in one of their first ventures used one of their most trusted associates (blood is thicker then water after all) to transport a large quantity of cocaine for their first fresh from prison criminal escapade. But it went terribly wrong. Now Del Balso is under the most extreme of scrutiny, and his brother may be never again be a free man. So perhaps Del Balso, being something of a known hot head, decides to have Giordano killed.

Why? Well, for one, it could be pre-emptive, while Del Balso is not known for a soft touch, Giordano is truly a classic psycho gangster, and Giordano could realize that Del Balso would choose to align himself with family and bring the others down, so instead of waiting for Giordano to make a move, Del Balso makes the move first, and now he can rest a bit easier. The other idea is that perhaps Del Balso had no part in his brothers actions and instead it was all the idea of Giordano and Giordano alone to use Girolamo Del Balso for this drug run. Del Balso, in conjuncture with Arcadi possibly, realizes Giordano is a complete fool, ruined his brothers life and is again a loose canon and again, have him whacked.

Just an idea I was batting around, in the end, like most murders up north, we may truly never know.
Posted By: Wilson101

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 02:25 PM

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...our-multisports
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 03:32 PM

Canadian authorities believe Giordano may have been the one behind the threat on Salvatore Cazzetta's life. As the Project MAGOT & Project MASTIF chart showed, Cazzetta was the money man for the Rizzuto/Sollecito facilitated drug group. This is really beginning to look like it may have come from them. I'm not going to say its for sure, but considering everything, to me it's becoming more likely.


And a recently released article says that both Leonardo & Stefano are likely going to be released on bail.


Looks like the tables may have really turned...For their safety, Francesco Arcadi and Francesco Del Balso have been ordered back to prison.


http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...78_section_POS1
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 04:41 PM

Interesting article Ciment,

One thing that surprised me was the mention that liborio [BadWord] was supporting the arcadi group.

As for the giordano murder, I don't think it had anything to do with an internal hit by arcadi/del baso or Toronto. That is a far fetched suggestion. The arcadi group made their warnings before they were released from prison and there was a hit out on rizzuto and sollecito, so to me it looks like rizzuto/sollecito struck first.
Posted By: mike68

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 05:44 PM

If I'm a mobster up there who has made some good money in his life, I'm getting the hell out of Dodge. Nobody is safe up there. Find another place to live and at the worst, check back in a few years to see what the landscape is. This is ridiculous. Pull a Little Carmine Lupertazzi on the Sopranos and say 'I'm out'.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 08:03 PM

There's one thing you seem to neglect or not really understand,especially with the bolded part. Calabrese or Calabrian in Montreal doesn't always means 'Ndrangheta. I don't know if you know that or not, and that's a common misconception other forum members have made when reading articles like that. There IS a Calabrian branch of the Montreal Mafia. Francesco Arcadi is considered to be a part of that Calabrian branch. And Calabrians have been a part of the Montreal Mob since it's inception. Its just like the Controni days, which I mentioned on here before, when Cotroni and Violi ran things, the Calabrese was the power in the Montreal Mob, and it had little to do with Ontario or Toronto 'Ndrangheta.

When Violi died and Cotroni stepped back, the Sicilians (The Rizzutos and their brethren) were the power. It was suspected with the threat on Leonardo & Stefanos arrest and their incarceration, that Arcadi, Del Balso & Giordano were behind the threat, they were due to be released and reportedly wanted their leadership positions back. Perhaps thats what Costa meant when he said the Calabrians were running things. And I'm inclined to believe it was, when you look at the arrest of Girolamo.

According to Project MAGOT & MASTIF, the threats on Desjardins life, were coming from Mom Boucher and Gregory Wooley, not Calabrians. I already mentioned whom I suspect to be behind those of Leonardo & Stefano. And with Arcadi & Del Balso back in prison and Giordano dead, that isnt to say, the Rizzutos or Sicilians are back in power, but that there may be more of a counsel leadership, who simply feel more comfortable with Leonardo & Stefano keeping their positions, or the counsel setting, than seeing Arcadi and his group take control.
Posted By: Giacomo_Vacari

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 09:00 PM

It looks pretty much like Arcadi vs Manno for the leadership postion. In other words it is Calabrians vs. Sicilians. The Rizzuto fraction is backed up by the Bonanno family (Salvatore Catalano), the Cotroni is backed up by the Gambino family (Frank Cali, but stopped when he become more scrutinized by LE, unknown who took over as a conduit) Buffalo was neutral before Dante passed away in 14', don't know who took over that crew, but if is Bruno, then they will support sicilians, if it was Giovanni, then they will support the calabrians. Not talking about Pops crew (which is in support of the Cotroni fraction, due to the Violi family) but different crew in Canada, which Buffalo has two crews up there.
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 09:18 PM

I might be wrong, but I don't see the backing of any u.s. families as playing any role in this.
Posted By: mightyhealthy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 09:29 PM

Buffalo? The fuck? You're dreaming.
Posted By: mightyhealthy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 09:30 PM

Why are people so invested in the idea that American families play a part in Montreal? Does it fulfill some kind of criminal conspiracy fantasy?

Buffalo isn't even a viable family anymore. Now they are backing Canadian factions?
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 10:33 PM

Like someone said and I believe are correct, the Rizzuto faction always had a Calabrian faction. I'm not sure if Arcadi ran that side until Di Maulo was killed when Vito was released. I don't think Di Maulo was that active anymore mind you, but I think more would have easily followed him before they would Arcadi.

I do find it crazy Liborio is with him unless it was a set up? If it was N.Y. I could believe something like that, but most of the time in Montreal family followed family no matter what.

Too bad Del Balso and Arcadi were reported back to prison because things were just now getting interesting again. I imagine things get quiet for now until they get out or go back to a halfway house.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 10:34 PM

My thing with the Americans is when the montealiens go to Florida or Cali they hang out with there friends all lcn. Anyways so that article kinda screwed up translated like my writing. Says Vito inducted a bunch of guys into there family before he died. Probably his kid the lawyer who a few years ago the board said was totally legit but he got his button and went strait Escobar/scarfo ordering hits. The crazy thing no one ever gets caught doing these hits. Its amazing all them screw ups got caught when they killed sal the ironman. That was clearly rookies. And the guy who tried to do a drive by hit on a jet ski that could be a first in north america.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/03/16 11:57 PM

I was basically the only person on the forums who said Leonardo wasn't %100 percent legit nor still doing his legal lawyer thing. Because the articles and investigations weren't supporting it. Guys said I was crazy and didnt know any better, funny how that turned out. Not only that, before Vito died, various authors and retired law enforcement claimed Vito used to have Leonardo actually sit in on select meetings, and him being a lawyer, he was always in tune with aspects of his families business, none of this just happened out of the blue. And why do you assume these guys necessarily travel to Florida or California, when they, especially the Sicilians have or had investments like Cuba and the DR, where Vito normally vacationed at? These guys vacation in places like Mexico, not necessarily US vacation spots. So they really don't have to associate with US mobsters.


And I really doubt there's any US family involvement in this, especially Buffalo. And why Catalano, what's his position in the current Bonanno infrastructure? Last I heard he doesn't even have a crew, he hasn't been mentioned in any cases recently, or reports or anything. Where would he fit in with the current Cammarano Jr. line of order? And we have documented evidence that the Gambinos are involved with the Calabrians in Toronto & Ontario, yet absolutely none for them being involved with Montreal, like at all. Its possible NY is involved, but I don't find it likely, I think thats a reach.


And Montreal is notorious for guys doing hits and not being caught. Was the killer of Nicolo Jr & Sr ever brought to justice? Nope. What about Joe Di Maulo? Nope. What about Paolo Renda? Nope. Joe Renda? Nope. Rocco Violi? Nope. Paolo Gervasi? Nope. Ducarme Joseph? Nope. You have two hits in which guys got caught, and thats because in both cases those involved were using blackberries. And those who shot at Desjardins (the jet ski attempt youre referring to) werent even caught by the law, I believe. Just the bodyguard is sitting in jail now because they found out he lied to the responding officers about not firing his gun, yet shot himself, WITH his gun, to make it appear that the assassins shot him while he was defenseless. Believe it or not, there are places in the 21st century that are adept at this organized drug crime/mafia thing. They just arent in America.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 12:19 AM

Originally Posted By: mightyhealthy
Why are people so invested in the idea that American families play a part in Montreal? Does it fulfill some kind of criminal conspiracy fantasy?

Buffalo isn't even a viable family anymore. Now they are backing Canadian factions?


Believe it or not, from what I've seen from members on here and on the other forums, some guys really have a huge problem with the idea of these guys sustaining their own Crime Family/Organization.
Posted By: SonnyBlackstein

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 01:56 AM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Originally Posted By: mightyhealthy
Why are people so invested in the idea that American families play a part in Montreal? Does it fulfill some kind of criminal conspiracy fantasy?

Buffalo isn't even a viable family anymore. Now they are backing Canadian factions?


Believe it or not, from what I've seen from members on here and on the other forums, so guys really have a huge problem with these guys sustaining their own Crime Family/Organization.


+1000

Buffalo? What a joke.

US 'influence' of candian LCN is fucking non existent. Let alone Buffalo, jeezus.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 02:22 AM

Ya Vito did vacation in Cuba. Growing up in the USA you were taught no one goes to Cuba or Fidel kills you or puts you in jail forever. He's a commie. I think there finaly letting baseball players come in go. I thought Fidel hated mobsters surprised Vito would go there. In my head its like north Korea that idiot student who stole the flag and is crying and begging on TV. Just wouldn't go to dom. Rep. Heard to many bad stories from people who went for the vacay. Won't comment no more on this subject till next week and some over guy gets whackd. Goodnight
Posted By: BlackFamily

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 02:56 AM

Sinatraclub,

The firebombing was/were tied to the Haitians gang. With all the focus on the Rizzutos, Im quite curious on the involvement of Greg Wooley's Syndicate and the conflict with the Reds. I read a few articles about the Blues owning some bars or businesses downtown. Speaking on nobody arrested for the murders of a few Rizzuto's members which possibly could of been the Reds.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 03:17 AM

Rizzutos were aligned with Reds. And when Rizzuto was released from prison and reestablishing himself in the underworld, the Reds was the gang he sat down with and opted to operate with. The Blues reportedly were behind the firebombings and the extortions of Rizzuto owned cafes. Montagna and Tony Magi used them as sort of an extended army of soldiers. They also may have been behind the attempt on Desjardins, at the behest of Montagna, reportedly. Ducarme Joseph was murdered and the Blues were purposely left out of the new alliance set up by Vito post his release from prison. Because it's the Blues and Ducarme Joseph and his Haitians whom are suspected to have been behind the murder of Vito's son, Nick Jr, either on the orders of Tony Magi, or Sal Montagna or both, not The Reds. This again, according to reports and authors like Antonio Nicaso. Gregory Woollery is a full patched member of the Hells Angels now, however he left one of his immediate subordinates in charge of the Reds gangs, whom was also indicted and charged in the Project MAGOT & MASTIF investigations, I forget his name right now though. And Woolley appparently still had immediate contact to the Reds.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 03:21 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
In addition, Giordano allegedly threatened an attempt on the life of at least two other criminals, including one close to the Hells Angels, to settle old conflicts dating back a decade.


They are referring to Sergio Piccirilli.
Posted By: BlackFamily

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 04:30 AM

What of the independent gangs? Also, Is Greg Woolley trying to consolidate the groups into The Syndicate or an umbrella ? How long you think this could continue before another shift in power happens?
Posted By: IvyLeague

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 05:33 AM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub


And Montreal is notorious for guys doing hits and not being caught. Was the killer of Nicolo Jr & Sr ever brought to justice? Nope. What about Joe Di Maulo? Nope. What about Paolo Renda? Nope. Joe Renda? Nope. Rocco Violi? Nope. Paolo Gervasi? Nope. Ducarme Joseph? Nope. You have two hits in which guys got caught, and thats because in both cases those involved were using blackberries. And those who shot at Desjardins (the jet ski attempt youre referring to) werent even caught by the law, I believe. Just the bodyguard is sitting in jail now because they found out he lied to the responding officers about not firing his gun, yet shot himself, WITH his gun, to make it appear that the assassins shot him while he was defenseless. Believe it or not, there are places in the 21st century that are adept at this organized drug crime/mafia thing. They just arent in America.


I think that says more about the relative reach, resources, and competence of American law enforcement compared to Canada and elsewhere in the world than anything.
Posted By: SonnyBlackstein

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 07:59 AM

USA! USA! USA! USA!


Yawn.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 10:59 AM

It's a bizarre thing, really...
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 11:02 AM

I think a lot of guys have only read about the NY mob, and they think the mafia STARTED THERE, and still revolves around NY, when it's always revolved around profit opportunity and power.....
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 11:04 AM

@Black Family

Unless Whooley gets his own connect to the Mexicans, he would have to do what the Hell Angels did;


Wage a street war for control of distribution in the streets....
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 11:16 AM

I honestly read somewhere Catalano went back to Italy....



Also, his power was the Sicilian drug connects, that's dead. I've suspected for awhile that the Rizzutos might be THE STRONGEST Sicilian drug connect left, this is why the Sicilians felt they had to deal with the Spanish guy, Fernandez....
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 01:05 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Firstly,Thank you for your Montreal mafia history lesson 101 which I already know.
Secondly, your the one that neglects and does not understand not me.
Thirdly, you are making up things.Costa was not refering to the Montreal Calabrians.Read and do your research before you write.







Lol, why'd you just switch to this hostile dialect all of a sudden? #1. Giuseppe Costa wasn't from Montreal, he was from Toronto. #2. I assumed you were referring to Montreal since you mentioned your theory that this a coup by Toronto 'Ndranghesti, which is somewhat unlikely at this point. But the point still stands, Calabrian in Montreal, does not mean 'Ndrangheta nor 'Ndrangheta involvement. Guys like Arcadi and Giordano have ALWAYS had relationships with 'Ndranghesti from Ontario and Toronto, and still, a 'Ndrangheta takeover of Montreal Mafia rackets never really happened. Costa was right in the aspect that the 'Ndrangheta is the power in Canada now, I've said that on this forum before, so I don't know what I would need to research on that note. They've also become the most dominant organization in Italy as well, but you don't hear about them moving into Sicily and surrounding areas and taking over Sicilian Mafia rackets, this is somewhat the same situation. Even in the case of Joe Di Maulo, Sal Montagna & Desjardins. These guys didnt accomplish what they did on their own, it was mostly an inside job, but they had some help from Ontario & Toronto gangsters, maybe the same gangsters who aligned themselves with the Rizzutos when Vito was in power. Feeling Vito and the Rizzutos were history, they sided with whom it appeared were the new power, in order to continue the business relationships they had already had, not to takeover. Those guys became history, you dont think those same men then decided to do business with this "table" of sorts or with the co-bosses of Leonardo & Sollecito. Theres really been no evidence of a coup by 'Ndrangheta to try to take over Montreal from the Mafia that's already there. There's still little evidence of it now. Thats all I'm saying.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 04:59 PM

Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I think a lot of guys have only read about the NY mob, and they think the mafia STARTED THERE, and still revolves around NY, when it's always revolved around profit opportunity and power.....


They read about New York and Montreal and know that the history of the two is intertwined. They look at it from a different angle than the ones who are obsessed about this "Sixth Family".

That being said, I believe that the Bonannos washed their hands of Montreal after the Montagna affair. The city has turned into a hornet's nest. I think that the link with the Bonannos died with Rizzuto.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 07:33 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
I am not the one being hostile. Your the one that starts off telling people they do not understand and come across like you know it all. Maybe if you engage in dialogue rather than critizing people you may be taken more serious.
There has been lately more journalists out there theorizing the Toronto angle mendling in Montrea's affairs. Costa in the article mentioned Canada. As far as I know Quebec hasn't separated yet. So it includes Montreal and Toronto. You dismiss journalists of the Journal de Montreal,La Presee and testimony from a turncoat in Calabria who by the way had a brother who was killed in Toronto and is well knowledged of what is going on in Canada.
I have no problems about you reaching a conclusion other than mine, I will respect that. What I ask is that you respect other people opinions as well.


I've only seen one article that puts forth the Toronto theory. And not for nothing, but Laurentian who is somewhat educated on the subject and I believe may be an author himself, found it somewhat unlikely as well. There just isn't enough out there to support it right now. I never once said "nah you're wrong", just that I personally found it unlikely, because as of right now, there isn't anything to support the theory. I haven't seen one Lapresse article that suggest s Toronto 'Ndrangheta takeover since Giordanos shooting. They mentioned Vittorio Mirarchi being a part of the Calabrian cell of the Montreal Mafia, and having strong support from Ontario. So because of that, he shouldnt be excluded from the "next up" conversation. But him becoming boss is unlikely in itself, hes still in prison waiting to face trial for the Sal Montagna murder, and is a part of Desjardins group, which isnt very popular these days amongst the Montreal Underworld. Nor have I seen an article from Journal De Montreal implying it either. And again, I agree with Costa, the Sicilians are no longer the predominant OC group in Canada, nor is the Montreal Mafia for that matter. Its arguably the 'Ndrangheta, however that doesn't mean Costa was saying that the 'Ndrangheta control Montreal.
Posted By: Giacomo_Vacari

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 08:12 PM

The name of the game is money. Perhaps I should have said the remains of the Buffalo Canadian faction. Vito Rizzuto made a lot of connections and did quite a bit of joint venture to start pipelines with other groups and families. Frank Cotroni had done the same thing from the mid 1980s until his death. There is a lot of money to be made in Montreal, and Montreal mobsters who went to prisons in the US, during the 1980s to the early 2000s, have been getting released since everything has been happening in Montreal since the late 2000s. These guys are forgotten by the journalists and Mafia leaders in Montreal, they have made connections while state side or a broad, with other gangs and crime families. Vito was strong cause a lot of incarcerated guy were still loyal to Vito, and passed a long information and joint ventures to their Captains.

I say different about Bonanno, Gambino, and Buffalo roles in Montreal. Salvatore Catalano is said by FBI agents, again by FBI agents that he had returned to Sicily, but that is not what immigration is saying. Salvatore goes back to Carmine Galante, and has a lot of strong connections that are overlooked in Montreal. Frank Cali of the Gambino family had a lot of connections before the bodies started to drop in Montreal, and still does, but this was before he was bumped up to Underboss, plus he maintains contact with Toronto. Finale there is Dante of Buffalo family who I at first thought had retired in 2006, but was still running the crew through his son, while he was meeting with other Canadian mafia leaders, notable those in Montreal. Dante family had and has more connections than Dom Italiano/Joe P crew.
Posted By: SonnyBlackstein

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 08:18 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
the Sicilians are no longer the predominant OC group in Canada, nor is the Montreal Mafia for that matter. Its arguably the 'Ndrangheta, however that doesn't mean Costa was saying that the 'Ndrangheta control Montreal.


Think this is a pretty accurate summation.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 09:12 PM

Salvatore Catalano hasnt been mentioned through testimony, or prosecutors, or informants or FBI affidavits in ANY Bonanno cases in years. The FBI has a pretty good idea of the Bonanno hierarchy, and they've had such knowledge which accounted for multiple changes of guard, and Catalano has not been mentioned in any of them. There's been no mention in any trials of him having a crew or even being involved in any illegal activity within the last two decades, almost. I really don't think he has a hand in anything going on in Montreal, nor does he have enough current status, to "back" anyone. Just think about it, if he was active, his name wouldn't have come up by now in some investigations? Like at all? Any? Fat Tony Rabito was older and released the same year, and his name has come up multiple times in relation to Bonanno activity, just recently last year when he was being visited by Pallazolo, when Pallazolo was attempting to enlist some support against Cammarano Jr. Its been quiet for Catalano. Which is a rarity when it comes to Bonanno Family mob guys.


As said before , there's been no proof of Frank Cali's involvement with Montreal, Ontario? Yes. But none for Montreal. The last known Gambino/Montreal ties, I believe were Joe LoPresti, Nick Sr & Sciascia and the drug traffickers of the Gotti crew.


And Buffalo, is defunct. I'd be willing to consider all this information, if actual evidences, circumstantial or whatever are put forward, though.
Posted By: BlackFamily

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/04/16 10:56 PM

I'm not speaking on Woolley, but the Bo-Gars or the next largest set under the Reds. The leader or high ranking member was killed ( the one who slap Woolley 2x) and a few others killed could seek revenge later on.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/05/16 01:53 AM

There is literally one paragraph in that article that alludes to some Toronto mobsters being arrested in Montreal over the holidays. The translation seems to be questioning if they were there to protect some of their interests after the arrests of Rizzuto, Sollecito, Cazzetta, Cavaliere and Wooley. But then gives the impression that even Montreal criminals think the crime in Montreal is from others outside of Toronto.


Leonardo Rizzuto & Stefano Sollecito ordered to remain behind bars until the end of their court proceedings, after failing to convince a judge that they'll refrain from criminal activity if released on bail. Stefano didnt physically attend latest bail hearing, he was present via video. Said to be suffering bad from cancer, apparently looks worse than he has before. Article below...



Leonardo Rizzuto and Stefano Sollecito, who were detained on 19 November, the day of the operation Magot who beheaded Montreal organized crime, failed to convince the judge to restore their liberty pending further proceedings.

Leonardo Rizzuto, 46, youngest son of the late Mafia boss Vito Rizzuto and Stefano Sollecito, 48, son of Rocco Sollecito, a former lieutenant of Vito Rizzuto, are accused of gangsterism and conspiracy to traffic cocaine. Rizzuto also faces counts of possession of a weapon and possession of cocaine.

After presiding ten-day survey released spaced during the months of January and February, the Daniel Bédard judge of the Court of Québec concluded that the two men have failed to shift the burden of proof , to ensure attendance at proceedings and to demonstrate that their release would not represent a danger to the public or would not affect the confidence of that public in the administration of justice.

A publication ban prevents us from disclosing the details of the evidence and testimony heard during the investigation. For health reasons, Stefano Sollecito has not moved to the courthouse in Montreal. He followed the hearing from his prison in videoconferencing. Visibly suffering, he got up several times during the hour and a quarter that Bédard judge has to make a very substantial judgment.

The magistrate took the opportunity to deplore the length of the survey release, "which is far from a procedure that wants expeditiously", he has said.

The Magot-Mastif operation was conducted by the Joint Regional squad of the Sûreté du Québec, in collaboration with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the SPVM. It resulted in the arrest of forty individuals whose criminal lawyer Loris Cavaliere, the leading member of the Hells Angels, Salvatore Cazzetta and gang leader Gregory Woolley.

A member of the Hells Angels Nomads Ontario, Carlos Fernandez, and members of the Reds, club supporter of the Hells Angels were also arrested. Cazzetta and Fernandez have also failed in their attempt to obtain their freedom while Gregory Woolley has not requested it.

Loris Cavaliere was released under heavy conditions, including that of remaining at home round the clock seven days a week.

The procedures were postponed to 15 March.


http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ent-detenus.php



English version of article, all credits to Laurentian for being the first to post these over on the Black Hand forum.



http://montrealgazette.com/news/judge-denies-bail-for-alleged-montreal-mafia-kingpins


A Quebec Court justice denied bail Friday to reputed Montreal Mafia bosses Leonardo Rizzuto and Stefano Sollecito.

The men have been behind bars since Nov. 19, when they were arrested and subsequently charged with cocaine trafficking and gangsterism.

Rizzuto, the 46-year-old son of the late Mafia boss Vito Rizzuto, also faces weapons and cocaine possession charges. He seemed unfazed by Justice Daniel Bédard’s ruling, nodding and smiling to a group of men in the front row of the courtroom after hearing the decision.

The 48-year-old Sollecito — Vito Rizzuto’s former lieutenant — appeared via video conference from a detention centre. Sollecito is battling cancer and could be heard writhing in pain several times during the proceedings.

Bédard presided over bail hearings for 10 days, hearing arguments from Crown prosecutors and defence attorneys before handing down his ruling. The defence’s arguments did not meet the burden of proof required to show their clients’ release wouldn’t present a danger to the public or undermine the public’s confidence in the judicial system.


The bail hearing came three days after Mafia member Lorenzo Giordano was shot to death Tuesday morning in a Laval parking lot. Giordano was part of an interim leadership committee that ran the Rizzuto clan in the early 2000s.

He’d been released from prison only months earlier after serving most of a 15-year sentence for gangsterism.

The execution of a former Rizzuto enforcer, according to Mafia experts, is indicative of a new period of instability within the mob. Since Vito Rizzuto died of cancer in 2013, there’s been a power vacuum in Montreal’s underworld, with rival factions vying for control of the city’s lucrative drug trade.

Rizzuto and Sollecito were rounded up along 44 others on Nov. 19 as part of the Sûreté du Québec’s Project Magot investigation. The raid dealt a serious blow to the Mafia, removing its leadership.

Defence attorney Loris Cavaliere, 61, was also scooped up in the raid, but has since been released on bail.

Police say the raid also hurt the Hells Angels and street gangs, according to police, who say they’ve established links between the three groups. The Montreal police and RCMP collaborated in the investigation, which began in January 2013.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/07/16 12:47 AM

The funeral-home visitation for Lorenzo Giordano will be at the Rizzuto-owned Complexe funéraire Loreto http://www.complexeloreto.com/avis-de-deces.php?action=view&id=2142
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/07/16 01:23 AM

Hmm,possible sign he was still a Rizzuto ally?


Actually, Anti, do you have any idea whom is the proprietor of the funeral home now, and how deep or strong is their current Rizzuto affiliation? I know its commonly said that the home is Rizzuto owned and I've always believed it was. But I wonder if they just cater to anyone willing to pay for service as opposed to having a specific alignment either way.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/07/16 03:18 PM

^^^^
It's not a question of rumours--the Registraire des entreprises in Quebec is a business registry for the province that allows you to search for corporate information for numbered companies.

Below is a link to an Evernote item I created on September 1, 2012:

https://www.evernote.com/shard/s229/sh/9...d5cdc90e856ad86

Below is a link to an Evernote item I created today from four separate Evernote notes also created today. That is, I merged the notes into one:

https://www.evernote.com/shard/s229/sh/5...6ccfb3affab1c94

Compare the earlier item from 2012 with the most recent one from today.

Freddy Ruscitti has long been listed in the corporate information for the business entities for the funeral homes owned by Rizzuto family members, going as far back as when the funeral home was still on Beaubien in St. Leonard (St-Léonard). I don't believe Ruscitti is either Sicilian or Calabrian, as the surname is distinctly from the Abruzzo region.

As to what Giordano's funeral-home visitation at the Loreto means, I don't know how to interpret such facts anymore. Frank Cotroni's visitation was there in 2004; the visitation for Giuseppe De Vito's murdered daughters was held there in 2009; and the visitation for De Vito himself was held there.

Posters may recall the kerfuffle when the imprisoned Raynald Desjardins requested and received a letter from Ruscitti shortly after Jos Di Maulo's death that stated the Di Maulo family had never asked for Di Maulo's visitation to be held at the Loreto, nor that the Loreto had refused the Di Maulos' desire for visitation to be held there. Writing in La Presse, David Santerre reported that the Di Maulo family's choice to have the visitation at the Magnus Poirier home was interpreted by some observers (of organized crime) as a reflection of tensions between the Rizzuto crime group and the deceased Di Maulo's associates. See http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-tensions.php.

Those in the Montreal area who are regular folk and happen to be paesani of the Rizzutos do not have a choice when making funeral arrangements in advance or upon the death of a relative--as far as the selection of the funeral home goes, the visitation has to be at the Loreto. End of story. I'm beginning to wonder, when the Rizzuto organization has held sway all these decades, whether there has been some similar underworld protocol for the funeral-home visitation with respect to Italian crime figures in, or associated with, the Montreal Mafia--regardless of tensions.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/07/16 08:00 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
^^^^
It's not a question of rumours--the Registraire des entreprises in Quebec is a business registry for the province that allows you to search for corporate information for numbered companies.

Below is a link to an Evernote item I created on September 1, 2012:

https://www.evernote.com/shard/s229/sh/9...d5cdc90e856ad86

Below is a link to an Evernote item I created today from four separate Evernote notes also created today. That is, I merged the notes into one:

https://www.evernote.com/shard/s229/sh/5...6ccfb3affab1c94

Compare the earlier item from 2012 with the most recent one from today.

Freddy Ruscitti has long been listed in the corporate information for the business entities for the funeral homes owned by Rizzuto family members, going as far back as when the funeral home was still on Beaubien in St. Leonard (St-Léonard). I don't believe Ruscitti is either Sicilian or Calabrian, as the surname is distinctly from the Abruzzo region.

As to what Giordano's funeral-home visitation at the Loreto means, I don't know how to interpret such facts anymore. Frank Cotroni's visitation was there in 2004; the visitation for Giuseppe De Vito's murdered daughters was held there in 2009; and the visitation for De Vito himself was held there.

Posters may recall the kerfuffle when the imprisoned Raynald Desjardins requested and received a letter from Ruscitti shortly after Jos Di Maulo's death that stated the Di Maulo family had never asked for Di Maulo's visitation to be held at the Loreto, nor that the Loreto had refused the Di Maulos' desire for visitation to be held there. Writing in La Presse, David Santerre reported that the Di Maulo family's choice to have the visitation at the Magnus Poirier home was interpreted by some observers (of organized crime) as a reflection of tensions between the Rizzuto crime group and the deceased Di Maulo's associates. See http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-tensions.php.

Those in the Montreal area who are regular folk and happen to be paesani of the Rizzutos do not have a choice when making funeral arrangements in advance or upon the death of a relative--as far as the selection of the funeral home goes, the visitation has to be at the Loreto. End of story. I'm beginning to wonder, when the Rizzuto organization has held sway all these decades, whether there has been some similar underworld protocol for the funeral-home visitation with respect to Italian crime figures in, or associated with, the Montreal Mafia--regardless of tensions.



Thats how I'm thinking as well.
Posted By: faffy444

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/07/16 08:21 PM

giacomo vacari
who is dante of the buffalo family ?
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/08/16 04:48 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
As to what Giordano's funeral-home visitation at the Loreto means, I don't know how to interpret such facts anymore. Frank Cotroni's visitation was there in 2004; the visitation for Giuseppe De Vito's murdered daughters was held there in 2009; and the visitation for De Vito himself was held there.


Lorenzo LoPresti's visitation was held there as well even though he had betrayed the Rizzutos by siding with Montagna.

And I wonder whether De Vito had any say over where his daughter's visitation would be held since he was hiding out in Toronto. Also, I remember that you stated that you found some evidence that De Vito and Vito Rizzuto had reconciliated before De Vito's death.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/08/16 09:43 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: antimafia
As to what Giordano's funeral-home visitation at the Loreto means, I don't know how to interpret such facts anymore. Frank Cotroni's visitation was there in 2004; the visitation for Giuseppe De Vito's murdered daughters was held there in 2009; and the visitation for De Vito himself was held there.


Lorenzo LoPresti's visitation was held there as well even though he had betrayed the Rizzutos by siding with Montagna.

And I wonder whether De Vito had any say over where his daughter's visitation would be held since he was hiding out in Toronto. Also, I remember that you stated that you found some evidence that De Vito and Vito Rizzuto had reconciliated before De Vito's death.


Lo Presti's visitation at the Loreto is yet another headscratcher. I didn't find Emilio Cordileone's visitation there to be puzzling except at first--I just think that a lot of the crime reporters and authors in Quebec have wrongly guessed, as we posters do all the time here and elsewhere, who in the Montreal Mafia was or is supposed to be aligned with whom.

When De Vito was on the lam, he did not seem to stay put in Toronto. I am fairly certain he was surveilled in Montreal during the close to four years he was on the run (from 2006 to 2010). For example, there are reports he made the effort to see his daughters once in a while. He also got his mistress in the Montreal area pregnant during that time period, but then again we don't know how much time she spent in Toronto. I agree with you about his very likely having little input into his daughters' funeral arrangements. Maybe he didn't have any input about his own.

I had speculated that Vito Rizzuto and De Vito (or De Vito's associates) had reconciled their differences after I reliably found out about De Vito's visitation having been held at the Loreto--I found out well afterward. But that isn't much evidence of a reconciliation; so I still have no idea why De Vito's visitation was at the Loreto.

Lo Presti's mother (Rosa Lumia) and Domenico Manno's wife (Carmela Lumia) are sisters--could that be the reason Lo Presti's visitation was held at the Loreto? I have no idea.

Tonino Callocchia was described in newspaper articles both as a possible successor to Rizzuto and as a member of the anti-Vito camp. Leonardo Rizzuto and Charlie Renda were seen at the funeral Mass for Callocchia, but the latter's visitation was not at the Loreto. Why not? Again, I have no idea.
Posted By: Giacomo_Vacari

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/08/16 10:07 PM

Dante Gasbarrini.
Posted By: faffy444

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/08/16 11:29 PM

Originally Posted By: Giacomo_Vacari
Dante Gasbarrini.


he died in 2014. do you now speak of his son perhaps ?
Posted By: Giacomo_Vacari

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 12:19 AM

Faffy44, look at my post on page 6.
Posted By: baldo

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 12:56 AM

I'm currently reading Business or Blood. I don't know if this has been answered before but why do the authors often fail to identify people by name in the book? They will say things like "a middle aged Montreal man flew to Ontario and met with so and so, etc" without naming him.

Another example was when they were talking about a certain middle aged man that was being shown respect around other mafia members, shocking the authorities. Could this have been Leonardo Rizzuto?
Posted By: mightyhealthy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 01:00 AM

They could be concerned about possible Libel. Not sure what the Canadian rules are.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 02:01 AM

Ahit would you take a guess as to how much time rizzuto will get? 10 yrs 15yrs ect. The last guy who got whacked at the gym did half of his 15yr sentence that was for gambling. It seems rizzuto has a lot worse charges then that guy so he's probably looking at 20. Well I bet Vito didn't for see his family destroyed. Like everyone got murder or locked up that's not a mafia dinasty bad look.
Posted By: Giacomo_Vacari

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 02:38 AM

Leonardo will get out in 8 years. He has some good lawyers so maybe 5 years.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 04:24 AM

Originally Posted By: baldo
I'm currently reading Business or Blood. I don't know if this has been answered before but why do the authors often fail to identify people by name in the book? They will say things like "a middle aged Montreal man flew to Ontario and met with so and so, etc" without naming him.

Another example was when they were talking about a certain middle aged man that was being shown respect around other mafia members, shocking the authorities. Could this have been Leonardo Rizzuto?



That last part, I know what you're talking about. I believe they were referring to Leonardo. Not sure if this is 100% accurate, and I might have to look again, but I believe they said something a long the lines of "this person" was being taken to the Rizzuto hangout spots by Rocco Sollecito and was being introduced and being shown great respect by the longtime mafiosi. And I think they said "this person" had a strong familial tie to The Rizzutos and had no prior criminal record. I believe that's what it said, as I remember first reading that passage and thinking they were referring to Leonardo. And that was long before he was confirmed to be a co-boss. I think it was definitely Leonardo.
Posted By: TommyGambino

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 01:14 PM

Originally Posted By: Giacomo_Vacari
It looks pretty much like Arcadi vs Manno for the leadership postion. In other words it is Calabrians vs. Sicilians. The Rizzuto fraction is backed up by the Bonanno family (Salvatore Catalano), the Cotroni is backed up by the Gambino family (Frank Cali, but stopped when he become more scrutinized by LE, unknown who took over as a conduit) Buffalo was neutral before Dante passed away in 14', don't know who took over that crew, but if is Bruno, then they will support sicilians, if it was Giovanni, then they will support the calabrians. Not talking about Pops crew (which is in support of the Cotroni fraction, due to the Violi family) but different crew in Canada, which Buffalo has two crews up there.


lol Bullshit.
Posted By: baldo

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 01:34 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Originally Posted By: baldo
I'm currently reading Business or Blood. I don't know if this has been answered before but why do the authors often fail to identify people by name in the book? They will say things like "a middle aged Montreal man flew to Ontario and met with so and so, etc" without naming him.

Another example was when they were talking about a certain middle aged man that was being shown respect around other mafia members, shocking the authorities. Could this have been Leonardo Rizzuto?



That last part, I know what you're talking about. I believe they were referring to Leonardo. Not sure if this is 100% accurate, and I might have to look again, but I believe they said something a long the lines of "this person" was being taken to the Rizzuto hangout spots by Rocco Sollecito and was being introduced and being shown great respect by the longtime mafiosi. And I think they said "this person" had a strong familial to The Rizzutos and had no prior criminal record. I believe that's what it said, as I remember first reading that passage and thinking they were referring to Leonardo. And that was long before he was confirmed to be a co-boss. I think it was definitely Leonardo.


Yup, that's the exact passage I was talking about. Reading this book, it's almost impossible to keep track of all the murders, who was on what side, etc.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 03:13 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Originally Posted By: baldo
I'm currently reading Business or Blood. I don't know if this has been answered before but why do the authors often fail to identify people by name in the book? They will say things like "a middle aged Montreal man flew to Ontario and met with so and so, etc" without naming him.

Another example was when they were talking about a certain middle aged man that was being shown respect around other mafia members, shocking the authorities. Could this have been Leonardo Rizzuto?



That last part, I know what you're talking about. I believe they were referring to Leonardo. Not sure if this is 100% accurate, and I might have to look again, but I believe they said something a long the lines of "this person" was being taken to the Rizzuto hangout spots by Rocco Sollecito and was being introduced and being shown great respect by the longtime mafiosi. And I think they said "this person" had a strong familial to The Rizzutos and had no prior criminal record. I believe that's what it said, as I remember first reading that passage and thinking they were referring to Leonardo. And that was long before he was confirmed to be a co-boss. I think it was definitely Leonardo.


You may be right, but they also describe this person as a newcomer. Leonardo fits the description on everything but a newcomer.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 03:46 PM

They could've meant a newcomer to the criminal underworld. At least that's the way I interpreted it, I think Leonardo would fit that description as well. He was exposed to his fathers schemes and business ventures as a legal counsel I think, not as an actual participant. So I think that he would fit that as well. Thats just my theory though. And do you know of anyone whom, as they describe, would have a "strong familial tie" to the Rizzutos aside from Leonardo? I don't mean to make it sound so tongue in cheek, this is a legit question.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 05:42 PM

I was thinking Stefano Sollecito, but it's been a while since I read the book and don't remember the clean record part (not saying anyone is lying, I'm saying my memory sucks....lol).

Vito and Leonardo was under investigation before as I think both were on wiretaps. So he had some prior knowledge beforehand, but whether the whole "family" knew he was in on things or not who knows?

As for the Loreto stuff, I quit trying to figure that stuff out. It seemed out of the gate if you were not allowed to have your funeral there it meant you were out of favor but know it seems they will serve anyone, friend or foe.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 07:02 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
And do you know of anyone whom, as they describe, would have a "strong familial tie" to the Rizzutos aside from Leonardo?


I'm not sure whether those words are used to describe this person's relationship with Rizzuto. But I can't think of anyone else and you may very well be right.

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
I was thinking Stefano Sollecito, but it's been a while since I read the book and don't remember the clean record part (not saying anyone is lying, I'm saying my memory sucks....lol)


Stefano was indicted in 2002 and served prison time.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 10:50 PM

I knew that, it was just the fact I didn't remember the clean record being in the sentence in the book. Wasn't it drugs that got him put up?
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/09/16 11:56 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
I knew that, it was just the fact I didn't remember the clean record being in the sentence in the book. Wasn't it drugs that got him put up?


I think it had something to do with a gambling enterprise or bookmaking in Ontario. He was indicted along with Joe Renda I believe.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/10/16 02:50 AM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
And do you know of anyone whom, as they describe, would have a "strong familial tie" to the Rizzutos aside from Leonardo?


I'm not sure whether those words are used to describe this person's relationship with Rizzuto. But I can't think of anyone else and you may very well be right.

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
I was thinking Stefano Sollecito, but it's been a while since I read the book and don't remember the clean record part (not saying anyone is lying, I'm saying my memory sucks....lol)


Stefano was indicted in 2002 and served prison time.



You're right, I'm sorry. Here's the exact words from the passage:


"Police surveillance were startled in early 2014 to see Vito's last consigliere Rocco Sollecito making the rounds with a fresh face in the milieu. This man has a clean criminal record but enjoyed a tight, affectionate tie to Vito. Sollecito seemed bent on introducing him to everyone who was anyone in his world. As he made the rounds with Sollecito, the man carried himself with the utmost seriousness,as one might expect from the new boss of a major crime family."


Definitely sounds like they may have been describing a family member, like a son. And the police being startled part, may be in reference to them finding it very surprising that one like Leonardo were personally involving himself in his fathers criminal affairs.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/10/16 03:27 PM

And I was wrong about the word newcomer, fresh face differs a little bit. Now that I've read it along with the fact that Leonardo has been identified as leader I think they're most likely referring to him. Their description also corresponds with my theory that Leonardo oversees his family's interests while Stefano is in charge of the street operations. It's an interesting solution but I don't think it will last.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/10/16 05:42 PM

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/03/08/funerailles-du-mafieux-lorenzo-giordano-1
Translation Journal de Montreal Félix Séguin
FÉLIX SÉGUIN
Tuesday, March 8, 2016 3:01 p.m.
Update Tuesday, March 8, 2016 3:05 p.m.
One of the last men of honor at the Montreal Mafia may have been killed because he wanted to keep to himself much of the income of Italian organized crime. Sources consulted by our Bureau of Investigation believe that the hypothesis holds up.
Shortly before his release, on December 8, Lorenzo Giordano had been assigned 25% of the revenue of the "Book" of the Mafia.
This famous book is actually a notebook in which the accounting of paris illegal activities of the Mafia is registered. Normally, the person who owns the book harvest millions of dollars per year.
The book been so coveted that many criminals who controlled part were, too, murdered.
The loan shark Roger Valiquette and Tonino Callochia gangster suffered the same fate as Lorenzo Giordano in 2013 and 2014.
Lorenzo calm
"The Italians wanted to buy peace with Lorenzo just before his release from prison," said a police source.
"By giving him part of the book, Stefano Sollecito [interim ex-mafia godfather] thought they could calm him," she continues.
The problem, according to our sources, is that the mafia in power seems to have forgotten that the boiling Lorenzo Giordano and his cronies (Francesco Arcadi and Francesco Del Balso) had 100% of the famous "Book" before being arrested after operation Coliseum in 2006 and not the 25% lean that we wanted to give them.
Upon his release from prison, Giordano who resided in a Sherbrooke Street halfway house would have undertaken to regain control of what he had lost.
"If I try to do you a favor by giving you a quarter of something you already owned, you'll tell me what?" Asks a source.
The following
Several observers of the Montreal underworld world believe that future decisions of Rocco Sollecito, a faithful ally of the former godfather Vito Rizzuto, will be crucial to the survival of the Sicilian clan.
Since the imprisonment of his son Stefano, the veteran would have taken a more active role in the daily operations of the Mafia.
DISCREET HOMAGE, BUT UNDER STRICT SURVEILLANCE
Members of the Montreal Mafia discreetly attended Tuesday's funeral Lorenzo Giordano, celebrated one day week to the day after he was murdered in his car outside a gym in Laval.
According to our sources, no criminal was interest too publicly exhibit at the funeral of one of the men who could lead the Montreal Mafia.
Indeed, the event was scrutinized closely by the police who are trying to determine what new alliances that is about to form organized crime in Montreal.
At least three unmarked vehicles also housed police officers taking pictures of these criminals and note in a notebook the names of those who are not.
The criminals tried to be discreet so that several went into hiding at the funeral Loreto.
Entrance through the garage
Lot, Mario Sollecito (Stefano Sollecito brother) and Nic Spagnolo (alleged member of the mafia table) entered the sly by the interior garage of the funeral complex, owned by the Rizzuto family.
In the past, the police gave much importance to the fact that Italian criminals are exposed or not living Loreto.
"The fact that a murder victim is exposed in Loreto could give us an indication that she had not been awarded by the Rizzuto clan. But things have changed is not so clear now, "said a source familiar with the anti-mafia fight.
" Dad "
At the end of the funeral, the body of 52 year old man was taken to the church of Mary Help of Rivieres-des-Prairies by a procession of ten cars, five limousines bearing flowers showers with the mentions "Zio" and "Papa".
No registration on bouquets seemed to suggest that they could come from prominent Sicilian families.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/10/16 06:28 PM

So the brother of the street boss whose in jail with cancer showed up to the wake. I mean that would mean his brother had nothing to do with the hit or he'd probably be attacked at the wake by the guys kids or brother no?
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/10/16 07:59 PM

I think not. They are brazen enough to attend anyway but it's just an opinion. Will see where all this leads up to.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/10/16 08:15 PM

Originally Posted By: pmac
So the brother of the street boss whose in jail with cancer showed up to the wake. I mean that would mean his brother had nothing to do with the hit or he'd probably be attacked at the wake by the guys kids or brother no?


The wake was held at the Rizzuto owned Loreto funeral home, I believe, so it wouldn't be very surprising that Rizzuto affiliates would actually attend.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/29/16 04:46 AM

There was an attempt on the life of Nino De Bartolomeis.

Link to French-language article:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-a-la-mafia.php
Posted By: Giacomo_Vacari

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/29/16 06:06 AM

You beat me to it antimafia smile
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/29/16 09:22 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
There was an attempt on the life of Nino De Bartolomeis.

Link to French-language article:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-a-la-mafia.php


Here's a link to an English-language article:

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/man-shot-inside-home-in-riviere-des-prairies
Posted By: SonnyBlackstein

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/29/16 10:07 PM

Always appreciate your contributions AM.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/29/16 11:37 PM

One newspaper article mentions Nino de Bartolomeis got shot eight to nine times in the upper body & was rushed to a hospital where he was placed in an induced coma to treat his injuries.
Wonder if he is going to make it alive ?
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 03/30/16 12:39 AM

The English article says he's in stable condition...And he's got a nice nickname. Lol
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/01/16 01:39 PM

Francesco Del Balso is unhappy with the protection afforded by the medium-security penitentiary he has been in. My guess is that he finds it too confining. <----(see what I did there?)

In all seriousness, he wants to be released.

Link to French-language article:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-sa-liberte.php
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/01/16 04:31 PM

Should he get out of jail, it remains to see if he has enough muscle left to stay alive and mount an attack or will he get the same fate as his partner Giordano.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/01/16 09:07 PM

I think he'll end up like Giordano. Wonder if Arcadi ends up the same way?
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/04/16 06:47 PM

"Montreal Mafia: After brief lull, blood is being spilled again"

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...g-spilled-again
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/04/16 09:15 PM

Thanks again anti!
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/04/16 09:17 PM

I think even Montreal and Canada OC reporters are just as much in the dark as we are and are also theorizing. And I don't think their will ever be another full fledged leader of the Montreal Mafia, not a one person head anyway. I think, which I think was also proven in the MAGOT And MASTIF investigation, that the leader(s) will be two guys or more, like a council like the Genovese had. And I think untile we hear otherwise from Law Enforcement Leonardo & Stefano are those guys.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/04/16 09:35 PM

I agree on all of that Sinatra. We still don't know for sure who killed Giordano either. Is Arcadi going after Rizzuto/Sollecito? Is Rizztuo/Sollecito behind the murder attempt on Desjardins? If not, who is after them (since the RCMP claim someone had a hit on out on them)? We might not ever know. This seems to be the hardest family to crack period. No rats or nothing. So we might be guessing 10 years from now.
Posted By: BobbyPazzo

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/04/16 09:52 PM

Stating the obvious, these guys play for real. They make American cosa Nostra look silly. Straight shooters.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/04/16 10:00 PM

It was Montagna who was behind the attempt on Desjardins. Either him or Tony Magi, possibly both working in collusion, which I think is the most likely scenario. As for the recent death threats and plots on Desjardins, according to the multiple law enforcement agencies whom conducted Project MAGOT & MASTIF, Mom Boucher was orchestrating that with the help of his daughter and Gregory Wooley.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/05/16 10:22 PM

That's what I was talking about, the most recent "attempt". I agree it was easily Montagna on the first attempt.

BUT what has me is did Rizzuto/Sollecito go to Mom or did Mom act alone with Wooley? To me it doesn't seem they would go after Desjardins unless they had the ok from Rizzuto/Sollecito or they approached him first through Wooley or his daughter?
Posted By: Terence

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/05/16 11:15 PM

https://reportca.net/2016/04/turmoil-in-the-montreal-mafia-its-explosive/

Latest article from ReportCa on the growing tensions in Canada outlining the alliance between the remaining Ruzzuto clan, Hells Angels, Gregory Woolley's gang with Loris Cavaliere acting as a conduit.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/06/16 01:22 PM

That's the same exact article that Anti posted. Just a different website.
Posted By: Terence

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/06/16 05:32 PM

You're right, my mistake. Sorry for the repeat post.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/08/16 05:45 PM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...lan-rizzuto.php

Another Rizzuto soldier/bodyguard to be released from jail in the fall.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/08/16 07:35 PM

Translation for previous post
DANIEL RENAUD
La Presse April 2, 2016
Pompa Desiderio, considered by police as the one responsible for collecting money from sports bets for the Montreal Mafia, failed Wednesday to convince the commissioners to grant him parole.
Pompa, a 38 year old colossus, was arrested in possession of a weapon then charged that he was in his car in December 2010, a month after the assassination of the old godfather Nicolo Rizzuto.During an ensuing search at his home, investigators found other weapons, ammunition and money. In 2014, he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to three years in prison.
Commissioners parole Wednesday Pompa confirmed that he was wearing a bulletproof vest and he was still armed in the period before his arrest because he feared for his life, he added. He said he agreed to keep a weapon that once belonged to a friend. The name of this friend does not appear in the commissioners' decision, but everything indicates that this is Ennio Bruni, then a faithful of Rizzuto killed he left the coffee Bellerose in Laval in September 2010 at the height of the coup attempt against the Sicilians. Police believe also that Pompa has since replaced Bruni in the new organizational chart of the Montreal Mafia.
MEALS FOR INSIDERS
Pompa Desiderio had a criminal record before this conviction. He denied being part of the Montreal Mafia, contrary to the assertions of intelligence reports.
Against the advice of Pompa release agent, the Commissioners refused to grant him parole. In particular, they raised the fact that during his incarceration, Pompa "had some influence in the penitentiary, it was observed directly under other influential members of the mafia and that he participated in meals where only members organized crime were invited. "
"The fact that you were constantly reinforced during your illegal activities demonstrates a propensity for violence and considerable danger to society. Even if you have not broken your requirements during your freedom on bail, the Commission believes that you have not changed your marginal values and delinquent since your arrest. Your crime is more serious than indicated by your record, "write the commissioners in a decision of five pages made on Wednesday night.
Although it has been a failure, Pompa will not have to wait very long for his freedom. His release is scheduled for the fall.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/08/16 07:57 PM

That guy will be on the hit list. Do yourself a favor move to Florida.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/08/16 08:48 PM

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/04...aine-en-arizona
Translation
ERIC THIBAULT
Friday, April 8, 2016 1:32 p.m.
Update Friday, April 8, 2016 1:32 p.m.
The Montreal mafioso Girolamo Del Balso likely spend the next four years in a penitentiary in Arizona, after being found guilty of possession of 50 kilos of cocaine for the purpose of trafficking.
The man of 45 years - the younger brother of one of the leaders of the clan Rizzuto arrested and convicted following Operation Colisée November 2006, Francesco Del Balso - recorded the plea Wednesday in Superior Court of the County of Mohave , learned the Journal.
Less than two months after his arrest, he accepted a settlement offer that included a sentence of four years in prison, said to us the prosecutor, Mr. Mark Barlow.

Judge Steven Conn postponed the sentencing until next month to allow a probation officer to prepare a report assessing the Quebec detainee and whether the suggested sentence is appropriate. Del Balso is liable to a maximum penalty of five years in prison under his crime.
The charge of transporting or importing cocaine for the purpose of trafficking, which would carry a punishment three times more severe, was abandoned as a result of negotiations between the prosecution and defense.

Careless driving
February 17, Girolamo Del Balso was stopped on Interstate 40 by a state patrol to have stuck too closely another motorist.
Finding his behavior "suspicious", the "State Trooper" then requested assistance from the Kingman Police and its canine unit to search the Canadian vehicle.
The tracking dog police, a German shepherd named Amigo, quickly sensed the 50 kilos of white powder concealed inside a gym bag in the trunk of the car.
The value of the drug, estimated at US $ 3.7 million by the police, was most likely for the Canadian market, according to her.
Mafia destabilized
In police circles, they were astonished Girolamo Del Balso could serve as mere "mail" to carry such quantity of drugs, given the important role that played his older brother Francesco in the upper echelons of organized crime Italian.
The Montreal Mafia is currently destabilized. Its main alleged leaders - lawyer Leonardo Rizzuto, son of Vito Rizzuto, Sollecito and Stefano, the son of Rocco Sollecito, who was a staunch ally of the deceased godfather - have been held for a police raid in November 2015 was also the leader of the Hells Angels Salvatore Cazzetta, and a number of street gangs, Gregory Woolley.
Five days before his brother arrest,Francesco Del Balso was transferred in a halfway house, after more than nine years of incarceration.
But the murder of his friend and partner, the aspiring godfather Lorenzo Giordano, shot in the parking lot of a training center in Laval, March 1, prompted correctional authorities to bring the penitentiary in Drummondville to better ensure protection, fearing that the same fate.
Francesco Del Balso - who was a lieutenant of the former interim head of the Mafia, Francesco Arcadi - will soon be heard by the Superior Court hoping to overturn the suspension of his parole.
He had made about him during the Charbonneau Commission, whereas we had broadcast the recording of a telephone conversation in which Del Balso warned a contractor of Quebec not to return to ceramic works in Montreal. "Because next time, you will leave no around here, OK?", Had said the mafioso before hanging up.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/08/16 09:26 PM

I agree, I would get the hell out of dodge.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/08/16 09:27 PM

He's either got the best lawyer or he gave the Canadian feds some info as to who killed his brother or why. 62 kilos caught red handed doesn't make any sense. Street value like 10 million.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/08/16 09:27 PM

36k a kilo give or take a few grand.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/08/16 10:31 PM

Yeah they mention in the article there were negotiations between the prosecution and defense. Wonder what that was all about.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/08/16 11:23 PM

He may know who was involved in the murder of his brother and started to talk. We'll see if this is the case in the upcoming weeks and months.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/09/16 12:08 AM

Girolamo Del Balso's brother, Francesco, is still alive and has requested parole despite a threat on his life. You guys are probably referring to Lorenzo Giordano, who was close but unrelated to Del Balso.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/09/16 12:19 AM

Sonny is correct, Giordano was killed, not any Del Balso. They snatched Del Balso and Arcadi back up and put them back in the pen instead of keeping them in the halfway house to be clipped as well.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/09/16 01:05 AM

Definitely got him confused with Giordano for a second. But considering the closeness of those three, and the fear of authorities that the lives of Del Balso and Arcadi are in danger, maybe he knows what's actually going on out there and who's really warring with whom. Though I don't see how US agencies would be able to use that information, unless he was talking to Canadian Authorities whom were brought in. Even so, would that have any effect on a sentence given by a US court? I mean I suppose it could.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/09/16 10:38 AM

Your are correct Sonny Black . My statement to pmac was in reference to the light sentence. I did not read the part about the brother.I shoud have been more attentive.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/09/16 11:08 AM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...la-di-marco.php

translation
Published April 8, 2016 at 19:19 | Updated April 8, 2016 at 19:19
Nicola Di Marco, an intermediate of the Montreal Mafia "high level" who was released on parole in 2014, was returned to prison in recent weeks for breaking one of its conditions, learned La Presse.

Di Marco, 46, who could not associate with individuals linked to organized crime, was seen with a person associated with the Mafia, which would have caused his recall. According to unconfirmed reports, this individual would be Nino De Bartolomeis, aka Nino Brown, seriously wounded in an attack two weeks ago. It also appears, according to our sources, the authorities were worried about the safety of Di Marco since the murder of aspiring godfather Lorenzo Giordano committed in Laval, March 1st.

In 2011, Nicola Di Marco was sentenced to more than four years in prison for possession of a 9 mm pistol and keeping a gambling house. When major anti-mafia raid Clemenza led by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Canada in 2014, Di Marco was again arrested for attempting to introduce drugs in prison, on behalf of his former boss, the late leader of clan Giuseppe de Vito, poisoned with cyanide to Donnacona penitentiary in summer 2013. it imposed an additional sentence of 12 months for the crime.

During the 2000s, Di Marco has also been, for some time at least, one of the leaders of an illegal gambling house controlled by the Mafia.

It's also about him that investigators had found in 2008, incriminating documents given by the mole RCMP Angelo Cecere, who acted on behalf of Giuseppe De Vito.

During submissions on sentencing, the former prosecutor of the Federal Prosecution became a judge of the Court of Québec, Yvan Poulin, described Di Marco as an intermediate high-level mafia because he had testified himself, he could sit at the same table with important mafiosi.

Unless a turnaround, Di Marco might have to appear before the Parole Board members. It could also choose to wait until the end of his sentence, in the coming months.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/13/16 11:15 AM

Mathieu Desjardins son of Raynald Desjardins sentenced one year in jail for possession of a fire arm.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 04/13/16 04:18 PM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-desjardins.php
translation
Published April 13, 2016 at 9:04 | Updated at 9:04

DANIEL RENAUD
La Presse
Mathieu Desjardins, 27, whose father Raynald Desjardins is regarded by the police as a major player in Montreal organized crime, was sentenced to a year in prison for possession of a weapon Tuesday at the courthouse in Montreal.

This provincial sentence is a victory for his lawyer, M e Jean Cordeau, which called for a year, while the prosecution wanted a sentence ranging from two and a half years to three years.

In his decision, Judge Jean-Pierre Boyer of the Quebec Court took into account the lack of criminal history of the accused, the fact that he pled guilty and a report was favorable which among his "dynamism, its good organization, maturity and motivation" to keep the efforts for a successful future.

Mathieu Desjardins was arrested by patrol SPVM as he left a jewelry store downtown Montreal, June 6, 2012. The police were called by an employee who had seen a handgun in the bag back of the suspect, now commercially as a single client. In searching her bag, patrol have found a 9mm pistol loaded with eight bullets and whose serial number had been obliterated.

FEARS FOR HIS LIFE

Mathieu Desjardins pleaded guilty to a weapons possession charge in May 2015. During sentencing submissions to impose, he explained that he had bought the gun a few days after the attempted murder against his father, in Laval, September 16, 2011, because he feared for his life. He also told that these are the contacts he has made while working in the bars which enabled him to obtain this weapon on the black market. Finally, Mathieu Desjardins also admitted to making marginal meetings in the past, but said he was not attracted to this lifestyle.


Today, the young man is co-owner of a fitness center. Mathieu Desjardins will likely serve at least half of his sentence before getting parole.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/05/16 03:33 PM

"Attaque au café Liana: un message à un acteur important de la mafia"

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...de-la-mafia.php
Posted By: Mick2010

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/05/16 07:16 PM

Any chance you can give a quick run down of the article? My translation was junk
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/05/16 10:18 PM

Here is the translation:
After a few relatively quiet weeks,the arson that occurred Saturday at Café Liana in Montreal suburb Rivière-des-Prairies could mean the beginning of a renewed tensions within the Montreal Mafia.

Enlarge
Marco Pizzi is suspected of being a cocaine importer and is currently charged in connection by the Clemenza investigation led by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in 2010 and 2011.
PHOTO HUGO SEBASTIAN AUBERT, THE ARCHIVE PRESS
According to our information and sources, the Liana café, located at 7310, boulevard Maurice-Duplessis, whose window was damaged by a Molotov cocktail to 5 h 30 Saturday morning, was controlled - at least until recently - by Marco Pizzi, suspected of being a cocaine importer and currently accused in connection with the Clemenza investigation by the RCMP in 2010 and 2011. Pizzi was arrested last May as part of this investigation and released a few weeks later, pending further proceedings.
On 1 st August, the 46 year old man Marco Pizzi was victim of a murder attempt when two individuals rammed his vehicle with their van on Avenue de la Grande-Allée, in Montreal East.
When Marco Pizzi got out of his car, he noticed that the occupants of the other vehicle were holding weapons and immediately fled and managed to avoid an attempt on his life.The suspects, one might ask if their intention was to kidnap Pizzi, ran to their getaway car before evaporating in nature. One of the suspects has associations to street gangs, but was arrested a few days later by the SPVM.

Café is KNOWN to police.
During major police investigations in recent years, scores of individuals linked to the mafia or organized crime , have led them to Liana cafe.
It has been reportedly that the property was controlled by Tonino Callocchia, suspected of being a lender and cocaine importer and an associate of Pizzi, murdered in a bar of the Rivière-des-Prairies, the XO Bistro, November 30, 2014.
The police does not exclude that Callocchia was the victim of a set up. Reportedly, he and Pizzi were to take part in a meeting which was apparently first convened at Liana bar and continue at bistro XO.
By coincidence, Pizzi was not a victim of events, but sources do not rule out that he could also have been targeted by the attackers.
The Liana coffee was formerly calle Boca coffee. In December 2010, investigators from the Organized Crime Division of the Montreal police had raided the Boca coffee as part of a project called Alkali for the purpose to end a wave of arson attacks against Italian cafes of Montreal, conducted at the height of the coup attempt carried out against Rizzuto, weakened by Project Colisée.
Last spring, following an agreement with the owners, the commission of Alcohol and Gaming, suspended the license of Boca cafe for 23 days after finding various breaches of the law. In particular, the board had not been notified of the name change from Boca Café to Liana Cafe.
In June 2014, an inspector from the agency was among others that found that the cafe service desk was not functional, the fridge was locked and not functional and there was no cash register.
To join Daniel Renaud confidentially, call 514 285-7000, extension 4918, or write to the postal address of La Presse.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 12:10 AM


It looks like they are at it again.

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/09/14/mysterieux-message-a-la-mafia
Posted By: ralphie_cifaretto

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 12:29 AM

The hatred they have for the ol' Rizzuto faction is like a bottomless pit.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 12:36 AM

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/09/14/mysterieux-message-a-la-mafia

Here is the translation: Sept. 14, 2016
Mysterious message to the Mafia
Three cafe’s linked to Vito Rizzuto clan (deceased godfather), were attacked by arsonists in less than a week. A mysterious message left in a bottle near one of the café’s, suggests that attempts to destroy what remains of the Sicilian clan.
Without fanfare, in the shadow of the return of the Hells Angels in Quebec, the Montreal Mafia seems beset by tensions.
For a third time, two mafia-related institutions were targeted, but this time around, they seem to have ensured to leave a message at the café.
On the night of September 9, Café Empire of the Jean-Talon St. E. had his window smashed by an incendiary object.
Empire and Dilallo
This cafe was the place of meeting of the Interim godfather of the Montreal Mafia, Stefano Sollecito, jailed since last November after Magot Mastiff and operations, according to police sources.
The same night, vandals have also visited Dilallo restaurant located a few meters from the Empire coffee.
The restaurant serves burgers is administered by Vito Salvaggio and as a third shareholder, a numbered company located in the home of Leonardo Rizzuto, but registered in the name of the mother of the man who was also arrested in anti-mafia raid last November.
"The suspects fled on foot to the arrival of police, we are always looking for them," confirmed the SPVM
It is in a side street not far from there that the police found a message for the Sicilian clan whose tottering leadership is questioned. The SPVM refused to confirm that such a message has been recovered from the scene.
Beautiful rose
Last Monday, in the morning, a Molotov cocktail was thrown against the Bellerose coffee shop window located in the Vimont district of Laval.
The incendiary device has only very little damage to the facility, but that's what happened there six years in the same place, which raises questions.
Empire and Dilallo
This cafe was the place of meeting of the Interim godfather of the Montreal Mafia, Stefano Sollecito, jailed since last November after Magot Mastiff operations, according to police sources.
The same night, vandals have also visited Dilallo restaurant located a few meters from the Empire coffee.
The restaurant serves burgers is administered by Vito Salvaggio and he is listed as a third shareholder, a numbered company located in the home of Leonardo Rizzuto, but registered in the name of the mother of the man who was also arrested in anti-mafia raid last November.
"The suspects fled on foot to the arrival of police, we are always looking for them," confirmed the SPVM
It is in a side street not far from there that the police found a message for the Sicilian clan whose tottering leadership is questioned. The SPVM refused to confirm that such a message has been recovered from the scene.
Café Bellerose
Last Monday, in the morning, a Molotov cocktail was thrown against the Bellerose coffee shop window located in the Vimont district of Laval.
The incendiary device has only very little damage to the facility, but that's what happened there six years in the same place, which raises questions.
In September 2010, the henchman of the Rizzuto family, Enio Bruni fell to the bullets of assassins while the godfather was still imprisoned in the United States
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 12:38 AM

I know when is all of this going to end.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 12:39 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment


Daniel Renaud theorizes that the recent attacks on establishments have been caused by a fight for control of the sports-betting racket.

Mafia montréalaise: bras de fer pour le «livre» des paris sportifs

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...is-sportifs.php
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 01:19 PM

Here is another article from Journal de Montreal. Interesting article. Some are refusing the godfather job.

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/09/15/vague-dincendies-criminels-contre-le-clan-rizzuto
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 01:29 PM

They are speculating Rizzuto clan retaliation for this Resto Liege.

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-a-montreal.php
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 06:29 PM

Logical decision of Mucci not wanting to step in as leader of the old Rizzuto group. History has shown that he'll be marked and he knows that better than anyone. Not for nothing he's one of the last of the Mohicans. However, it seems that even the Rizzuto family have lost faith in Stefano Sollecito and that he's becoming increasingly isolated. Or perhaps he's now too ill to lead. In any case, it must suck to be him right now.

The intriguing question remains of who is behind these attacks. I'm suprised that so far not even a hint is given.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 09:35 PM

Importante frappe contre la mafia à Laval | JDM http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/09/15/importante-frappe-contre-la-mafia-a-laval
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 09:56 PM

This has been one busy week !
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 11:03 PM

Le criminaliste Loris Cavaliere accusé de possession d'arme http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ssion-darme.php
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 11:15 PM

I guess he was afraid to get whacked Like the previous mob lawyers Frank Schoofey & Sidney Leithman.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/15/16 11:16 PM

When people were saying vitos family was like the 6th family or equal get fuck out of here. That family has gotten taken out 1by1. Now people are just bullying them firebombing there cafes and saying gives us what you got left. Just to much man power and history in the states for that type of shit.
Posted By: BobbyPazzo

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/16/16 01:32 AM

Originally Posted By: pmac
When people were saying vitos family was like the 6th family or equal get fuck out of here. That family has gotten taken out 1by1. Now people are just bullying them firebombing there cafes and saying gives us what you got left. Just to much man power and history in the states for that type of shit.

@pmac ... I don't much about Canada but from what I do know and hear about them they are on another level. These guys seen to still have the old world mentality. Yes they are getting killed left and right bu that's exactly the point... They're killing people like it's nothing. They don't give a fuck up there. That kinda shit would never happen in the states nowadays. I keep reading about all these murders and how they're carried out and I'm like what the fuck. I don't know how much money they make and the types of rackets they run but they are Definetly gangster as fuck. I don't know they amount of guys they have or the structure but you have to give them credit for being about that action. I feel like I'm reading a mob fiction novel.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/16/16 11:19 AM

Agostino [BadWord] enterprise hit with Molotov cocktail.

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ail-molotov.php

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/09...saint-leonard-1
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/16/16 12:59 PM

English article.

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...ng-mafia-member
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/16/16 01:52 PM

pmac, I would have to disagree. When Vito was out of jail they were a well known power. The only time bodies start to drop is when the leaders were/are in jail or prison. They didn't even hit Rocco Sollecito until Stefano and Leonardo Rizzuto were behind bars. Same for these attacks.

I think Stefano lost a ton of power once his father died. Leonardo might be in trouble now unless he gets out with a good bit of power as well. We'll see soon enough.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/16/16 03:18 PM

Originally Posted By: pmac
When people were saying vitos family was like the 6th family or equal get fuck out of here. That family has gotten taken out 1by1. Now people are just bullying them firebombing there cafes and saying gives us what you got left. Just to much man power and history in the states for that type of shit.


Wrong. As Dixie said , these attempts happen when the leaders are in prison and the Sicilian clan is always in a state of weakness when the leaders are imprisoned. Its like they get knocked down by law enforcement and whomever their enemies are, they simply smell blood and attack when the clan is already in a weakened state. Of course this is typical of the mafia , however that doesn't take away from the power they seem to wield when their leaders are on the street .

I've stopped keeping track of all of this , tbh, after the Rocco Sollecito murder and the mandatory imprisonments of Frank Del Balso & Frank Arcadi. As I've taken an interest in NY matters between the 80's and early 00's. But things seem to be getting interesting again. Gonna be intriguing as to what comes next.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/16/16 04:06 PM

Agree to disagree. I just think theres more man power in the nyc families were no one would get firebombed on the regular like these last few years. Theyjust have to many guys. Even the small family like colombos they have 60made guys and probaly 100 sons n nephews who would be on the hunt for the guy doing this shit. The huge diffence in nyc not 1 boss have the balls to order hits on dumb shit and face the death penalty. Big paul chin or gotti were all before the federal death pen. Change in 1994. If any of there places got fire bombed and messges they probally have a boss meeting and send out crew from every family to kill the dudes.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/16/16 06:33 PM

Problem with Montreal is that there are a dozen or so factions consisting of a dozen or so guys and no unity.
Posted By: BillyBrizzi

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/16/16 08:47 PM

Looking at the Canadian mob the last couple of years, my esteem for Vito Rizzuto, as a mob leader, got even bigger in retrospect.

All the factions in the underworld must've really feared and respected him, because during his tenure his word was law and he could keep all the factions in line. In my eyes he was the most effective and intelligent North American mob boss of the new millennium.
Posted By: ralphie_cifaretto

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/16/16 08:53 PM

Originally Posted By: BillyBrizzi
Looking at the Canadian mob the last couple of years, my esteem for Vito Rizzuto, as a mob leader, got even bigger in retrospect.

All the factions in the underworld must've really feared and respected him, because during his tenure his word was law en he could keep all the factions in line. In my eyes he was the most effective and intelligent North American mob boss of the new millennium.


He was a very sharp guy. Well read and sophisticated. However, he was operating in a world filled with jealous neanderthals who wanted his spot. I think he knew it wasn't going to work out in the long run.
Posted By: BillyBrizzi

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/16/16 09:00 PM

Originally Posted By: ralphie_cifaretto
Originally Posted By: BillyBrizzi
Looking at the Canadian mob the last couple of years, my esteem for Vito Rizzuto, as a mob leader, got even bigger in retrospect.

All the factions in the underworld must've really feared and respected him, because during his tenure his word was law and he could keep all the factions in line. In my eyes he was the most effective and intelligent North American mob boss of the new millennium.


He was a very sharp guy. Well read and sophisticated. However, he was operating in a world filled with jealous neanderthals who wanted his spot. I think he knew it wasn't going to work out in the long run.


I think you could be right Ralphie, in a way his death was very anti-climatic because he was in the middle of his revenge expedition and it would've been very interesting to see what his reaction would've been to some of the events from the last couple of years.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 12:29 AM

Originally Posted By: pmac
Agree to disagree. I just think theres more man power in the nyc families were no one would get firebombed on the regular like these last few years. Theyjust have to many guys. Even the small family like colombos they have 60made guys and probaly 100 sons n nephews who would be on the hunt for the guy doing this shit. The huge diffence in nyc not 1 boss have the balls to order hits on dumb shit and face the death penalty. Big paul chin or gotti were all before the federal death pen. Change in 1994. If any of there places got fire bombed and messges they probally have a boss meeting and send out crew from every family to kill the dudes.



Your problem is you keep comparing Montreal to NY , when you can't. It's apples to oranges , they're completely different animals , with their own settings , alliances , criminal groups , etc. Its not a fair comparison . One place ever got firebombed in NYC , it'd be called terrorism, the feds would be on their asses in no time. Some place gets firebombed in Montreal or Canada and the RCMP don't know where to start. Mob leaders arent killed in NYC , at all , because the current landscape, environment and culture wouldnt allow it, it has nothing to do with manpower or NYC families being stronger or more vicious than those in Canada or vice versa. Simply put, the feds will shut shit down quick. Stop with this whole NYC is smarter and more dangerous theory, because it isn't true. Maybe in the 70's and 80's these things would happen, not now. Whereas those mafia affiliated in Montreal are going about like its the First Mafia War in Sicily. This also has nothing to do with either side being more smarter or more dangerous than the other , its simply the lack of a RICO in Canada , and the laws on Organized Crime being a lot more lax over there than it is in the States.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 01:16 AM

Your 100percent right s club i was kinda just being a dick. I just think some board members over hype the montreal fAmily or whatever the fuck they are. Your right about the terrorism call deffirent worlds.nyc to montreal. What evers going on up there it isnt organized crime its more like who said 12 groups of 12 all fighting for a piece.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 01:17 AM

Maybe toronto a whole nother ball game.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 01:18 AM

I will say the vito revenge tour was pretty badass well he was alive. But i think the whole organized mafia died with him.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 01:46 AM

Originally Posted By: pmac
Maybe toronto a whole nother ball game.


Toronto guys keep a low profile so they are not a high priority, but Montreal police make arrests all the time. They are even bugging law offices.
Posted By: JC

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 02:15 AM

He was a real success as a human being and a mob boss. His father, his brother-in-law and his son all got killed on his watch. Couldn't have happened to a nicer guy, I am sure that the Violis are laughing their asses off in Ontario.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 05:57 AM

Right JC but those who hit all 3 never would have done it had Massino NOT flipped. That's the only reason Vito took the plea and agreed to serve time in the U.S. If he could have served his time in Canada I don't think none of this gets kick started either. But as soon as he crossed the border the ones wanting to overthrow started their moves. Like Joe Bravo said about Vito being gone and said something to the like "once the boss is gone, the guys will play". Many overlooked Vito too like Joe Bravo who thought he had been with him long enough he thought he was ok but still spurned Vito's calls to Cuba and the DR and of course Vito sent word to Italy and before you knew it Joe Bravo is dead. Same for Moreno Gallo in Mexico.

I wouldn't expect any big hits for now after Sollecito was hit. Leonardo and Stefano are locked up, Desjardins is locked up, so it's a guess at this point as to who has been firebombing places up there. It's definitely going to get interesting if Rizzuto/Sollecito get off this case squeaky clean though.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 06:38 AM

@ Sinatra
+1 to that, been missing your post my man.........

@pmac & scorcese


Only thing I disagree with is that they come to NY for coke connects. I think they come to NY to organize shipments FROM THEIR CONNECT, to their distributors in Europe. I think y'all misunderstanding NYs place in the chain here.

Its the MID-POINT, for the Calabrians. Not the starting point (where they purchase) or the end point (where they get money, distributing). Take the Dominicans right? NY is the END-POINT for them. That's where they GET money distributing. It's 23-25 thou in NY for a key. What makes this work is that it's 10000 a key in the Dominican Republic. Same price in Mexico, or Costa Rica, basically the closer you can get to South America. So THATS where you need your people for a high level connect.

NY is going to be the starting ( purchasing point) for like high level retailers- mid level wholesalers.


That's one of the main reasons these bust were kinda weird. The Siderno group consortium gets coke in Colombia', ships it around the Pacific coast, THROUGH THE PANAMA CANAL, over the Atlantic to Europe. So not only did their coke never go to NY, it never even went OVER LAND. It went directly from Colombia TO the ports in Gioia Tauro and I guess the Port in Montreal? ( I can't remember if they ship it to Europe first, then send it to Montreal, or if it's the other way around...edit: I realized I kept saying Montreal when I meant Toronto, sorry bout that...) This fact that they could bypass the Mexican border, over land is a big reason why they have become what they are today.
(It's also why the Dominicans have what they have in NY, they have the Water equivalent of what the Mexicans have with their land border. But land will always be cheaper to send product over than having to charter a ship or plane, so until they start building walls, increasing the difficulty at the border, and pushing more of the volume through the Caribbean again, the Mexicans kinda will always have the upper hand there as far as being able to move larger BULK shipments. But the Dominicans, because they have " distribution centers", their own neighborhoods they can sell on corners, they have no real reason to go to outsiders really, they are regional, but vertically and horizontally integrated, so they can maximize profits, with these profits, eventually, some Dominican drug lord will organize his own boats or planes and then volume wise they will compete with the Mexicans and Italians...)




My rule of thumb used to be, coke from Colombia over land, To the US = Mexico. ( interestingly, except for the North East...) Coke from Colombia over water, To Europe = Calabrian. But Coke from Colombia, over water to the Dominican Republic, and from there over water, ( be it plane or boat..) to NY and the North East, = Dominican wholesalers/Colombian suppliers. Now, the Dominicans aren't global, they are regional. (This is why I put the Italians and Mexicans a SLIGHT rung above em, the more coke passes through the Caribbean, the narrower the gap is..)

The other weird part of the bust was the MEXICAN CARTEL NOT BASED ON THE BORDER, BUT IN COSTA RICA, CLOSER TO THE COKE. I can't get an understanding as to WHAT CARTEL this is exactly. Sinaloa or the Zetas. I keep reading the Zetas are basically finished, so it must be Sinaloa I guess? They are the only cartel left with global capabilities I think. I always used to connect the cartels to what part of the border they controlled. (Juarez, the Gulf, Tiajuana, Sinaloa produces the most drugs, also has produced the most bosses amongst ALL the cartels) But this cartels strength seems to be based on the fact that they can get cheap coke, AND get the coke to Europe because they had their own shipment service in place. So you have a Mexican cartel, NOT based on moving product across the border.

See I think the Caribbean route is actually faster, better, going back to the rum running days of Luciano and Lansky. It's why they wanted Cuba as the transshipment/ command center for Narcotics. It's more direct, I guess. Whereas the land route is more secure? ( Coke can't sink over land)


So this is rival families, setting up their own TRANSHIPMENT POINTS, all their connects seem to be based in South America, or at least Central America.

What do you guys think, any more thoughts?
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 07:15 AM

Also @ pmac



Gang warfare is nothing like real warfare. Adding up the number of men doesn't tell the whole tale. Think back in Sammys book, the Gambinos had, whatever, twenty one -twenty-six crews right? Yet Sammy said when it came down to it, FIVE really mattered. Gottis crew, DeCiccos crew, Aurello crew, Gaggi- DeMeo, actually it might be four. If you woulda took a sheet of paper, drew a line down the middle, wrote Paul on one side, John on the other, and listed everything Paul had vs everything John had, on paper I'd bet you Paul wipes the fuckin floor with Gotti.


Like the Corleonesi. They had a death squad of maybe 14 guys. They never showed their faces until it was time to do a hit, then back to the shadows, you gotta understand the OLD WORLD WAYS.On paper, no way they win that war vs Bontade and Inzerillo. Or even think back to the castallamarese war. On paper, Maranzano SHOULDNT HAVE been able to beat Masseria. But Maranzano was a better guerrilla fighter/soldier.
Also having unidentifiable hitters is a big plus. I mean come on man, WE KNOW WHO THE MADE GUYS ARE. The Calabrians could find out more even easier, and their hitters would most likely be unknown to American wise-guys.


Now, having said all that, like Sinatra said it would never happen I the states. I don't even think you can take a City like NY, militarily. You know how you do it? With finances and resources. He who makes the most money, can buy the most guns, buy the most allies, gain the most power. So I think what they are talking about is a financial coup, more so than a military one...
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 11:45 AM

Originally Posted By: JC
He was a real success as a human being and a mob boss. His father, his brother-in-law and his son all got killed on his watch. Couldn't have happened to a nicer guy, I am sure that the Violis are laughing their asses off in Ontario.


The Violis undoubtedly had to have some gladness about what happened , but the family itself had jack shit to do with those murders in all likelihood , had Vito never been imprisoned and extradited. Odds are if Vito had to serve his sentence in a Canadian prison, like he initially was and wanted to, all three of those men would still be alive . Except maybe Nicolo Sr , but he'd of died of natural causes as an old man .


@ CabriniGreen , I've been lurking lol. And youre totally right about the crew thing, I hadnt even thought of that. I think Sammy even flat out said so in Underboss a couple of times , Paul had more guys than Gotti & Dellacroce , but the majority of Pauls guys and the crews loyal to him consisted of non-hitters and semi-retiree's . The only guys whom were a worry was the DeMeo crew. Good post.
Posted By: RollinBones

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 02:20 PM

cabrini green, just curious where you got that 23-25k/kilo number for NY?
Posted By: Alfa Romeo

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 03:41 PM

Thanks for the education Cabrini. I have not studied up much on Canadian Cosa Nostra. It's hella interesting from the layman book reader point of view. International drug trafficking Euro-criminals with tons of money, exotic names, and narcissistic personality disorder galore. I have a question for you.

It is said that Aruba became the first [Cosa Nostra] Mafia state to exist when the Cun-trera and Caruana mafia families took over like 60% of the real estate there. Alfonso [Caruana], my namesake, became almost like the mafia king of Aruba, or at least part of it. What is your take on Aruba's role today, if you have any? I think money laundering took place there, and it just had to be a transit point for narcotics. What do you think is going on today? If you don't have an opinion on Aruba, that's ok too.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 08:32 PM

I think they've been, at least partly, been kicked out of Aruba. However, the Mafia still has a presence on these island that are part of the Dutch kingdom, notably curacao.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 11:39 PM

@rollingbones

Documentaries mostly, also a lot of reading. I've seen the 10000 a Ki number for Dominican Republic, Mexico and Costa Rica now. It's like 6000 or so in Venezuela and Brazil, maybe 2000 in Colombia and Peru.

That 23-25000 number I was low balling kinda. Scorsese mentioned that guys could just get coke in NY, so I figured it must be pretty cheap. I've also seen traffickers, in Chicago, the higher level guys can get it for close to 25, but this could be from a few years ago, in the other thread, about GDs, they got the guy on a wiretap saying he USEDto get it for 22, now it's 35. Again, that makes sense because there has been consolidation as far as who controls the borders, it's mostly only Sinaloa now so they can charge more if they want...


What do you think bones, is it more close to 30? 35? That would make sense, in the Decavalcante thread, they say they retail near 80 thou of a half Ki. I saw a doc on Dominican wholesalers saying they get it 10000 in The Dominican Republic, and sell for 23 in NY. I thought that was a little low, like not a big enough margin. But that could be the "Homie price" lol.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/17/16 11:57 PM

I disagree with your the premise, "had Vito never been imprisoned".
Same thing could be said with Paolo Violi who was also imprisoned when the Rizzuto clan made their moves. Frank Cotroni was also imprisoned.
The difference between now and then is that the Vic Cotroni was probably given orders by New York to stand down or he decided he had enough and decided to retire. The difference now is that they do not answer to New York and several capo's from the Cotroni clan decided to strike Rizzuto while he was vulnerable in jail. Furthermore in 2001 Paolo Gervasi wanted to revenge his son's death, he sent two contract killers ready to kill Vito and two of his associates and the attempt was foiled because of police intervention. Again someone could say things would have been different had they succeeded. I believe that fate sometimes plays a good part in determining events.
I also do not dismiss that fact that Ontario may have played a role to destabilize and eventually take control of the Montreal drug trade.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/18/16 12:06 AM

Alfa, hey whats up my man!!!!

I think Sonny pretty much summed up Aruba, but that clan is still, I think one of the top three or so clans in ITALIAN ORGANIZED CRIME in general. Anywhere. They really are like the Mafias Rothschilds..
Posted By: Alfa Romeo

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/18/16 01:03 AM

Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
Alfa, hey whats up my man!!!!

I think Sonny pretty much summed up Aruba, but that clan is still, I think one of the top three or so clans in ITALIAN ORGANIZED CRIME in general. Anywhere. They really are like the Mafias Rothschilds..


Hey Cabrini, doing great. I appreciate you for responding even though I knew you would.

From what you and Sonny had said, it's sounding like an off shore tax haven money laundering situation somewhere out in those islands. Curacao is right next to Aruba. Thank you Sonny and Cabrini for making an attempt at answering my question.

What is surprising [to me] about the Caruana and Cun Trera mafia families is the level of sophistication.

Apparently the underworld trusted them a great deal because they had an airtight ship...blood ties. Alfonso married his niece...it doesn't get any tighter than that.

Then you read about how they dealt directly with the Corsican underworld as Cosa Nostra's middlemen. To me, Corsican underworld means L'Unione Corsa, something almost everyone knows practically nothing about. Fascinating.

The Corsicans are mysterious. Like Sicily they are an island off the mainland of France. Like many Sicilians, they don't seem to quite identify with the mainland. Linguistically, they appear to be partly French and partly Italian, at least as far as their given names go. And last but not least, they have a blackamoor head on their flag. The blackamoor head symbol is also supposedly a sign that one is a member of the Corsican Brotherhood or L'Unione Corsa. It might be worn as a watch fob or pendant.

With these groups, the Cun-treras, Caruanas, and Corsicans, I just can't see them gathering in social clubs or having weekly shape ups at a mob headquarters. Not street gangs.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/18/16 05:33 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
I disagree with your the premise, "had Vito never been imprisoned".
Same thing could be said with Paolo Violi who was also imprisoned when the Rizzuto clan made their moves. Frank Cotroni was also imprisoned.


Not really because Nicolo was already making moves before Violi was locked up. That was why he wanted to kill Nicolo but never go the ok to do so.

In Vito's case you didn't hear shit until he was locked up in Supermax.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/18/16 07:42 PM

For your information Nicolo Rizzuto started to make his moves only after he learned from the CECO commission tape recordings that Paolo Violi and Pietro Sciarra were discussing Nicolo's fate. This was in 1975 and Paolo Violi was imprisoned the same year. Prior to 1975 Nicolo was doing his own thing and wanted nothing to do with Paolo V. This is what sparked meetings with the Bonanno's.
In Vito's case, I do not understand what point your trying to make. I agree that he kept a tight ship and he was good at keeping the peace among all the different clans in Montreal but it wasn't with out incidence. I explained in the same message that he and Paolo Gervasi were feuding and that was well before Vito got arrested.
Posted By: GangstersInc

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/19/16 11:54 AM

Arsonists set Montreal ablaze as deadly Mafia war continues
http://gangstersinc.ning.com/profiles/bl...a-war-continues
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/21/16 08:06 PM

Breaking news:

Projet Machine: le Hells Angels Salvatore Cazzetta libéré de toute accusation

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-accusation.php
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/21/16 11:17 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Breaking news:

Projet Machine: le Hells Angels Salvatore Cazzetta libéré de toute accusation

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-accusation.php


I can hardly make anything out the translation. Has he been released? If so, why?
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/22/16 03:40 AM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: antimafia
Breaking news:

Projet Machine: le Hells Angels Salvatore Cazzetta libéré de toute accusation

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-accusation.php


I can hardly make anything out the translation. Has he been released? If so, why?


Renaud has updated his article, but the one to which I've linked below should answer your questions.

Alleged Hells Angels boss obtains stay of proceedings in contraband tobacco case

http://ctv.news/uXgtiJa
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/22/16 01:08 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: antimafia
Breaking news:

Projet Machine: le Hells Angels Salvatore Cazzetta libéré de toute accusation

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-accusation.php


I can hardly make anything out the translation. Has he been released? If so, why?


Renaud has updated his article, but the one to which I've linked below should answer your questions.

Alleged Hells Angels boss obtains stay of proceedings in contraband tobacco case

http://ctv.news/uXgtiJa


Thanks!
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/22/16 08:21 PM

Sonny Black, I've quit trying to read the translated articles myself. It's gotten to where you can't understand shit in them anymore unless you have a French background. It's frustrating as shit sometimes.
Posted By: ralphie_cifaretto

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/22/16 08:58 PM

The war in Montreal has forced me to attend French classes at USC every Monday, Tuesday and Friday.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/22/16 09:08 PM


Here is the Montreal Gazzette (english) version.

Sept 21,2016 CHRISTOPHER CURTIS, MONTREAL GAZETTE

The Hells Angels scored another judicial victory Wednesday as a Superior Court judge tossed out a slew of charges against high-ranking club member Salvatore Cazzetta.
Cazzetta was facing five counts of gangsterism and conspiracy to commit fraud among other alleged crimes stemming from a 2009 arrest. However, Judge James Brunton had to dismiss the charges because of a series of delays in Cazzetta’s trial.
The delays violated timeframes outlined by the Supreme Court of Canada’s Jordan decision — which states that Superior Court trials must be completed within 30 months of the suspect’s arraignment.
Defence lawyers argued Cazzetta’s trial would likely end only in the summer of 2017 — some 96 months after he was charged alongside other suspects in the Machine raids. The operation saw some 600 police from the RCMP, Sûreté du Québec and Kahnawake Peacekeepers break up an alleged contraband tobacco ring.
Brunton issued his decision in a Longueuil courthouse after deliberating for two days.
“We are absolutely satisfied with this decision,” said Anne-Marie Lanctot, Cazzetta’s lawyer. “We were way past the timeframe … Really, the only delays we were responsible for add up to about 11 months. The Crown made a strategic decision to try to introduce evidence that was inadmissible, which caused delay after delay after delay.”
The case against Cazzetta’s co-accused — Peter Rice and his sons Peter Francis and Burton — was also thrown out Wednesday.
This is the second time charges against Cazzetta have been dropped because of unreasonable court delays. In 2011, Brunton dismissed Cazzetta’s case and that of 30 others rounded up in the 2009 SharQC raids.
Though Cazzetta will not serve time for the gangsterism charges, he’s still awaiting trial for his arrest related to the Sûreté du Québec’s Magot-Mastiff’s organized crime probe.
Representatives from the Quebec Crown prosecutor’s office did not respond to the Montreal Gazette’s interview requests.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/22/16 09:49 PM

Originally Posted By: ralphie_cifaretto
The war in Montreal has forced me to attend French classes at USC every Monday, Tuesday and Friday.


Bonne chance avec ça! I had french and german at school, but it's very rusty.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/23/16 12:12 AM

So they dropped the charges on a old case but all this stuff with vito rizzutos kid will probaly hold him for another 5 yrs.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/23/16 12:39 AM

Originally Posted By: pmac
So they dropped the charges on a old case but all this stuff with vito rizzutos kid will probaly hold him for another 5 yrs.


Yes, but it's still a huge victory for the club. Authorities all over the world are not very succesfull against the Hells Angels in recent years.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/23/16 03:51 PM

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/e...rticle32012926/

Gang experts are concerned about the resurgence of biker gangs
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/23/16 07:57 PM

Prohibited goods delivered to Montreal prisons by drones.

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...es-et-lames.php

English translation:

PRISON in RIVER-DES-PRAIRIES Montreal
Édition du 23 septembre 2016,
TWO DRONES WERE OBSERVED, DRUGS AND WEAPONS FOUND
Last Thursday it was the day of drones at the detention center of Rivière-des-Prairies in Montreal. While two of these flying machines have been observed over the prison yards , the guards discovered in a prison sector housing gang members, a relatively large amount of drugs and tools that were likely delivered by drone tools, as reported by La Presse .
DANIEL RENAUD OF LA PRESSE
RISE IN SIGHTINGS
Drones reported to prison security Québec 2013-2014: 42014-2015: 182015-2016: 272016-2017: 11 (to July 16)

According to stats. obtained from the Ministry of Public Security through the Act on access to public information, the drone sightings over the land of Quebec prisons have vastly risen since 2014. Last year sightings was at 27. This year, as of July 11, there was 16, a figure which is already higher than the same period last year. This year's statistics do not include two last Thursday observations over the Rivière-des-Prairies Detention Centre.
MOST DELIVERED
DANIEL RENAUDLA PRESSE
The most frequent seized goods that are delivered by drones are narcotics, tobacco and rolling paper, the trafficking of these prohibited products within the prison institutional walls are high valued and in demand. Cellular devices, which may allow a prisoner to continue his criminal activities from his cell, are also regularly seized.
DRUGS, CELLULAR AND SAW BLADES ...
DANIEL RENAUDLA PRESSE
After receiving information, correctional officers conducted a search in the evening in the 16 cells of the prison sector which mostly houses “Blue” street gang members. According to sources, they found more than 50 grams of hashish, a substance resembling heroin, six cell phones, saw blades and a small multifunctional appliance. Hours earlier, two drones were sighted over two yards of the prison institution, which is another area where the prisoners are classified as a "general section” of the prison. It is not known if objects were seized as a result of the observation of these drones.
GRILLAGES CLAIMED
DANIEL RENAUDLA PRESSE
The president of the Union of Officers in Correctional Services of Quebec, Mathieu Lavoie, would not confirm the information obtained byLa Presse . But implore the government to take action to stop the growing deliveries by drones in the 18 prisons in Quebec. "We realize that pilot projects or measures put in place after the escapes of Quebec and St. Jerome did not stop these intrusions," says Mr. Lavoie.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/24/16 07:44 PM

Cazzetta in his younger years.

Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 09/25/16 06:44 PM

Ok so these charges are from 2009. It seems the worst charges are from this current case anyways. He still has a long way to go to get out on this case.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/05/16 12:23 PM

They're at it again.

This time, one of the most storied locations in Montreal Mafia history.

"Le bar de danseuses Solid Gold visé par deux incendies criminels"

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-criminels.php

Posted By: BobbyPazzo

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/05/16 12:31 PM

P
Originally Posted By: antimafia
They're at it again.

This time one of the most storied locations in Montreal Mafia history.

"Le bar de danseuses Solid Gold visé par deux incendies criminels"

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-criminels.php


No English ? What happened A.M.? You have made me extremely interested in OC north of the border. You're a great poster my man.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/05/16 01:51 PM

Originally Posted By: BobbyPazzo
P
Originally Posted By: antimafia
They're at it again.

This time one of the most storied locations in Montreal Mafia history.

"Le bar de danseuses Solid Gold visé par deux incendies criminels"

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-criminels.php


No English ? What happened A.M.? You have made me extremely interested in OC north of the border. You're a great poster my man.


Thanks, BP.

The reporter's story appears to me to be an exclusive, as one of the attacks happened a relatively long time ago (on September 2) and was likely being kept hush-hush by law enforcement. The journalist is probably the only crime reporter who was working on this story. There may be an English-language article that will come out and reference the one to which I linked.

Try using the link below for a Google Translate translation.

Translation
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/05/16 06:30 PM

"Several accused in case targeting alleged Mafia leaders renounce right to preliminary inquiry"

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...minary-inquiry/

------------

Some of the accused who do not want to attend all or part of the preliminary inquiry include Leonardo Rizzuto, Stefano Sollecito, and Alexandra Mongeau (Mom Boucher's daughter).
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/05/16 06:30 PM

Was Moreno Gallo's old headquarters. Interesting. Even a hint that Stefano Sollecito was supposed to take it over. Things will really get interesting if Stefano/Leonardo get out.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/05/16 06:36 PM

Here is the english translation of the Lapresse article.

The Solid Gold dancers bar has been in recent weeks the target of two arson that could be part of the infighting that persist within the Montreal Mafia, told by La Presse .
About 5pm on Wednesday of last week, the alarm system of the establishment in 8820, Saint-Laurent Boulevard sounded, calling the fire brigade on site. After examining the scene, the fire eventually discovered an incendiary device that was launched on the bar of the roof without causing much damage. They handed the file to their partners in the Arson Section of the Police Service of the City of Montreal (SPVM).
September 2, firefighters were called to a blazing vehicle in the parking lot of the establishment. They quickly extinguished the flames that ravaged the reported stolen vehicle, and entrusted the matter to the SPVM.
These two events have all the appearance of messages launched in the context of conflicts between the major factions of the Montreal Mafia since the natural death of the godfather Vito Rizzuto, in December 2013, and Magot Mastiff- police operation, which beheaded organized crime in Montreal on November 19.
The Solid Gold was once the headquarters of the influential Calabrian Moreno Gallo, a Mafia chieftain killed in an ambush in a restaurant in Acapulco, Mexico, in November 2013, presumably for his lack of loyalty to the Sicilians during detention of Vito Rizzuto in the United States.
A source reported in La Presse, that following the death of Gallo. Stefano Sollecito Acting boss of the Montreal Mafia that is currently charged as a result of Magot Mastiff-operation, would have taken control of the Solid Gold establishment, but information on this has not been confirmed by police.
One thing is sure, Gregory Woolley, gang leader arrest from the Magot Mastiff operation who is close to Sollecito and the Hells Angels, was regularly observed by police officers at Solid Gold before his arrest last November.
Arson investigators of SPVM will check if the two events in Solid Gold could be linked to the murders of Moreno Gallo and Rocco Sollecito, that occurred in June.
Both arsons may also be linked with Molotov cocktails launched in recent weeks on Bellerose cafes, Laval, and Empire, Montreal, Restaurant Le Liège in Park Extension, and the John and Dino business in St. Léonard.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/05/16 07:28 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
Was Moreno Gallo's old headquarters. Interesting. Even a hint that Stefano Sollecito was supposed to take it over. Things will really get interesting if Stefano/Leonardo get out.


Stefano is already at home because of his lung cancer.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/05/16 08:30 PM

Vito having that guy hit in mexico might have been his most impressive hit or order. Must have cost some $$$. Or gallos best friends set him up. Him have the spanish guy hit in sicily to.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/05/16 10:36 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
Was Moreno Gallo's old headquarters. Interesting. Even a hint that Stefano Sollecito was supposed to take it over. Things will really get interesting if Stefano/Leonardo get out.


Stefano is already at home because of his lung cancer.


That's right, not sure what I was thinking.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/05/16 10:53 PM

Originally Posted By: pmac
Vito having that guy hit in mexico might have been his most impressive hit or order. Must have cost some $$$. Or gallos best friends set him up. Him have the spanish guy hit in sicily to.


Vito might have ordered the hit but there is another possibility that the Desjardins crew might of also had reasons to order the hit.
Prior to getting killed M.Gallo aligned himself with Montagna. According to a La Presse article, the police recorded a conversation between Desjardins and Mirarchi that they wanted to eliminate Montagna allies.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 01:56 PM

A suspect in the murder of Ferdinano Belmonte has been arrested in Kitchener, Ontario. It is the second link, below, that leads to a French-language article stating that Belmonte had ties to Rocco Sollecito.

"Kitchener man facing murder charge in Laval shooting death.
Laval police arrested a 29-year-old man they believe killed Ferdinando Belmonte this past summer"

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/f...tario-1.3793623

"Un suspect arrêté pour le meurtre de Ferdinando Belmonte"

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/10/06/un-suspect-arrete-pour-le-meurtre-de-ferdinando-belmonte
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 05:59 PM

http://www.vice.com/fr_ca/read/les-hells-angels-de-retour-en-affaires-au-quebec

According to Andre Cedilot organized crime expert, the Ontario Ndrangheta is now in control of Montreal and have formed at alliance with the Hells Angels. The Ontario Ndrangheta will handle the importation of drugs and the Hells will handle the distribution.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 06:30 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.vice.com/fr_ca/read/les-hells-angels-de-retour-en-affaires-au-quebec

According to Andre Cedilot organized crime expert, the Ontario Ndrangheta is now in control of Montreal and have formed at alliance with the Hells Angels. The Ontario Ndrangheta will handle the importation of drugs and the Hells will handle the distribution.


Wow..if true I wonder where the West End crew stands. Those guys need the port.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 07:41 PM

Cedilot has been proposing that theory for years. Back in 2010 he said the same, while we now know that the take-over came from groups within Montreal. I don't believe the Montreal Mafia, which comprises hundreds of associates, will allow Ontario to rule over them. The arguments that are now made against Bonanno influence also apply for Ontario.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 07:59 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Cedilot has been proposing that theory for years. Back in 2010 he said the same, while we now know that the take-over came from groups within Montreal. I don't believe the Montreal Mafia, which comprises hundreds of associates, will allow Ontario to rule over them. The arguments that are now made against Bonanno influence also apply for Ontario.


The Calabrians are only interested in drug and arms trafficking, the HA would be the best partner. They are not interested in controlling the Montreal streets I would think.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 08:00 PM

If all this is true, I don't believe it will change anything for the west end. Provided they cooperate with the new people.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 08:15 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Cedilot has been proposing that theory for years. Back in 2010 he said the same, while we now know that the take-over came from groups within Montreal. I don't believe the Montreal Mafia, which comprises hundreds of associates, will allow Ontario to rule over them. The arguments that are now made against Bonanno influence also apply for Ontario.


I agree with you back in 2010 they were saying the same thing because the Rizzuto clan were dealt with heavy casualties but things started to change in Rizzuto's favor when he was released in 2012. His rivals were dealt with heavy losses too. But now since 2015, the Rizzuto clan are being attacked once again but I do not see much retaliation. So there maybe some truth in what Cedilot is now saying.
It is just my impression of things.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 08:23 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Cedilot has been proposing that theory for years. Back in 2010 he said the same, while we now know that the take-over came from groups within Montreal. I don't believe the Montreal Mafia, which comprises hundreds of associates, will allow Ontario to rule over them. The arguments that are now made against Bonanno influence also apply for Ontario.


The Calabrians are only interested in drug and arms trafficking, the HA would be the best partner. They are not interested in controlling the Montreal streets I would think.


I understand what your saying they will not have a big presence in the streets, they don't have to. But if you control the drugs you more or less control the rest.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 08:56 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Cedilot has been proposing that theory for years. Back in 2010 he said the same, while we now know that the take-over came from groups within Montreal. I don't believe the Montreal Mafia, which comprises hundreds of associates, will allow Ontario to rule over them. The arguments that are now made against Bonanno influence also apply for Ontario.


The Calabrians are only interested in drug and arms trafficking, the HA would be the best partner. They are not interested in controlling the Montreal streets I would think.


I understand what your saying they will not have a big presence in the streets, they don't have to. But if you control the drugs you more or less control the rest.


I think they would leave the local stuff to the Hells Angels, they have the men, those who survived the biker war and newcomers.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 09:18 PM


I agree with you.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 09:52 PM


It is not the translation of the full article. I only took the part that Mentions the Mafia and Ndrangheta:

The Mafia

While the Hells awaiting trial behind bars, Montreal Sicilian Mafia, once at the top of the criminal food chain in the province, was out routed. Incendiary bombs, killings, and reports of infighting had become almost weekly thing.
In the background, we witnessed the violent decline of the Rizzuto family and speculation about who might usurp its central role in the drug trade in the province.
For decades, the Hells have been a drug trafficking engine in Quebec, dealing with distribution throughout the province, while the Mafia was responsible for the import.
André Cédilot is a journalist and expert on organized crime that covers the criminal world in Quebec for over 40 years.
"Before the operation SharQc, the Hells Angels were at the head of the drug market with the Sicilian Mafia," said he told VICE. "The Mafia was responsible for import and Hells Angels were distributors. Internationally, the Mafia has a better reputation than the Hells Angels because the Colombians do not trust the Hells Angels, but they trust the Mafia. "
But now Cédilot said he sees a new alliance between the Hells Angels and the Calabrian Ndrangheta established in Ontario - a tectonic movement after four decades of Sicilian domination. "The Rizzuto family, I believe, is no longer the party," he said. "They do not have control right now, I can tell you that. The Calabrian have control now. "

The Ndrangheta

Following the decline of the Sicilian Mafia after years of infighting and arrests , the Calabrian mobsters of Ontario were able to settle in Montreal. But the Calabrians do not have the local connections or distribution networks but the Hells Angels do.The recent release of high-ranking Hells from prison couldn’t come at a better time for them and for criminal families from Ontario.
"The 'Ndrangheta of Ontario will have an influence in Montreal, much more than the Sicilians have now. It's a new partnership, "according Cédilot. "It is not yet in force, but I can tell you that it is preparing. "
Antonio Nicaso agrees. Nicaso is a professor and author of over 30 books on organized crime, including money or honor: the ultimate battle of Vito Rizzuto."When the Sicilians were in power [the 'Ndrangheta] never had the opportunity to settle in Montreal," he recounts. "It could be an opportunity for the Ndrangheta to form a strategic alliance with a local player. I believe that in future we will see a completely different picture emerge in the world of crime. "
"But there is also a huge opportunity for the biker group," he added. "The Hells Angels want to step it up," he said. "They want to be in direct contact with producers in Colombia, Peru and Bolivia. "
The possibility of an alliance Hells Angels-Ndrangheta, which remains to be confirmed, is a possibility that the SQ is conscious. "It's one of the theories that we contemplate," said Captain Guy Lapointe, adding that the SQ can not say more at the moment, since it does not comment on intelligence or investigations In progress.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 10:26 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
If all this is true, I don't believe it will change anything for the west end. Provided they cooperate with the new people.


Considering the ties between incarcerated West End leader Raymond Desfossés and the bikers that will probably be the case.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/06/16 11:49 PM

I got of hold of the english version Hells/Ndrangheta.

http://www.vice.com/en_ca/read/how-the-hells-angels-made-a-massive-comeback-in-quebec
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/07/16 04:20 AM

Ndrangheta has had the upper hand for awhile now, it's about who controls the connects, NOT MANPOWER.

Not the number of " MADE GUYS " or 500 associates. None of the associates or so called made guys have the connects that Ndrangheta have. The only one with the contacts and respect like that was Vito, which is why the strength died with him. All these guys are going to make deals with the new regime, take it to the bank...

I mean look at the post that was translated. Awhile back a guy made a post about the bikers in Canada, saying they were a power in Montreal or something. I said that if they made their own direct connect, they technically wouldn't even need the mafia. Now I didn't think the Colombians would deal with em, as they have long standing trust with Italians, but the Mexicans, I could see that.


It makes total sense that the Hells would want their own direct connect, that's what enables you to call shots. Look at all the manpower the Bikers had, and all the violence they were capable of. It got em to the table, but not the head seat.

The guy predicting this, or whatever, he's smart. I predicted this and I don't even follow Canada like that. I keep up with the drug trade, and if you got Mexicans everywhere in the US (exception NY, where the Dominicans have dominance, because the Colombians literally have to ship coke through their country, plus their neighborhood in NY hasn't gentrified yet that I know of) and Calabrians everywhere in Europe. Both these groups power is directly proportional to their ability to move narcotics across continents.

Now why did the Rizzutos take over? Drugs, they were the top Italian narcotics guys after the Gambino/Bonnano pizza connection unraveled. Vito going to jail in a US prison gave other groups time to make new connections, kinda like Galantes 12 year bid took him to far out of the loop. Those 12 years were the years Nicolo built his power, same way Vito's ten years away gave the Calabrians an opening to make moves.



Once the Caruana- Cun-Trera clan threw in with the Calabrians, the Rizzutos had serious problems. ( I see them as the Ochoas to the Rizzutos Escobar, I think they are the real power brokers there)


So Mexico=US, NY=Dominicans, Europe and Ontario = Calabrians.This means the Rizzutos Had only Quebec totally under their control. And this control was traditionally based on heroin, which was no longer the dominant force in narcotics, now it's coke. And the Calabrians and Mexicans control all the coke. So if you look at the GLOBAL PICTURE, they were already losing power fast.


I'm not making this shit up, just look at what's going on worldwide, it's the age of the Narcotic syndicate, has been for awhile now...
Posted By: IvyLeague

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/07/16 04:47 AM

I think to say NY=Dominicans is an over simplification.

The 2015 National Drug Threat Assessment reported that Mexican traffickers were expanding their operations to gain a larger share of Northeast markets and were now the most prominent wholesale-level heroin traffickers in the New Jersey, Philadelphia, and Washington, DC, and have greatly expanded their presence in the New York City area. Mexican organization were also said to be involved in wholesale cocaine distribution in the city. In New York City, Colombian organizations transported cocaine into the area and served as a primary source of wholesale quantities of cocaine. However, Mexican and Dominican trafficking organizations dominated the transportation of cocaine throughout the rest of New York State, limiting the role of Colombian organizations. Colombian organizations were also prominent transporters and distributors of wholesale quantities of heroin in New York City. It was also reported that Dominican traffickers were the dominant retail distributors of cocaine in the New York metropolitan area and both Colombian and Mexican TCOs relied on Dominican traffickers to assist in the transportation of heroin throughout New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Massachusetts. In New Jersey, Dominican traffickers handled retail-level distribution of cocaine for Colombian TCOs and also supplied local street gangs, who handled street-level distribution.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/07/16 06:36 AM

@Ivey

If you go through my post, you will see I already know all that. I mention the Dominicans cause guys on here like Pmac say they have like 95% of all the drugs. Rather than argue I just concede the point. ( I don't live in NY, not in tune with the everyday street life you know?) It doesn't change the greater scope of things being coke from Colombia, controlled by Mexicans and Italians from Europe. It's not as complicated as you are making it.

Like I know the Mexicans are in NY, Sinaloa is EVERY GODAMN WHERE IVEY lol. What was the post awhile ago about Sinaloa in upstate NY? Buffalo?
But even that makes you ask, Why did they pick Buffalo for a retail operation and not bigger NY?

I guess It's because there is no major stronghold there, ( Does NY have no Little Village?, or large Mexican area?, I find that hard to believe though....) from which to deal from. The Dominican presence gives em less leverage. It might have been more profitable to have 50%, 70% of the Buffalo trade instead of competing for 10% or less of the NY retail trade. I mean, like your post points out, they still have a lot of the wholesale trade. So a Mexican retail operation in Buffalo gives you a hint of how strong Dominican retail MUST BE IN NY. Mexico, having a land border with the US, can always get coke here cheaper, and with more flexibility, so they will always have MORE COKE than the Dominicans. On the flip side, going through the Dominicans gives the Colombians more negotiating leverage when getting coke into the US. So there is a balance of power that keeps Dominicans and Colombians in partnership, with the Mexicans constantly encroaching, as they maneuver closer and closer to the source countries for narcotics.


Again, it's why I kinda concede the point of Dominicans being dominant in NY, and the northeast. The Colombians kinda have a vested interest in doing business with em. I've described them as "Regional" , not whatever, intercontinental, or transnational, or whatever adjective describes moving drugs from Border to border, country to country.

Anyone following knows the Mexicans are pushing hard into heroin. Better refinement in Mexico, as well as imported fentanyl from China. 5000 for a kilo that you make 80 kilos out of? Something ridiculous like that I read somewhere... As well as producing meth on an industrial scale. Lots of overdoses in Chicago, check some of the Jersey threads and guys on there have lost a lotta friends recently behind heroin.

So everything in your post is true and 100% right, I've been following along. My post was more or less about connecting the power dynamics in Canada with the flow of narcotics. And a kinda central premise that THE RULES OF THE NARCOTICS TRADE TEND TO CLASH WITH TRADITIONAL MAFIA RULES AND PROTOCOL.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/07/16 10:44 AM

Time will tell if they can establish another "consortium" in Montreal.
Posted By: IvyLeague

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/08/16 04:24 AM

Except the Dominicans aren't dominant in NYC. They are a major part of the drug trade but they still basically middle men for the Colombians and Mexicans.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/08/16 05:32 AM

Ivey, the fact that the Dominicans relatively call their own shot, does make them special from other groups. Like this exist ONLY in NY. Everywhere else in the US its Mexicans, period. As long as they get coke for 10 grand a Ki in the Dominican Republic, they will be pretty strong.


Also, like I said, guys from NY say the Dominicans have a lot of the trade, I mean I DONT LIVE IN NY. I don't wanna be an asshole an argue with a guy about what happens in his own city. Like take Philly or Jersey. I leave that to the Philly and Jersey guys like Serp or Bobby or Dante. They know their cities.

Case in point, the thread about the young Jersey guy moving coke for the DeCavalcantes. I was looking at the money he made, 78 grand from a half kilo.
Now Dante said that that basically the Gambinos give em orders and tell them what to do. Now in light of the Calabrian development, I asked what was the chance that the DeCavalcante crew was getting Calabrian coke through the Gambino family, what was the chance that they were like a new Cherry Hill crew moving coke In jersey for the Gambinos. I think it was Pmac who said no, the Dominicans have like 90% control.

Now, it seems weird that a NY mobster would get coke from Dominicans to me, but again I don't live there, they might do this everyday of the week for all I know.

The fact is this Ivey, the Colombians still control a good portion of the NY trade through the Dominicans, but the Mexican are relentless. I asked the question, is there a large Mexican enclave in NY like the Dominicans have? Cause if they did, like the Dominicans had in Washington Heights, they would already rule NYs drug trade too. It's also why I had the Buffalo example. Sinaloa doesn't even retail, ( they mostly wholesale from what I've read, but I'm sure they have more than a few operations around the country...) but they had a retail operation in BUFFALO? Why not Brooklyn? Or Queens? The Bronx? Then look at the distributors, street level black guys, Why not Hispanic traffickers? Makes you ask questions.....

Posted By: IvyLeague

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/08/16 06:55 AM

First, New York and the rest of the Northeast have been the last region the Mexicans have moved into simply because of geographic distance.

Second, the Mexicans face more competition from other groups in New York City than pretty much anywhere else in the country. There you not only have the Colombians and Dominicans, you also have Cubans, Jamaicans, Asians, as well as the Italians and others.

On a side note, somebody's knowledge based on simply living in an area only goes so far. One's zip code doesn't automatically afford them special insight on things. I can learn more from just reading the latest Drug Threat Assessment from the DEAD or HIDTA report than reading posts from a dozen New York posters on the boards.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/08/16 12:29 PM

@Ivey

Seriously, how many times I gotta agree with you before you stop arguing about nothing?


We have had this convo before, you said NY was very competitive as far as narcotics, I said only at the street retail level. At the top it's a Colombian or a Mexican if you are in the US, and the ONLY place you will run into a Colombian, or Colombian proxy (Dominicans) is NY, and the Northeast. Why are you repeating literally my whole point, acting like I never said it?

My entire premise on drug clans, remember the Rizzuto/Fernandez questions, that thread? My whole thing was the Mexicans had the US, and Calabrians had Europe. So where did it leave the Rizzutos. Not for nothing but Ive been following the drugs, not counting up made guys or any of that.

And don't go and get silly on me. The Mexicans got thrown outta Spain years ago. Sinaloa is operational in Europe. They have been moving heavy narcotics since the early 90s maybe late 80s at least. You really believe they couldn't get drugs to NY because it's too far? Lol, Ivey you are talking about a truck, nothing more. ( watch Traffic, especially the part where he mentions NAFTA )They have the BORDER, coke comes into Chicago and goes EVERYWHERE. Carrillo was the " Lord of the Skies" way back when, they can't get coke to NY? Cause it's too far? Yet the whole reason they got big is that the COLOMBIANS could no longer reliably get coke through the Caribbean route, and trusted the Mexicans to get coke into the country. You don't seem to get that their WHOLE STRENGHT WAS BASED OFF TRANSPORTATION.


Im the one who told you before you can't control a city Like NY on the street level, it's too many corners/distribution points to try to control. Only ethnic enclaves like the old Italian Harlem where Ormento operated, as well as Pleaseant Ave. Nicky Barnes in Harlem, where you can sell in the streets. Otherwise you need a specific distribution points like Genovese with his midtown nightclubs, or the Pizza connection. You can only do it with supply, and the supply is controlled by Mexicans and Colombians. You brought up these other groups before, and this was the argument I gave you.


You started off in agreement in this thread, now you are reversing. We just established no one moves more coke than Mexicans and Colombian backed Dominicans in the US. But then you say, no the Dominicans aren't dominant NY, even though they are, cause none of these groups you mention have cocaine being shipped through their country. (Jamaica did in the past, Chinese? No. Maybe Cubans, but it can't be easy for them to get coke through Cuba into the US. And their stronghold is Miami, not NY. Aren't you labeled a defector or some shit if you leave?) You are not getting it, a Ki of coke in the Dominican Republic is 10 grand. Unless these groups go to Central America or something, they are NOT GETTING IT THAT CHEAP.

I just gave you a whole scenario with Sinaloa retailing in Buffalo, as an example of how intense it must be in NY if they set up shop there, not Brooklyn or somewhere. All those groups you mentioned, the ONLY ONE GROUP, that could compete with Mexican prices for coke, ARE DOMINICANS. The Chinese can't beat their prices, nor can any middle eastern group, or Russians, or Albanians, or Puerto Ricans, African Americans, Greeks, no one. And I was the one pointing out how the Calabrians didn't even attempt to move a GRAM of coke in NY, even though they have access to an avalanche of the shit.

Do you understand geographic distance is a big part of why cocaine cost what it does? The Mexicans would LOVE to supply Australia, it's like a hundred grand for a Ki. Again, the Dominicans been established in NY, they have a larger population there, and they pretty much can match Mexican prices. But the Mexicans have ACCESS TO MORE COCAINE THAN THEM. And more control over the coke they move.
Posted By: IvyLeague

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/08/16 07:09 PM

Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
@Ivey

Seriously, how many times I gotta agree with you before you stop arguing about nothing?


We have had this convo before, you said NY was very competitive as far as narcotics, I said only at the street retail level. At the top it's a Colombian or a Mexican if you are in the US, and the ONLY place you will run into a Colombian, or Colombian proxy (Dominicans) is NY, and the Northeast. Why are you repeating literally my whole point, acting like I never said it?


There can be a number of wholesale levels between the the initial supply and retail levels.


Quote:
And don't go and get silly on me. The Mexicans got thrown outta Spain years ago. Sinaloa is operational in Europe. They have been moving heavy narcotics since the early 90s maybe late 80s at least. You really believe they couldn't get drugs to NY because it's too far? Lol, Ivey you are talking about a truck, nothing more. ( watch Traffic, especially the part where he mentions NAFTA )They have the BORDER, coke comes into Chicago and goes EVERYWHERE. Carrillo was the " Lord of the Skies" way back when, they can't get coke to NY? Cause it's too far? Yet the whole reason they got big is that the COLOMBIANS could no longer reliably get coke through the Caribbean route, and trusted the Mexicans to get coke into the country. You don't seem to get that their WHOLE STRENGHT WAS BASED OFF TRANSPORTATION.


You can go back and read law enforcement reports for the past 20 years. Which, by the way, is a better way to get an understanding of things than theorizing and pontificating or talking with posters on Internet forums. Generally speaking, earlier on it was the Mexicans in the western half of the country and the Colombians in the eastern half. As you go forward, year after year, you see a gradual movement eastward by Mexicans. It wasn't that long ago that they were only beginning to have a significant presence on the east coast. At first, it was more the lower half of the eastern seaboard, getting to the point where they were the dominant suppliers everywhere except Southern Florida where they were rivaled by the Colombians. You then see a move northward on the coast, and on the last few years they had become the top suppliers as far north as Philadelphia and South Jersey. Yet, even now, they don't have the same dominance in the rest of the Northeast like they do throughout the rest of the US. What else is the reason if not distance and competition?

Quote:
Im the one who told you before you can't control a city Like NY on the street level, it's too many corners/distribution points to try to control. Only ethnic enclaves like the old Italian Harlem where Ormento operated, as well as Pleaseant Ave. Nicky Barnes in Harlem, where you can sell in the streets. Otherwise you need a specific distribution points like Genovese with his midtown nightclubs, or the Pizza connection. You can only do it with supply, and the supply is controlled by Mexicans and Colombians. You brought up these other groups before, and this was the argument I gave you.

You started off in agreement in this thread, now you are reversing. We just established no one moves more coke than Mexicans and Colombian backed Dominicans in the US. But then you say, no the Dominicans aren't dominant NY, even though they are, cause none of these groups you mention have cocaine being shipped through their country. (Jamaica did in the past, Chinese? No. Maybe Cubans, but it can't be easy for them to get coke through Cuba into the US. And their stronghold is Miami, not NY. Aren't you labeled a defector or some shit if you leave?) You are not getting it, a Ki of coke in the Dominican Republic is 10 grand. Unless these groups go to Central America or something, they are NOT GETTING IT THAT CHEAP.


I'm not reversing anything. The Colombians and Mexicans, along with their Dominican wholesalers, certainly move the most drugs in the city but there are other groups who do supply lesser amounts, as well as provide competition at lower distribution levels. You would know this if you'd do more reading instead if just trying to theorize and read the tea leaves in your own. Cuban and Jamaican groups are significant suppliers of marijuana, for example. Asian groups supply marijuana too, as well as ecstasy. Read the 2009 NDTA or some other reports and you'll see Italian groups also facilitate movement of cocaine, marijuana, ecstasy, and heroin through POE's.

As important as Dominicans are, the definition of "dominant" (most important, powerful, or influential) does not accurately describe their position in the NYC drug trade. At least it's an over simplification, as I originally said.

Quote:
I just gave you a whole scenario with Sinaloa retailing in Buffalo, as an example of how intense it must be in NY if they set up shop there, not Brooklyn or somewhere. All those groups you mentioned, the ONLY ONE GROUP, that could compete with Mexican prices for coke, ARE DOMINICANS. The Chinese can't beat their prices, nor can any middle eastern group, or Russians, or Albanians, or Puerto Ricans, African Americans, Greeks, no one. And I was the one pointing out how the Calabrians didn't even attempt to move a GRAM of coke in NY, even though they have access to an avalanche of the shit.


Perhaps the difference is you're talking about cocaine alone while I'm talking about the entire drug trade.

Quote:
Do you understand geographic distance is a big part of why cocaine cost what it does? The Mexicans would LOVE to supply Australia, it's like a hundred grand for a Ki. Again, the Dominicans been established in NY, they have a larger population there, and they pretty much can match Mexican prices. But the Mexicans have ACCESS TO MORE COCAINE THAN THEM. And more control over the coke they move.


Wait, is that why a kilo of cocaine can sell for $2,000 in Peru, $10,000 in Mexico, and $30,000 on the US side of the border? Gee, thanks for the breaking news Cabrini. whistle
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/09/16 06:35 AM

Ivey, I'm seriously starting to wonder about you.......



First of all, I've kinda made a reputation as the poster who talks narcotics, BIG PERCENT OF THE TIME, yet you act like I haven't posted ad nauseum about all this shit, it's really funny. You are the one ALWAYS TALKING ABOUT FUCKIN GAMBLING LOL.. Like every time I bring up drugs it's always, " The five families have been marginalized" , " the biggest money maker is gambling", all of a sudden now here you go......

Remember the discussion about the Rizzutos, when I broke down how all or this shit revolves around the drug trade, I didn't hear any of this shit from you then, yet you think you know more about it than me now? Dude....


I read constantly, and everything, again, you act like you are the only person who knows how to read and interpret facts, and like your data or stats are the only thing that matters, you really kill me. And the funny thing is, you google Dominicans cocaine and NY, I mean, lol you act like this is all speculation or some shit, you don't have to take my word, wtf? And I'm sorry, but I gotta respect the word of a guy who lives In The city and sees what what.


You crack me up on the geography thing. I don't even think you know it's the Zeta cartel that most indentified with trafficking in NY. And it makes sense, they are based on the Gulf, all the states that border the Gulf are basically the same states at the end of the Caribbean route, Florida, Louisiana. The Gulf has 7 of the ten busiest ports in the US. Lots of camouflage for contraband. Now when you talk of the recent decline, like are you keeping up with Mexico? Lots of reports are that the Zetas are no longer operational. I JUST ASKED SMEARY ABOUT IT IN ONE OF HIS CARTEL THREADS, I DIDNT SEE BOO FROM YOU, NO POST NOTHING. Yet you act like you know now? Come on man..... You do realize I live in Chicago, Sinaloas home base. Where Zambadas son was locked up in the loop? Where the Flores brothers dealt thousands of kilos? You have any idea how many local articles have come out during even the last 10 years? Read a report, you gotta be kidding me....

The Dominicans are to coke on the east coast what Vietnamese gangs are to heroin and high grade weed on the west coast. Do a google, don't take my word for it, RESEARCH....

Edit: Also, I've READ reports, that coke seizures in the Caribbean are up the last couple years. This empowers Dominicans more than any other carribean crime group. This is something else I've mentioned, how the normalization of Cuban relations will lead to a more porous Caribbean route, and it puts pressure on the Mexicans to find more markets, again the push into the Northeast, it's ALL CONNECTED......



And you keep repeating shit I JUST SAID, like what is wrong with you? I just said the Mexicans are constantly encroaching, ON EVERYONES TERRITORY, MAN NOT JUST NY. Europe, Australia, Asia, these people are trying to position themselves all over the world. And here you go with some snarky comment, read the reports of the last 20 years, oh my god, give me a fuckin break. I grew up in an open air drug market, I don't need to consume every piece of literature to have a greater understanding of how this works.

Your sarcasm, lol "Wait is that why a Ki.." Look, if you understand all that I shouldn't have to explain why the Dominicans have leverage in NY, with the country being a transshipment point. It should be self evident.

You say, Read more, smh, LET ME ILLUSTRATE MY FRUSTRATION FOR YOU.
Remember this thread? It's about calculating the mafias total income, right?

http://www.gangsterbb.net/threads/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=892984#Post892984


Now this guy says 24 bil for drugs, right? You go right along with this, as you can see from your responses right? But look at my last two post, it became clear to me I WAS THE ONLY POSTER WHO ACTUALLY READ THE THING.
Look at what is said on page 13......

Drug markets: estimating financial value
Illicit drug markets are complex systems of production and distribution that generate large sums of money at di erent levels. A conservative estimate values the retail market for illicit drugs in the European Union at EUR 24.3 billion in 2013 (likely range EUR 21 billion to EUR 31 billion). With an estimated retail value of EUR 9.3 billion (likely range EUR 8.4–12.9 billion), and responsible for about 38 % of the total, cannabis products account for the largest share of the illicit drug market in Europe. is is followed by heroin, estimated at EUR 6.8 billion (EUR 6.0–7.8 billion) (28 %), and cocaine at EUR 5.7 billion (EUR 4.5–7.0 billion) (24 %). Amphetamines occupy a smaller market share, estimated at EUR 1.8 billion (EUR 1.2–2.5 billion) (8 %), ahead of MDMA, at almost EUR 0.7 billion (EUR 0.61–0.72 billion) (3 %). These estimates are based on very limited data, which has necessitated some broad assumptions, and hence must be viewed as initial minimum estimates that need revision in the future, as the information underpinning them is improved.

So this was basically a bullshit, incomplete report. But I'm SURE you didn't READ the whole thing, just from your responses. You don't know the agenda behind this. The guy could be trying to downplay the official report to make Europe look better, to attract more foreign investment or who the fuck knows what.

Now take this one, which I can't help but notice I don't see you in......

http://www.gangsterbb.net/threads/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=894721#Post894721


They are saying they seized 35000 kilos in a year. Like there are 35000 kilos in a room somewhere, that you can touch with your hands. And this might be a quarter of what was shipped they say. The retail value of this is like at least triple what they estimated for ALL NARCOTICS, and this is just cocaine. Don't tell me I don't read man.

I pay attention to EVERYTHING. When I see BlackFam post about an Atlanta hustler with an organization stretching to Boston, supplied by Mexicans, it proposes a question in my head, What Cartel? I see something like that and it makes me question the shit I read earlier about the Zetas being dismantled, see what I mean? When I see the cartel in Costa Rica working with the Calabrians, I wonder, what cartel is that? You can't understand what's happening with the Italians, if you pay no attention to South and Central America. What's happening in South America affects the criminal landscape of NY, Canada and the Entirety of Europe, GLOBALIZATION, it's what I'm talking about. YOU ONLY LOOK AT NY AND THINK YOU GOT THE WHOLE PICTURE, you don't......

Alright thats enough for one night, good lord man you bring out the debater in me lol
Posted By: IvyLeague

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/09/16 05:57 PM

Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
Ivey, I'm seriously starting to wonder about you.......



First of all, I've kinda made a reputation as the poster who talks narcotics, BIG PERCENT OF THE TIME, yet you act like I haven't posted ad nauseum about all this shit, it's really funny. You are the one ALWAYS TALKING ABOUT FUCKIN GAMBLING LOL.. Like every time I bring up drugs it's always, " The five families have been marginalized" , " the biggest money maker is gambling", all of a sudden now here you go......


And what I said is all true. You can look at narcotics alone if you want, and it certainly is the most lucrative racket in terms of total dollars, but not for the LCN. Gambling is a bigger money maker for the American mob, not because it's more lucrative than drugs, but because the mob has more involvement and control in gambling than it does in the drug trade.

Quote:
Remember the discussion about the Rizzutos, when I broke down how all or this shit revolves around the drug trade, I didn't hear any of this shit from you then, yet you think you know more about it than me now? Dude....


If you mean the conflict in Montreal revolved around the drug trade, I would agree.

Quote:
I read constantly, and everything, again, you act like you are the only person who knows how to read and interpret facts, and like your data or stats are the only thing that matters, you really kill me. And the funny thing is, you google Dominicans cocaine and NY, I mean, lol you act like this is all speculation or some shit, you don't have to take my word, wtf? And I'm sorry, but I gotta respect the word of a guy who lives In The city and sees what what.


I'm not saying those in a given area don't have something to offer. But their knowledge is going to be on an anecdotal, micro level. In terms of big picture, there are far better sources than some dude on an Internet message board. And, having been on these forums for over 10 years now, I can tell you you'll get a better idea of things by going with official info than some guy's 2 cents.

Quote:
You crack me up on the geography thing. I don't even think you know it's the Zeta cartel that most indentified with trafficking in NY. And it makes sense, they are based on the Gulf, all the states that border the Gulf are basically the same states at the end of the Caribbean route, Florida, Louisiana. The Gulf has 7 of the ten busiest ports in the US. Lots of camouflage for contraband. Now when you talk of the recent decline, like are you keeping up with Mexico? Lots of reports are that the Zetas are no longer operational. I JUST ASKED SMEARY ABOUT IT IN ONE OF HIS CARTEL THREADS, I DIDNT SEE BOO FROM YOU, NO POST NOTHING. Yet you act like you know now? Come on man..... You do realize I live in Chicago, Sinaloas home base. Where Zambadas son was locked up in the loop? Where the Flores brothers dealt thousands of kilos? You have any idea how many local articles have come out during even the last 10 years? Read a report, you gotta be kidding me....


I'm not sure why you assume if I don't post in a certain thread, I'm not familiar with the topic. I'm become a lot more busy in the last few years and I have to be more selective about posting. Typically the titles of Smeary's threads are enough to make me skip them.

As far as the rest of what you said above, you are all over the place. You living in Chicago is irrelevant to this discussion. And I'm not sure what point you're trying to make about the Zetas in relation to New York and the rest of the Northeast being the last region of the country the Mexicans don't have dominance over.

Quote:
The Dominicans are to coke on the east coast what Vietnamese gangs are to heroin and high grade weed on the west coast. Do a google, don't take my word for it, RESEARCH....


Again, nobody said the Dominicans aren't very significant on the East Coast drug trade. I simply said you saying "Dominicans=NY" is an oversimplification and them being "dominant" isn't true, at least as far as the definition of that word goes.

Quote:
And you keep repeating shit I JUST SAID, like what is wrong with you? I just said the Mexicans are constantly encroaching, ON EVERYONES TERRITORY, MAN NOT JUST NY. Europe, Australia, Asia, these people are trying to position themselves all over the world. And here you go with some snarky comment, read the reports of the last 20 years, oh my god, give me a fuckin break. I grew up in an open air drug market, I don't need to consume every piece of literature to have a greater understanding of how this works.


You do need to read to get a more macro, big picture idea of things. Your personal, anecdotal experiences won't give you that.

Quote:
Your sarcasm, lol "Wait is that why a Ki.." Look, if you understand all that I shouldn't have to explain why the Dominicans have leverage in NY, with the country being a transshipment point. It should be self evident.


But you didn't say Dominicans "have leverage" in New York. You said "Dominicans=NY" and they're "dominant." Not the same thing.

Quote:
You say, Read more, smh, LET ME ILLUSTRATE MY FRUSTRATION FOR YOU.
Remember this thread? It's about calculating the mafias total income, right?

http://www.gangsterbb.net/threads/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=892984#Post892984


Now this guy says 24 bil for drugs, right? You go right along with this, as you can see from your responses right? But look at my last two post, it became clear to me I WAS THE ONLY POSTER WHO ACTUALLY READ THE THING.
Look at what is said on page 13......

Drug markets: estimating financial value
Illicit drug markets are complex systems of production and distribution that generate large sums of money at di erent levels. A conservative estimate values the retail market for illicit drugs in the European Union at EUR 24.3 billion in 2013 (likely range EUR 21 billion to EUR 31 billion). With an estimated retail value of EUR 9.3 billion (likely range EUR 8.4–12.9 billion), and responsible for about 38 % of the total, cannabis products account for the largest share of the illicit drug market in Europe. is is followed by heroin, estimated at EUR 6.8 billion (EUR 6.0–7.8 billion) (28 %), and cocaine at EUR 5.7 billion (EUR 4.5–7.0 billion) (24 %). Amphetamines occupy a smaller market share, estimated at EUR 1.8 billion (EUR 1.2–2.5 billion) (8 %), ahead of MDMA, at almost EUR 0.7 billion (EUR 0.61–0.72 billion) (3 %). These estimates are based on very limited data, which has necessitated some broad assumptions, and hence must be viewed as initial minimum estimates that need revision in the future, as the information underpinning them is improved.

So this was basically a bullshit, incomplete report. But I'm SURE you didn't READ the whole thing, just from your responses. You don't know the agenda behind this. The guy could be trying to downplay the official report to make Europe look better, to attract more foreign investment or who the fuck knows what.


I realize the report isnt exhaustive or complete. One thing that stuck out from the start was the lack of estimates of not only other illicit activities but also legitimate businesses. I simply said I found those conservative estimates to be closer to the truth than the more extreme figures we often see published.

Quote:
I pay attention to EVERYTHING. When I see BlackFam post about an Atlanta hustler with an organization stretching to Boston, supplied by Mexicans, it proposes a question in my head, What Cartel? I see something like that and it makes me question the shit I read earlier about the Zetas being dismantled, see what I mean? When I see the cartel in Costa Rica working with the Calabrians, I wonder, what cartel is that? You can't understand what's happening with the Italians, if you pay no attention to South and Central America. What's happening in South America affects the criminal landscape of NY, Canada and the Entirety of Europe, GLOBALIZATION, it's what I'm talking about. YOU ONLY LOOK AT NY AND THINK YOU GOT THE WHOLE PICTURE, you don't.....


Some of what's going on globally affects things in New York, other things not so much. The drug trade, which you focus on, certainly. This involves people from other countries moving drugs and money across international borders.

But when we're talking about the NY Mafia, which is what I assume you are referring to when you mention New York, drugs are only one factor and not the most important one. Understanding the mob's current position in the drug trade alone, or having a good idea of the drug trade on a global basis alone, isn't going to give you a complete or necessarily accurate idea of the current overall state of the NY mob. Things you seem to overlook or not consider that important or maybe just boring, such as membership, are more crucial.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/09/16 07:06 PM

Dominicans are very transient. Travling from nyc to where ever they call home next. Just in mass boston worcester springfield they live in all and travel to them all there biggest community outside of washington heights is Lawrence ma which is on the nh border close to the ocean. Herion coke pipeline. And ive come to find out they work hand n hand with the mexicans. Just look at the huge busts in the last year. Little of both.
Posted By: DiLorenzo

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/09/16 08:17 PM

Ever see this video of Vic Cotroni ??

[video:youtube]https://youtu.be/RJsm0IhsJfo[/video]
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/10/16 01:06 AM

Thats from the "Connections" series. They caught him off guard, and basically bombarded him with questions. There's a story in the James Dubro book, Mob Rule. Where they tried to do that once outside one of his social clubs and had guys with camera's and mics hiding in a van outside. Cotroni basically lured the interviewer into the club without his camera crew, and the author explains that the host saw a bunch of shadowy figures and they were all Cotroni soldiers, they basically surrounded the guy under Cotroni's orders, chased him out the club and had the film crew scared to move the van because the guys knew they were inside. Funny shit.
Posted By: Mick2010

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/10/16 03:59 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Thats from the "Connections" series. They caught him off guard, and basically bombarded him with questions. There's a story in the James Dubro book, Mob Rule. Where they tried to do that once outside one of his social clubs and had guys with camera's and mics hiding in a van outside. Cotroni basically lured the interviewer into the club without his camera crew, and the author explains that the host saw a bunch of shadowy figures and they were all Cotroni soldiers, they basically surrounded the guy under Cotroni's orders, chased him out the club and had the film crew scared to move the van because the guys knew they were inside. Funny shit.


i believe that story youre refering to is actually about the commissos in toronto. Remo Commisso at the casa commisso which was on keele st. near either lawrence or st. clair.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 12:54 AM

Vincenzo Spagnolo has been murdered in Laval. Yet another mobster killed who has ancestry descending from Cattolica Eraclea.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 12:57 AM

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/10/15/le-mafieux-vincenzo-spagnolo-abattu-a-laval

Translation:

Saturday, October 15, 2016 8:20 p.m.
Update Saturday, October 15, 2016 8:20 p.m.
LAVAL - The mafia... Vincenzo Spagnolo was shot dead in the Vimont district of Laval late Saturday afternoon, learned our Bureau of Investigation.
He was taken to hospital where his death was confirmed.
Spagnolo was a close friend of the former godfather of the Montreal Mafia Vito Rizzuto. He has been a confidant and right arm of Rizzuto when the latter returned from his prison in Colorado.
An investigation is underway to determine the exact circumstances of the murder. This is the service of the investigation of crimes against the person of the Sûreté du Québec who took the matter in hand.
Sergeant Audrey-Anne Bilodeau, spokesperson for the SQ, rushed to the scene to maintain relations with the media, did not confirm the identity of the person shot dead Saturday on Laval territory, limiting itself to saying that he is a man in his sixties and could be subject to "a settling of accounts linked to organized crime."

"The man was suffering from at least one gun shot at his residence," said Ms. Bilodeau, adding that the event occurred on the street Antoine-Forestier 17 to 30 h.
The name of Vincenzo Spagnolo was mentioned in documents from the Colosseum project, which were presented in the framework of the Commission on the award of contract in construction.
In these documents, including one said he was present at the wedding ceremony of Giulia Arcadi, daughter of the former head of the Mafia interim, Francesco Arcadi.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 01:02 AM



Wow..one of the leaders it never stops.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 01:30 AM

I know, nobody wants to wave the white flag.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 01:42 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
I know, nobody wants to wave the white flag.


That he became a target is a bit suprising he always kept a low profile, running a restaurant.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 03:11 AM

Originally Posted By: Hollander


Wow..one of the leaders it never stops.


You might have been thinking of Vincenzo Spagnolo's son.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 04:47 AM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...tue-a-laval.php

translation:

The mafioso Vincenzo Spagnolo, former right-hand man and friend of the deceased godfather Vito Rizzuto, was killed Saturday night in Laval.
For now, we ignore the circumstances of the crime. It seems that Vincenzo Spagnolo, who had just celebrated his 65th birthday, was at home on the Antoine-Forestier Street in the Vimont district, when he was hit by gunfire around 17:30. He was taken to hospital where his death was confirmed. Since this is a murder linked to organized crime, the Laval police handed the case to their colleagues in the Crimes against the person of the Sûreté du Québec.
Vincenzo Spagnolo was the best friend and confidant of Vito Rizzuto, the former godfather of the Montreal Mafia died naturally in December 2013. Some sources even claim that the two men were cousins. Vincenzo Spagnolo was one of those who had received the godfather in Toronto in October 2012, when Vito Rizzuto returned to Canada after spending six years in US jails for his involvement in the murders of three captains of the Bonanno clan committed New York in 1981.
While he was in prison in Quebec, waiting to be extradited to the United States, Vito Rizzuto called Vincenzo Spagnolo almost as much as his wife, reveals the book Mafia Inc. journalists André Noël and André Cédilot.
After the arrest of Vito Rizzuto for a case of 32 tons of hashish seized off Sept-Îles in 1988, Vincenzo Spagnolo was willing to pay a million dollars for the deposit of his friend, also recall Cédilot and Andre Noel.
Spagnolo had owned a reception hall named buffet Roma . According to our information, he was also a silent owner of Romcafé Laval, a place where Vito Rizzuto had made his headquarters during his bloody return to power in fall 2012 and winter 2013. Spagnolo also controlled, at least until recently, Bellerose coffee, another head quarter for the Sicilian clan of Laval which targeted by a Molotov cocktail in the last few weeks.
In January 2003, Vincenzo Spagnolo was among seven companions-among them Giuseppe Di Maulo and Francesco Arcadi- who made a golf trip with Vito Rizzuto in the Dominican Republic, while they were closely monitored by the investigators of police operation “Colosse”, anti-mafia investigation.
In October 2014, several individuals linked to Sicilian Clan gathered at Buonanotte restaurant to celebrate the birthday of Vincenzo Spagnolo when police squad “Eclipse” invited themselves at the party.
Although he was very present in the entourage of the former godfather, Vincenzo Spagnolo was not recognized as being very involved in the criminal operations of the clan. Sources noted that he was to Vito Rizzuto what Gaetan Gosselin was for Raynald Desjardins, and Vincenzo Scuderi, for the deceased clan chief Giuseppe De Vito. Scuderi and Gosselin, men of confidence and friend of De Vito and Desjardins, two rivals of the Sicilians, were killed during the return to power of Vito Rizzuto winter 2013. "The death of Spagnolo is the same message. Some see it that way. Your reign is over (Sicilians), let go, "said one observer in the know to La Presse .
Spagnolo death could have a moral impact on the remaining members of the Rizzuto clan. Sources had told La Presse that Raynald Desjardins was particularly moved by the death of his friend Gaetan Gosselin.
One thing is certain, the systematic extermination of the Sicilian clan seems to continue, even after the assassinations of Vito Rizzuto last lieutenant , Rocco Sollecito, in May, and Lorenzo Giordano in March. Recalling events a few weeks ago, Molotov cocktails were thrown at the Bellerose coffee and also at Empire bar, another stronghold of the Rizzuto on Jean-Talon Street in Montreal.
Officially, however, the police still considers Stefano Sollecito, the son of Rocco Sollecito, as the head of the Montreal Mafia, and that the latter is still predominantly Sicilian, but things are slowly changing.
The son of Vincenzo Spagnolo, Nicola, had served on the mafia management table before it broke out following the death of Rocco Sollecito.
To join Daniel Renaud confidentially, call (514) 285-7000, extension 4918, or write to the postal address of La Presse.
Posted By: SonnyBlackstein

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 05:34 AM

Great posts Ciment and Antimafia.

Appreciated gents.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 11:13 AM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: Hollander


Wow..one of the leaders it never stops.


You might have been thinking of Vincenzo Spagnolo's son.


Yes I thought Nicola, but the Spagnolos go back a long way that whole family is important.
Posted By: BobbyPazzo

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 12:29 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...tue-a-laval.php

translation:

The mafioso Vincenzo Spagnolo, former right-hand man and friend of the deceased godfather Vito Rizzuto, was killed Saturday night in Laval.
For now, we ignore the circumstances of the crime. It seems that Vincenzo Spagnolo, who had just celebrated his 65th birthday, was at home on the Antoine-Forestier Street in the Vimont district, when he was hit by gunfire around 17:30. He was taken to hospital where his death was confirmed. Since this is a murder linked to organized crime, the Laval police handed the case to their colleagues in the Crimes against the person of the Sûreté du Québec.
Vincenzo Spagnolo was the best friend and confidant of Vito Rizzuto, the former godfather of the Montreal Mafia died naturally in December 2013. Some sources even claim that the two men were cousins. Vincenzo Spagnolo was one of those who had received the godfather in Toronto in October 2012, when Vito Rizzuto returned to Canada after spending six years in US jails for his involvement in the murders of three captains of the Bonanno clan committed New York in 1981.
While he was in prison in Quebec, waiting to be extradited to the United States, Vito Rizzuto called Vincenzo Spagnolo almost as much as his wife, reveals the book Mafia Inc. journalists André Noël and André Cédilot.
After the arrest of Vito Rizzuto for a case of 32 tons of hashish seized off Sept-Îles in 1988, Vincenzo Spagnolo was willing to pay a million dollars for the deposit of his friend, also recall Cédilot and Andre Noel.
Spagnolo had owned a reception hall named buffet Roma . According to our information, he was also a silent owner of Romcafé Laval, a place where Vito Rizzuto had made his headquarters during his bloody return to power in fall 2012 and winter 2013. Spagnolo also controlled, at least until recently, Bellerose coffee, another head quarter for the Sicilian clan of Laval which targeted by a Molotov cocktail in the last few weeks.
In January 2003, Vincenzo Spagnolo was among seven companions-among them Giuseppe Di Maulo and Francesco Arcadi- who made a golf trip with Vito Rizzuto in the Dominican Republic, while they were closely monitored by the investigators of police operation “Colosse”, anti-mafia investigation.
In October 2014, several individuals linked to Sicilian Clan gathered at Buonanotte restaurant to celebrate the birthday of Vincenzo Spagnolo when police squad “Eclipse” invited themselves at the party.
Although he was very present in the entourage of the former godfather, Vincenzo Spagnolo was not recognized as being very involved in the criminal operations of the clan. Sources noted that he was to Vito Rizzuto what Gaetan Gosselin was for Raynald Desjardins, and Vincenzo Scuderi, for the deceased clan chief Giuseppe De Vito. Scuderi and Gosselin, men of confidence and friend of De Vito and Desjardins, two rivals of the Sicilians, were killed during the return to power of Vito Rizzuto winter 2013. "The death of Spagnolo is the same message. Some see it that way. Your reign is over (Sicilians), let go, "said one observer in the know to La Presse .
Spagnolo death could have a moral impact on the remaining members of the Rizzuto clan. Sources had told La Presse that Raynald Desjardins was particularly moved by the death of his friend Gaetan Gosselin.
One thing is certain, the systematic extermination of the Sicilian clan seems to continue, even after the assassinations of Vito Rizzuto last lieutenant , Rocco Sollecito, in May, and Lorenzo Giordano in March. Recalling events a few weeks ago, Molotov cocktails were thrown at the Bellerose coffee and also at Empire bar, another stronghold of the Rizzuto on Jean-Talon Street in Montreal.
Officially, however, the police still considers Stefano Sollecito, the son of Rocco Sollecito, as the head of the Montreal Mafia, and that the latter is still predominantly Sicilian, but things are slowly changing.
The son of Vincenzo Spagnolo, Nicola, had served on the mafia management table before it broke out following the death of Rocco Sollecito.
To join Daniel Renaud confidentially, call (514) 285-7000, extension 4918, or write to the postal address of La Presse.

You don't have to agree with the shit that's going down up there but you gotta respect it. These guys play the game for real. Great posts guys.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 05:35 PM

Seems to be a revenge killing that could be related back to Vito Rizzuto's return in 2012.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 06:08 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Seems to be a revenge killing that could be related back to Vito Rizzuto's return in 2012.


He was Vito's closest friend.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 09:25 PM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-sa-demeure.php

Translation:

CHRISTIANE DESJARDINS
La Presse
It was 5:25 p.m. on this sunny Saturday in October. Vincenzo Spagnolo and his wife were in their home Vimont. Someone rang the doorbell.The man of 65, former right hand of the deceased godfather Vito Rizzuto, went to open the door. To his misfortune, he was shot several times. At least eight, which left him with no chance.
This is, in summary, is what happened Saturday on Antoine-Forestier Street, according to a source. The suspect is a man with dark skin of about 25, who was wearing a black coat with a hood. The Sûreté du Québec, however, refused to confirm or deny this information.
The assassination of Vincenzo Spagnolo is in what appears to be the systematic extermination of the Sicilian mafia. Earlier this year in May, Rocco Sollecito met the same fate. A month earlier, in March, it was Lorenzo Giordano that had been eliminated.
Mr. Spagnolo was very close to the big boss of the Mafia, Vito Rizzuto, before he dies of natural causes in hospital in December 2013. Mr. Spagnolo is one of those who welcomed Mr. Rizzuto in Toronto during his return to Canada in 2012. the latter was returning home after serving six years in prison in the US for his involvement in the murders of three mobsters committed in 1981 in New York.
Mr. Spagnolo has owned halls, including Roma Buffet. Reportedly, he was silent owner Romcafé Laval, where Vito Rizzuto was holding his headquarters in 2012 and 2013, during the bloody resumption of power. Mr. Spagnolo also controlled, at least until recently, Bellerose coffee, another stronghold of Sicilian Clan in Laval. It was the target of a Molotov cocktail, a few weeks ago. In Montreal, the Empire bar, another stronghold of the Rizzuto, was also the target of Molotov cocktails

Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 09:48 PM

Mob expert Antonio Nicaso told CJAD News one thing's not clear.
"If this is an internal war between what remains of the Rizzuto crime family or it's something guided or inspired from another criminal organization who tried to gain more power in Montreal", said Nicaso. Nicaso added external crime groups trying to expand their power include, organized crime in Ontario, the Hells Angels or other street gangs.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 11:15 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Seems to be a revenge killing that could be related back to Vito Rizzuto's return in 2012.


I think you're right. I also think that a lot of the murders during certain periods of the war are revenge killings. Which could mean more retaliatory attacks, a recent example of which might be the two attacks on Solid Gold, which was Moreno Gallo's old stomping grounds; other future retaliatory attacks, of course, would be more murders that have yet to be avenged. The guys in Montreal often seem ready to pull the trigger and to avenge murders relatively quickly or at least when the opportunity presents itself (which may mean a few years later).
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/16/16 11:28 PM

http://globalnews.ca/news/3006159/suspected-mafioso-vincenzo-spagnolo-gunned-down-in-laval/

http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/former-rizzut...mp;_gsc=82uTk6f

Here more news articles.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 12:50 AM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
Mob expert Antonio Nicaso told CJAD News one thing's not clear.
"If this is an internal war between what remains of the Rizzuto crime family or it's something guided or inspired from another criminal organization who tried to gain more power in Montreal", said Nicaso. Nicaso added external crime groups trying to expand their power include, organized crime in Ontario, the Hells Angels or other street gangs.


The fall of the Rizzuto dynasty, or le clan sicilien, was first mentioned in newspaper articles in early 2010, correct? And is now being written about again in the media. But the attacks on members of the Montreal Mafia hierarchy over the years of the most recent war have claimed victims who were non-Sicilians in the group, i.e., Rocco Sollecito (the leader of the so-called "Sicilian clan"?!) and Lorenzo Giordano. And many of us have speculated since 2010 or 2011 that Francesco Arcadi (Calabrian) has had a target on his back all these years because of, among other possible reasons, his very important position in the Rizzuto organization. Sollecito and Arcadi had important connections in Italy, and one wonders whether Sollecito's died with him and whether Arcadi's are crucially relevant to a possible ascension to power once he's out of prison for good. (Daniel Renaud considers Stefano Sollecito to be officially, on paper, the current leader of the Montreal Mafia; I will write something about Stefano soon in the Rizzuto associate "Joe Bravo" resurfaces in Sicily thread.)

Keep in mind, as well, that the murder of Angelo D'Onofrio in early June of this year was considered a case of mistaken identity--the supposed target was Tony Vanelli, a stalwart in the old Cotroni-Violi group who, like many in this group, did not even have Calabrian ancestry. So then the media speculation was that anyone considered part of the old guard was being targeted by the new guard.

The leader in Montreal of the so-called "Calabrian faction," or le clan calabrais, is the French-Canadian Raynald Desjardins (who, in my opinion, still wields a lot of influence from prison).

After Paolo Violi was murdered in January 1978, the FBI identified Joe Di Maulo one to six months after Violi's death as the acting leader of the Montreal Mafia. Di Maulo's ancestry was from Campobasso in Molise, not from Calabria. So if the FBI intelligence was correct, there is a precedent that an acting leader of the Montreal Mafia has been neither Sicilian nor Calabrian for at least just a short period of time. If an individual does emerge after the current mob war as someone who will be recognized universally or by most as the Montreal godfather, he need not have Sicilian or Calabrian ancestry; I wouldn't be surprised if this person has ancestry from another region in Italy. But I doubt this will be someone from outside of Montreal.

Canada's three largest commercial marine ports are to be found in Montreal, Halifax, and Vancouver--it is the last that is the principal marine gateway into Canada, not Montreal. Although the Port of Montreal is still strategically important for Canadian organized-crime groups involved in drug trafficking, it isn't the only Canadian port used by such groups. Over the decades, the Rizzuto organization, for example, has used the Port of Halifax. The Siderno Group in the Greater Toronto Area does not need "control" of the Port of Montreal.

Some current newspaper stories about what the killing of the recently murdered Vincenzo Spagnolo means are citing Mafia inc. co-author André Cédilot's theory that the "Calabrian faction" in Montreal, along with influence from the Ontario 'ndrangheta and the Hells Angels, is behind the current mayhem. But Cédilot and his co-author are the ones who misidentified the ancestry of a number of important Montreal Mafia figures and other criminals in their 2010 book; the authors also made other significant errors that, to me, reveal a lack of understanding of the history and relationship between the Italian underworlds of Toronto and Montreal. One retired Sûreté du Québec (SQ) officer, John Galianos, is quoted in a recent article about Spagnolo's murder as follows: "It could be some of the younger guys or from the opposing group in Toronto who is trying to take over, the Paolo Violi group,” Galianos said. “His sons are in Ontario and taking care of things there, there is some sort of revenge going on.” The problem is, there is no Paolo Violi group in Toronto. The Luppino-Violi group in Hamilton is assumed to be a 'ndrina--and that's my take on it too after all these years--although it's worth noting that, significantly, Giacomo Luppino was caught saying in a bugged conversation that there are no mafia indoctrination rites or ceremonies (he was laughing at a TV portrayal of such rites).

What is laughable is that the theory of a takeover of the Montreal Mafia by Calabrian crime groups in Ontario has been strongest when Vito Rizzuto was imprisoned and after his death. So when he was alive and out of prison, the whole of the Canadian 'ndrangheta, it seems, was unable to make good on its mission to take over Montreal. Does that say something about the power of the Greater Toronto Area Siderno Group?

I am very intrigued about which individuals or groups could be behind the high-profile murders of Sollecito and Giordano because, insofar as the two killings are related--I think those two were targeted because they were on the same side but I can't be sure--the possible suggestion is that the individuals or groups behind the murders are far more powerful than Sollecito and Giordano ever were. But of course this isn't the only possibility--maybe a smaller unknown faction is responsible; maybe what is left of a certain faction in the mob war is redoubling its efforts; maybe alliances are being forged between groups previously opposed to each other. Time will tell.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 01:14 AM

My last piece on this. Its all fucked up there fighting over greed. Theres nothing orgnized in montreal anymore. Maybe the bikers but the lcn american style is done. There just like the cartel in mexico killing over turf and shipments spots. Theres no joey merlino type guy up there recruiting young guys to prick there finger and say the magic oath. Even the guy sal the iron worker who probaly thought thts what he was going to do gun smoke buy abunch or drugs guys. And died in a river. Im not saying them other 2 mafia groups from italy are not there but the john gotti burn a saint in your hand thing is probaly a thing of the past died with rizzuto. After vito seen his father dead and sons whacked he probaly had no faith in la cosa nostra. He even hit his friend in the driveway di maulo. Thats a nono.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 01:16 AM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Seems to be a revenge killing that could be related back to Vito Rizzuto's return in 2012.


I think you're right. I also think that a lot of the murders during certain periods of the war are revenge killings. Which could mean more retaliatory attacks, a recent example of which might be the two attacks on Solid Gold, which was Moreno Gallo's old stomping grounds; other future retaliatory attacks, of course, would be more murders that have yet to be avenged.


Are you suggesting that the attacks on Solid Gold were retaliatory attacks by the old Rizzuto group for recent murders or do I misinterpret?

It seems like we have as much clue on who's behind this as we did in 2010. Apparantly people are bringing up old theories like Paolo Violi's sons trying to take over, which I'm extremely sceptic about. I think a more viable theory is that Arcadi is making a powerplay with backing from Ontario. A more frightning theory is that Giordano, Arcadi and Sollecito were on the same side and are being killed off by another group. It feels too convenient thinking about people loyal to Desjardins and De Vito. It also seems like the old Di Maulo-Cotroni group is still on good terms with the 'Sicillians' because Carmine Vanelli was seen at Sollecito's funeral, but that may not mean much.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 01:23 AM

I would definitely thing the violi family kids who watched there father get sniper killed at the dinner table are suspects in nicolo rizutto death its like the same exact shit 30yrs later and what a sweet revenge. But it probaly to throw the target at them also smart
Posted By: Giacomo_Vacari

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 07:11 AM

Frank Arcadi is the boss. Frank Cotroni Jr, and Leonard Rizzuto both called peace.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 07:31 AM

@ anti mafia

Great post, I have a couple of questions.....



You mention the different ports. The way I see it, the Montreal port was valuable when the primary destination for drugs was New York. Also, the original source was the French Connection, and Montreal does have the French component. When it became a Sicilian connection, and then later, Thai and Chinese, and Irish, and South American, this component was probably less important. When they kinda severed ties with NY, and it became about moving the drugs IN Canada and Europe, then it was only important to get the drugs INTO Canada. Might this explain why as time went on the Rizzuto clan and other crime groups use the other ports more?


On all the killings: I said before, I thought that the " Made" guys are the blood relatives, marriage alliances. Could there be a purging of the BLOOD RELATIVES more so than say, based on ethnic lines like Sicilian or Calabrian? Also' what do think about the possibility that we are seeing the different factions, ( I see you actually already kinda mentioned this as a possibility, just noticed..) switching sides back and forth? A lot of these murders seem like these guys are set up by people very close to them, the hits are TOO CLEAN.


The point you made about the Ndrangheta not making a move on Vito while he was alive, and what it says about their power? I think it says more about Vito's power to procure narcotics more than anything. He was TOO valuable to hit when he was alive, because he made too many people too much money. His connects were too solid, to the Big Circle Boys for heroin, the West End was it for Hashish? Like he was just as big in Hash as he was coke. He had his connections in Sicily, working with the Calabrians to try to build that bridge. He was TRUSTED, by the narcotics suppliers, I think his array of connects had even surpassed his fathers at that point. And he had TOO much clout with the guys moving the stuff on the street. Like take Arcadi? I don't even think guys like him would EVER deal with the street gangs and such, Vito was much more cosmopolitan, much more " Luciano-ish" for lack of a better adjective.
Edit; Were Rizzutos hash connections through Dejardins? He seemed to have some connects of his own, and connects to the Halifax port? Maybe that's why he still exercises power up there...and why he thought he could challenge the leadership..

The first point of control is the SOURCE of narcotics.
( Here is a historical parallel, I'll use gambling. In the 40s, if LCN wanted to control all the horse betting, they woulda had to have guys physically present at every track in the country, which is logistically a nightmare right? Okay apply this logic to drug corners, bars and clubs.

What was their solution, control the SOURCE of information, and thus you control all the bookies taking bets at the tracks. Now, think about it, they didn't send a massive crew to do this, they sent like Bugsy Siegal, maybe a few guys in a few key cities. Now apply this logic to narcotics and you see how the power is wielded...)

This brings me to my third question, but first consider this......
From this article...
Fly-wheel of the Drug Trade. https://www.tni.org/en/paper/rothschilds-mafia-aruba



The [BadWord]-Caruana clan has had some serious set-backs with the arrest and conviction of some of their most prominent bosses in 1996. Does this mean the clan is out of business? Prosecutor Natoli is under no illusions that the conviction of the [BadWord] brothers will mean the end of the clan's criminal activities and contends that the brothers are able to continue to organize drug transports from jail. [BadWord] and Caruana are not the kind of traffickers who smuggle the merchandise themselves, he explains: "They give the orders, they pull the strings." The highest levels of the drug trade use steady channels: solid systems of transport and tested money-laundering routes, Natoli adds. Several leading members of the clan – such as the [BadWord] sons, all called Giuseppe – remain outside prison and dozens of lower ranking foot-soldiers are still available. (82)

Natoli's fear that the clan continues to play a major role in the drug trade even though the principal leaders are in prison, proved to be correct. During the trial in Palermo, one of the defendants, the fugitive Alfonso Caruana, turned out to be the central organizer of a network that smuggled eleven metric tons of cocaine to Italy from 1991-94. The ring was dismantled in March 1995 in Northern Italy.

Caruana brought together the cocaine producers of the Colombian Cartels with the Italian distributors, six 'ndrangheta families the Calabrian variant of the Mafia. Once again the [BadWord]-Caruana family was "the fly-wheel of the drug trade and the indispensable link between suppliers and distributors." (83)

What I noticed is that the Caruanas and [BadWord] were securing coke for the whole of Cosa Nostra, as well as the Siderno group.


How important are the Caruana-[BadWord] in all of this? They run the Venuzelan family right? ( Apparently there are like HUNDREDS of wholesalers operating there..)And we know they had tremendous influence in the Antilles. And then I see reports of Avanlanches of coke coming through the Dutch ports. Who is organizing all that coke?

It seems their narcotics business got so large it outgrew being simply a Sicilian business. These guys are TOO globalized it seems. Dealing with Sicilians only, means you only control NY. Dealing with Calabrians means you control, Canada, and Europe, AND Australia. And they can STILL cut deals with whoever is left of the Sicilian, or Montreal, or what ever lines they are distinguished by be it geography or ethnicity. I know people think of the Rizzutos as a Bonnano subsidiary. But I gotta ask, were they actually a subsidiary of the Caruana- [BadWord] family, that was simply overtaken by the wider influence of Ndrangheta? And then the Caruanas made deals with Ndrangheta and the remnants of the Rizzuto group?

I appreciate any thoughts from everyone....
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 07:38 AM

Also, even though it's the wrong thread, I see these guys organized like this....



Crime Corporation- Shareholders= Blood Relatives

This company never goes "Public" so to speak, and you can't buy shares really.


Edit: You can acquire shares, but only if you control a large apparatus for distribution, (it's more like a contract between a supplier and retailer though, like a mattress manufacturer agreeing to supply Sears...) But sometimes the company fully integrates and develops their own, think LCN importing zips for their own distribution. Control a reliable method for transportation and or importation, (Again, this is more like a contract between companies. Sometimes a company will fully integrate and just develop their own, like Amazon getting their own trucks instead of hiring UPS. Think Cosa Nostra using the Teamsters to truck dope in the 40s -50s. Have an additional source for supply, (although this will most times put you in direct competition) or be able to launder all the money.
But you can do a " Hostile" takeover lol


Crime Ceo= Street Boss

Crime COO= Underboss

Crime VPs = Lieutenants

Assassins are a lot like lawyers, kept on retainer, but loyal to a dollar.

Everyone else is an employee. And replaceble, indeed even the CEOs and COOs are replaceable. The only ones who aren't, are the blood relatives, which is why they all gotta die....in a hostile crime corporate take over....

Maybe I think too much lol, any thoughts?
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 07:49 AM

Who is Leonard Rizzuto?
Posted By: Giacomo_Vacari

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 08:50 AM

Leonardo Rizzuto, son of Vito Rizzuto.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 09:37 AM

Good post antimafia, with this murder I think we also have to look at Sicily.
Posted By: GangstersInc

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 12:46 PM

Montreal mobster murdered at home as Mafia violence continues
http://gangstersinc.ning.com/profiles/blogs/montreal-mobster-murdered-at-home-as-violence-continues
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 04:26 PM

I'm still thinking these killings are coming from the Desjardins side. I'm thinking Arcadi and the Sicilians are on the same side here. I think he knows that's his best chance of taking over again. After the conspiracy to kill Desjardins with Mom Boucher, I don't think the Hells have turned on them either. That is another reason Desjardins is having no problems pushing his trial back, he gets a day and a half per day served and he still has people killing for him. I have no doubt that he wields power still from prison. He proved that the first time he was locked up. Now it will be interesting to see if the HA and the Sicilians can get to him behind bars like they wanted to though. Surely the conspiracy pissed him off and at least killed a few in revenge or tried to anyways.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 04:58 PM

TVA Nouvelles in Quebec is reporting that a possible motive for Vincenzo Spagnolo's murder this past Saturday is that he was in possession of information that includes a list of individuals that Vito Rizzuto wanted killed. The article to which I've linked below is accompanied by a video in which crime reporter Félix Séguin elaborates about a Book of Truth that Spagnolo was in possession of--I'm still trying to figure out whether the book is meant literally or figuratively, as the article mentions that Spagnolo took certain secrets to his grave. In the interest of fairness, I should mention that Séguin has heard from sources that the Toronto-area 'ndrangheta (i.e., the Siderno Group) is possibly behind the murders of Rizzuto loyalists in the last little while; Seguin has expressed this theory on Twitter as well. I'm afraid I don't buy it.

I owe a few posters some replies--I'll try to answer in due course.

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/10/17/le-gardien-du-livre-des-grands-secrets-reduit-au-silence
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 05:27 PM

If he does have that list, I'm pretty sure he wasn't the only one. If Vito knew he was dying like has been reported, surely he knew if Leonardo would have taken a role in the family or not. Also he trusted the Sollecito's enough that they would have probably had the same info as Spagnolo. I think it's more likely he was killed because of who he was close to than a list.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 05:30 PM

Originally Posted By: Giacomo_Vacari
Frank Arcadi is the boss. Frank Cotroni Jr, and Leonard Rizzuto both called peace.


I call bullshit.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 07:43 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
I'm still thinking these killings are coming from the Desjardins side. I'm thinking Arcadi and the Sicilians are on the same side here. I think he knows that's his best chance of taking over again. After the conspiracy to kill Desjardins with Mom Boucher, I don't think the Hells have turned on them either. That is another reason Desjardins is having no problems pushing his trial back, he gets a day and a half per day served and he still has people killing for him. I have no doubt that he wields power still from prison. He proved that the first time he was locked up. Now it will be interesting to see if the HA and the Sicilians can get to him behind bars like they wanted to though. Surely the conspiracy pissed him off and at least killed a few in revenge or tried to anyways.


Desjardins was the true leader of the murderous rebellion against the Rizzuto clan, this is what the turncoat Giuseppe Carbone told a court in Palermo last week.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 07:45 PM

It is not the hit list that is the problem.I also agree that others must have that list. The problem is the secrets of the Mafia that is in that book. Further in the news article it mentions that those secrets could upset or unbalance the order of the Mafia. What is not said in the article, are those secrets local to the Montreal area or does it expose other people from Ontario,NY or abroad.
The next question I ask myself is why would anyone have that information in a book and for what purpose ?
Posted By: SonnyBlackstein

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 07:55 PM

Amazing to think in the past decade the Montreal mob war victims number in amount to the size of the Columbo family.

That gives size and scale to the conflict.
That one of the five families has (metaphorically) essentially been wiped out.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/17/16 10:11 PM

Originally Posted By: SonnyBlackstein
Amazing to think in the past decade the Montreal mob war victims number in amount to the size of the Columbo family.

That gives size and scale to the conflict.
That one of the five families has (metaphorically) essentially been wiped out.


Depends on the numbers you're speaking of. A recent article list 40 murders, but that same number was also brought up years earlier and so seems to be repeated and outdated. Also, while some of the killings are related many probably are not. Chaos started to erupt not long after Vito Rizzuto was incarcerated. People saw that as an opportunity to settle old scores.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/18/16 02:10 PM

Seems like a deja-vu doesn't it? A throwback to 2009 when the Rizzuto clan was under heavy attack.

Looking back, nobody knew what was going on. Who was killing such heavy hitters who seemed pretty much untouchable...Nick Jr, Nicolo, Paolo, Agostino and so forth....The media was using as they are today, the Calabrian clan, to describe the main rival faction. Years have passed and we now know that besides the Rizzuto top 6 leaders, Montreal had a rather large opposing group attacking the weakened Rizzuto clan which consisted of:

- Desjardins-Mirrarchi and friends
- Di Maulo-Cotroni group
- Arcuri-Montagna-Lopresti and co.
- De Vito and friends
- Other various groups, Scoppa, Gallo, Mucci..

Was the Ndrangheta involved? Maybe indirectly and on a support level basis. Many of the players above were documented as having visited leading figures in the Siderno group between 06-12'. But it may be possible that Montreal gangsters were reaching out to them vs the other way around.

I believe that the current situation in many ways replicates the early 80's when Vic Cotroni passed away. It was then that the Rizzuto family officially took over and prospered, even though the Violi brothers had already been wiped out. Whoever is trying to eliminate the old guard, has mainly done so because Vito passed away and what's left of his group no longer holds the same power.

Clearly local players are the main culprits here, Siderno boys will not be sending men here to pull the trigger but their involvement will be one of capital and logistics. Most likely, the current opposing faction is the remaining players of the former alliance that attempted to overthrow the Rizzuto family.

Time will tell.

**Disclaimer** to those who are not familiar with Quebec media and news, the Calabrian faction or Sicilian mafia are terms used by the media to describe opposing factions, similar to Bloods vs Crips. In reality, they are neither accurate since both groups have leaders or members from various parts of Italy. Traditionally the Sicilian faction is referred as the Rizzuto group, while the Calabrian faction is a mixture of the old Di-Maulo-Cotroni and others. Recently, some reporters are starting to make the distinction between the Calabrian faction in Montreal and the Siderno group.

The true Sicilian Cosa Nostra and Ndrangheta would almost never have a direct war, such things don't happen in Rome or Milan where both operate together. They are close and work together in Italy and Europe where they share and split territories accordingly to avoid conflict and all out bloodshed.

Typically the top leaders in each group will meet and discuss matters before wars breakout. Montreal's current situation seems messy but many decisions are taken both a local level and from abroad.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/18/16 02:47 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Seems like a deja-vu doesn't it?


That's the best way to describe it, lol. Just like back then we'll probably learn more about these new (or old?), emerging players a year from now when the air has cleared. The question is: will this story ever end? It's an ongoing cycle of killings and revenge killings and revenge killings of revenge killings and so on. The police are playing a decisive part in this as well, because after a major arrest the opposing group starts cleaning house. Good post.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/18/16 02:59 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: eurodave
Seems like a deja-vu doesn't it?


That's the best way to describe it, lol. Just like back then we'll probably learn more about these new (or old?), emerging players a year from now when the air has cleared. The question is: will this story ever end? It's an ongoing cycle of killings and revenge killings and revenge killings of revenge killings and so on. The police are playing a decisive part in this as well, because after a major arrest the opposing group starts cleaning house. Good post.


The Violi to Rizzuto transition took a few years I believe, between mid 70's to Cotroni's death in 83'. Because these situations are so complex and so many players are involved, both italian and non-italian, it takes time and strategy to implement a new order.

That being said, the Rizzuto clan is looking rather thin, in jail and weaker than ever. There is no more Vito. Maybe this time it will be a final extermination.

Like you said, the Police play a bigger role than most give credit. They knew all along that Desjardins was a huge factor in the rebellion as was Montagna. They followed them everywhere. By cleaning up the Rizzuto's again in 2015, they must of known that they pratically sealed their fate.

For some odd reason, I have a feeling the Scoppa brother's are making some moves. Rarely do you hear about them, but they wield a lot of power.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/18/16 03:08 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Seems to be a revenge killing that could be related back to Vito Rizzuto's return in 2012.


I think you're right. I also think that a lot of the murders during certain periods of the war are revenge killings. Which could mean more retaliatory attacks, a recent example of which might be the two attacks on Solid Gold, which was Moreno Gallo's old stomping grounds; other future retaliatory attacks, of course, would be more murders that have yet to be avenged.


Are you suggesting that the attacks on Solid Gold were retaliatory attacks by the old Rizzuto group for recent murders or do I misinterpret?

It seems like we have as much clue on who's behind this as we did in 2010. Apparantly people are bringing up old theories like Paolo Violi's sons trying to take over, which I'm extremely sceptic about. I think a more viable theory is that Arcadi is making a powerplay with backing from Ontario. A more frightning theory is that Giordano, Arcadi and Sollecito were on the same side and are being killed off by another group. It feels too convenient thinking about people loyal to Desjardins and De Vito. It also seems like the old Di Maulo-Cotroni group is still on good terms with the 'Sicillians' because Carmine Vanelli was seen at Sollecito's funeral, but that may not mean much.


Two pages back I posted a link to Daniel Renaud's October 4 article about the Solid Gold attacks. Here's the story link in case you haven't read the article:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-criminels.php

According to the article, a source revealed that after Gallo's murder, Solid Gold passed into Stefano Sollecito's hands. The article also mentions that this information has not been corroborated by police. If the source's information is accurate, maybe one or more people close to Gallo were behind the attacks for a number of reasons, e.g., anger over Gallo's murder, resentment arising from losing the establishment.

If the information isn't accurate, the attacks may have been committed by people who were upset with Gallo's having sided with Montagna.

Toward the end of the article is the suggestion that because of the Solid Gold attacks, law enforcement will be looking into whether and how the murders of Rocco Sollecito and Moreno Gallo are related.

You don't have to read the rest of my post because you will have previously read my thoughts on the 'ndrangheta operating in the Greater Toronto Area.

Below I've quoted from Nick Rose's July 27, 2015 article for VICE News, "With Sicilian Mafia in Rapid Decline, Just Who Is Running the Mob in Montreal?"

With the rise of Haitian street gangs, the imminent release of numerous Hells Angels from prison, and rival Italian factions, there is no shortage of conspiracy theories surrounding Vito Rizzuto's replacement. Chief among those theories is that the Ontario-based Calabrian mafia, also known as the 'Ndrangheta, is moving in and getting revenge after having been violently pushed out of the city by Vito's father in the 1970s.

But this line of thinking is deeply flawed, said RCMP Staff Sergeant Chris Knight, because it assumes that Vito Rizzuto can even be replaced.

"No one's got the credibility, no one's got the clout and certainly no one has the charisma that Vito Rizzuto had—and I've met him—to make allies out of enemies. No one has that right now," Knight told VICE.

Knight has been with the RCMP for 34 years and works with local, provincial and international law enforcement to monitor organized crime in Quebec. His squad has seen no sign of rival Italian gangs moving to replace the Rizzuto's, as certain media and observers have speculated.

"We haven't seen attempts or power moves from Hamilton or Toronto on establishments or persons here. And we haven't received any information on the street to that effect either. It's a myth. I've always heard these things about New York and Toronto controlling Montreal but nothing could be further from the truth."

Antonio Nicaso agrees. He has authored 27 books about organized crimes and acted as a consultant for the government on these matters. In his most recent book Business or Blood he writes extensively about the final years of Rizzuto's life and the implications of a post-Vito world.


I think most of us realize that law-enforcement officials, whether active or retired, have conflicting opinions about various facets of the Montreal mob war, e.g., the roots, the causes, the factions, the behind-the-scenes players, and so on. The same can be said about organized-crime authors and crime reporters, who when writing their books and articles about the Montreal Mafia are citing the aforementioned officials.

I can't and won't dismiss the very real possibility that, a number of years ago, there were individuals in the Siderno Group in the Greater Toronto Area--not just the leaders--who supported and actively contributed to a toppling of the Montreal Mafia hierarchy. But my opinion is that there wasn't unanimous agreement in the GTA Siderno Group about attempting a takeover, providing support to Vittorio Mirarchi (and others?), and severing ties with the Rizzuto organization (with Vito in particular); I am sure there were many other areas of disagreement. A divided GTA Siderno Group is not only plausible but also very likely, given the internal frictions since mid-2008 that have been documented by antindrangheta investigators in Calabria and law-enforcement officials in the GTA (and you might include here the high-profile murder of Carmine Verduci in April 2014 if you don't think it was an act of Vito's revenge). If you look at the fate of some of the seven leaders of the GTA Siderno Group since their names were revealed in the arrest warrants of the 2010 Operazione Il Crimine antindrangheta operation, you would be right to wonder whether there have been shifts in the balance of power in the camera di controllo of the GTA Siderno Group and who has replaced the more influential individuals not on the board, i.e., Carmelo Bruzzese and Verduci. The Project OPhoenix investigation that culminated in June of last year either reveals a reorganization in the GTA Siderno Group (Verduci and Pino Ursino were said to head their own groups) or muddies the waters. In any event, I think that there were leaders in the GTA Siderno Group who took a shot at trying to influence events in Montreal, ultimately failed, and then worried about getting clipped after Vito got out of prison and even after he died. If you believe the GTA Siderno Group took an active role in killing Paolo Renda, Agostino Cun-trera, and Nick Rizzuto Sr. for the purpose of taking over Montreal, you have to stop writing how low-profile the 'ndrangheta in the GTA is. Or that the GTA Siderno Group in Ontario is not prone to violence the way the Montreal Mafia is in Quebec.

Many people overestimate the power of the GTA Siderno Group here in Canada--and this comes from me, someone who has researched this group more than any other Canadian crime group--not understanding that this group has had to interact with American LCN and Sicilian CN groups in Canada and the US for approximately 60 years at this point. A good part of this interaction has involved respecting protocols and territories of operation; a good chunk of the interaction has been criminal collaboration. The GTA Siderno Group is not some exotic drug-trafficking criminal group. Some of its leaders have been engaged in loansharking for more than 40 years.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/18/16 03:17 PM

This is mostly accurate, but to undermine their influence is also naive. From various sources, we've seen major players in Montreal over the last few years take the 401 and visit local GTA gangsters.

De Vito did it, Piccirilli, Montagna, Mirarchi...etc...

Ironically you can't say Remo Commisso or Antonio Coluccio were seen multiple times hanging out in Montreal. It seems that Montreal mobsters were visiting Toronto. What for and why?

High profile murders usually require some sort of protocal and authorization. The GTA boys probably don't have a direct hand in what's going on, but as of late, with their own re-organization, I would assume they continue to play an external role which is not negligable.

That being said, made members of the Cosa Nostra and Ndrangheta divide territories and avoid conflict, both in the Americas and Europe.

You may believe that the Ndrine in Ontario are not significant, but on a global scale, the Sicilians buy coke from Calabrians, a reversal of what it was 20 years ago when they would go to people such as Caruana for large quantities. Various indictments and arrests have demonstrated how Cosa Nostra cells from different parts of Sicily, IE: Siragusa, Catania, Messina and Palermo are buying coke from Calabrian importers, mainly families from the Ionian side and the Gioia Tauro region.

If this happens in Italy and Europe, why can't this exact system replicate itself in Canada?
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/18/16 07:10 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
This is mostly accurate, but to undermine their influence is also naive. From various sources, we've seen major players in Montreal over the last few years take the 401 and visit local GTA gangsters.

De Vito did it, Piccirilli, Montagna, Mirarchi...etc...

Ironically you can't say Remo Commisso or Antonio Coluccio were seen multiple times hanging out in Montreal. It seems that Montreal mobsters were visiting Toronto. What for and why?

High profile murders usually require some sort of protocal and authorization. The GTA boys probably don't have a direct hand in what's going on, but as of late, with their own re-organization, I would assume they continue to play an external role which is not negligable.

That being said, made members of the Cosa Nostra and Ndrangheta divide territories and avoid conflict, both in the Americas and Europe.



Excellent posts Eurodave. Your views and assessment on your last three posts are very identical to mine.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/18/16 09:14 PM

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/streit-gang-sales-1.3804199

Interesting article, armoured cars sold to an associate of Rizzuto Family.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/18/16 10:20 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
For some odd reason, I have a feeling the Scoppa brother's are making some moves. Rarely do you hear about them, but they wield a lot of power.


Might be the case. Andrea Scoppa was said to be on good terms with Vito Rizzuto, but times have changed. They've been around for a long time and are very active in the drug trade and because of that they may be looking for a larger slize of the pie if not the whole pie itself. Interestingly, Andrea Scoppa was listed as one of the individuals Stefano Sollecito was not allowed to meet with during his parole.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/18/16 11:30 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Seems to be a revenge killing that could be related back to Vito Rizzuto's return in 2012.


I think you're right. I also think that a lot of the murders during certain periods of the war are revenge killings. Which could mean more retaliatory attacks, a recent example of which might be the two attacks on Solid Gold, which was Moreno Gallo's old stomping grounds; other future retaliatory attacks, of course, would be more murders that have yet to be avenged.


Are you suggesting that the attacks on Solid Gold were retaliatory attacks by the old Rizzuto group for recent murders or do I misinterpret?

It seems like we have as much clue on who's behind this as we did in 2010. Apparantly people are bringing up old theories like Paolo Violi's sons trying to take over, which I'm extremely sceptic about. I think a more viable theory is that Arcadi is making a powerplay with backing from Ontario. A more frightning theory is that Giordano, Arcadi and Sollecito were on the same side and are being killed off by another group. It feels too convenient thinking about people loyal to Desjardins and De Vito. It also seems like the old Di Maulo-Cotroni group is still on good terms with the 'Sicillians' because Carmine Vanelli was seen at Sollecito's funeral, but that may not mean much.


Two pages back I posted a link to Daniel Renaud's October 4 article about the Solid Gold attacks. Here's the story link in case you haven't read the article:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-criminels.php

According to the article, a source revealed that after Gallo's murder, Solid Gold passed into Stefano Sollecito's hands. The article also mentions that this information has not been corroborated by police. If the source's information is accurate, maybe one or more people close to Gallo were behind the attacks for a number of reasons, e.g., anger over Gallo's murder, resentment arising from losing the establishment.

If the information isn't accurate, the attacks may have been committed by people who were upset with Gallo's having sided with Montagna.

Toward the end of the article is the suggestion that because of the Solid Gold attacks, law enforcement will be looking into whether and how the murders of Rocco Sollecito and Moreno Gallo are related.


Yeah, I read that article (I rarely miss any) but I forgot about it stating that it had transitioned to Sollecito. It seems to me that Rocco Sollecito's murder could rather be linked to Giordano than Gallo, but who knows. Gallo had a small army of his own I believe. I still wonder where Mucci stood in all of this. Based on tapes of the Consenza club it looked like that Mucci was with Gallo back then. But based on information from Renaud, Mucci had supposedly distanced himself from Gallo during the take-over attempt because he chose to be neutral. Do you happen to have more information of Mucci's relationship with Gallo? I know that Mucci was in charge of a crew who where distributing coke, but I think that he was Gallo's second-in-command. Also, I ignored your advice and read your post in its entirety. wink
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/19/16 02:09 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/streit-gang-sales-1.3804199

Interesting article, armoured cars sold to an associate of Rizzuto Family.


Tony Mucci has been in armored vehicles for a while now, at least ever since Vito got out he was.
Posted By: baldo

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/19/16 03:22 PM

Just to check....after 14 pages were still have no idea what's going on up there? :-)
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/19/16 03:55 PM

Originally Posted By: baldo
Just to check....after 14 pages were still have no idea what's going on up there? :-)


On the old Real Deal forum we still had no clue after 25 pages of the 'Nicolo Rizzuto has been shot' thread. shhh
Posted By: Blackjack2121

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/19/16 04:11 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: baldo
Just to check....after 14 pages were still have no idea what's going on up there? :-)


On the old Real Deal forum we still had no clue after 25 pages of the 'Nicolo Rizzuto has been shot' thread. shhh


what happened to it?

it was still active and then a board error 2 months ago and counting just never got fixed?
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/19/16 04:41 PM

Originally Posted By: Blackjack2121
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: baldo
Just to check....after 14 pages were still have no idea what's going on up there? :-)


On the old Real Deal forum we still had no clue after 25 pages of the 'Nicolo Rizzuto has been shot' thread. shhh


what happened to it?

it was still active and then a board error 2 months ago and counting just never got fixed?


It seems like the owner has pulled out the plug.
Posted By: IvyLeague

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/19/16 06:19 PM

Originally Posted By: Blackjack2121
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: baldo
Just to check....after 14 pages were still have no idea what's going on up there? :-)


On the old Real Deal forum we still had no clue after 25 pages of the 'Nicolo Rizzuto has been shot' thread. shhh


what happened to it?

it was still active and then a board error 2 months ago and counting just never got fixed?


That's a long story but, in a nutshell, the administrator and moderator over there gave the boot to too many of their most consistent and long-term posters. Slowly the RD forum became a ghost town with only a few posters checking in regularly. Last I saw, a different format of the board can still be accessed elsewhere but it's still basically dead. And the powers that be there have themselves to thank for it.
Posted By: Giacomo_Vacari

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/19/16 06:32 PM

Power trip over there at the realdeal, too many a knowledgeable people were booted for not following the party line, plus "a few people" brought legal action against the site for discrimination (LE members) or so the rumor is. Those folks that were in power over there, some of them are across the street now, have been for over a year or so.
Posted By: Chicken713

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/19/16 07:21 PM

That sucks it went down. Right when I got vouched for and allowed into the forum it went down basically. Like the next day. I never got the RealDeal experience lol
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/19/16 08:36 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/streit-gang-sales-1.3804199

Interesting article, armoured cars sold to an associate of Rizzuto Family.


Tony Mucci has been in armored vehicles for a while now, at least ever since Vito got out he was.


Yes, the article makes reference to 2006 when a Rizzuto associate bought them. Mucci most probably got from the same company.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/19/16 09:01 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: baldo
Just to check....after 14 pages were still have no idea what's going on up there? :-)


On the old Real Deal forum we still had no clue after 25 pages of the 'Nicolo Rizzuto has been shot' thread. shhh


I agree the old existing OC family has split up in various factions, all fighting for dominance and with all the betrayals it is very difficult to know who is on what side. At one point the Rizzuto rivals were ahead then then Rizzuto made a comeback; now the rivals have the upper hand for now. It remains to be seen if the Rizzuto's will survive this second round of attacks.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/19/16 10:02 PM

Salvatore Cazzetta remains detained

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...78_section_POS1
Posted By: Blackjack2121

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/19/16 10:31 PM

Originally Posted By: IvyLeague
Originally Posted By: Blackjack2121
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: baldo
Just to check....after 14 pages were still have no idea what's going on up there? :-)


On the old Real Deal forum we still had no clue after 25 pages of the 'Nicolo Rizzuto has been shot' thread. shhh


what happened to it?

it was still active and then a board error 2 months ago and counting just never got fixed?


That's a long story but, in a nutshell, the administrator and moderator over there gave the boot to too many of their most consistent and long-term posters. Slowly the RD forum became a ghost town with only a few posters checking in regularly. Last I saw, a different format of the board can still be accessed elsewhere but it's still basically dead. And the powers that be there have themselves to thank for it.


Nah I know what happened with people getting banned...

I was still posting right up until the end

there was no announcement or anything...there was just a board error and it never got fixed and i guess they just gave up on it

it happened about 2 months before this last time too, it was down for like 2 weeks, but then it got fixed....then out of nowhere the same thing happened.

people were still posting in the days leading up to the board error

weird
Posted By: dsbaloo

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/20/16 04:45 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/streit-gang-sales-1.3804199

Interesting article, armoured cars sold to an associate of Rizzuto Family.


Remember hearing when rizzuto got out he purchased like a fully armored s500 Mercedes or something . Smart move I would do the same thing. It's so wild up there if I was in the mix I would have an armored car and I wouldn't leave the house without a vest and a pistol close by... I know magi also had a armoured car and seemed to always be wearing a vest when he went anywhere .. and also had a fucking convoy of security...

Vests are easy to get and inexpensive.. and not that uncomfortable to wear under your clothes if your life is really on the line. Yeah it's not going to do shit off you catch a head shot or get hit with like a 762 round (some vests will) but still better than nothing
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/20/16 04:56 AM

I alluded to the Scoppa thing months ago.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 12:04 AM

Originally Posted By: dsbaloo
Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/streit-gang-sales-1.3804199

Interesting article, armoured cars sold to an associate of Rizzuto Family.


Remember hearing when rizzuto got out he purchased like a fully armored s500 Mercedes or something . Smart move I would do the same thing. It's so wild up there if I was in the mix I would have an armored car and I wouldn't leave the house without a vest and a pistol close by... I know magi also had a armoured car and seemed to always be wearing a vest when he went anywhere .. and also had a fucking convoy of security...

Vests are easy to get and inexpensive.. and not that uncomfortable to wear under your clothes if your life is really on the line. Yeah it's not going to do shit off you catch a head shot or get hit with like a 762 round (some vests will) but still better than nothing


That's who I meant in my post. Not sure why I typed Mucci, but I was thinking Magi. I know they had a story when his "convoy" was rolling and some guy jumped out of the woods with a rifle in his hands and jumped back in the woods and took off. I'm sure it was a sign that he was still being hunted. I have no doubt he still had something to do with Nick Jr's death. I would guarantee if there is a hit list his name is one of the ones still on it.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 10:33 AM

The Magi brothers have probably still ties to the people around Desjardins.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 10:59 AM

I gotta confirm, Sinatra Club called that Scoppa thing forever ago, before it came out in the papers, I was quite impressed frankly lol
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 11:00 AM

@ Sinatra
Are those guys still based in Mexico, as far you know?
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 11:02 AM

Rizzuto coming back was like Savastano on the TV show..


In fact, the whole war up there is probably being fought in a similar fashion.

It's no wonder we can't get a full grasp on it, I doubt the participants have a full grasp on it...
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 12:18 PM

Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I gotta confirm, Sinatra Club called that Scoppa thing forever ago, before it came out in the papers, I was quite impressed frankly lol


Nothing has come out in the papers about the Scoppa brothers yet. It's only speculation.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 12:50 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I gotta confirm, Sinatra Club called that Scoppa thing forever ago, before it came out in the papers, I was quite impressed frankly lol


Nothing has come out in the papers about the Scoppa brothers yet. It's only speculation.


I think eurodave was the first who said they had a big influence.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 04:59 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I gotta confirm, Sinatra Club called that Scoppa thing forever ago, before it came out in the papers, I was quite impressed frankly lol


Nothing has come out in the papers about the Scoppa brothers yet. It's only speculation.


I think eurodave was the first who said they had a big influence.


I had head of their name and influence in the early 2000's and obviously, they are a force to be recknoned with. Just to inform those of you who that are not familiar with the city, the Scoppa's operated mainly on Gallo's old turf, basically Little Italy and the center of the city. I'm not quite sure what relationship they had though.

I've also come across an interesting article in Italian about certain facts.

"
Out of the game the managers of Alvaro, New York if they are taken the Ursino. Including contacts with the South Americans. The earthquakes are reflected in Canada, where the hierarchies crumble. And with them the pax mafia. The 80 criminals Italian emigrants there had divided the business between Toronto and Montreal. Sicilians to the Rizzuto clan drugs; the Calabrian arrived from Siderno, gambling, gambling and usury. Map designed it in 2010 Italians investigators who worked on the "Crime" maxi investigation, which for the first time identified the leaders of the 'Ndrangheta and is still valid. Three years ago, the leader of the Rizzuto, Vito, is dying of cancer. In the following months, coinciding with the rise of the Ursino in the North American dial, four of the six members of the "Council" of the Rizzuto clan are killed. The last to fall was Rocco Sollecito. A few weeks ago, in Montreal, he was about to end in a coffin Marco Pizzi, 46, cocaine importer for Rizzuto, escaped the ambush of the hitmen who had buffered and flanked with a car. They were masked and armed. "The Calabrian attacked the old" powers.

http://www.grandangoloagrigento.it/la-gu...-dei-calabresi/
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 08:37 PM

The only way Toronto can influence things in Montreal if there's indeed the alliance between the 'calabrian faction' of the Rizzuto clan and the 'Ndrangheta in Ontario maybe backed by the Hells Angels.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 08:45 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I gotta confirm, Sinatra Club called that Scoppa thing forever ago, before it came out in the papers, I was quite impressed frankly lol


Nothing has come out in the papers about the Scoppa brothers yet. It's only speculation.


http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-policiers.php

For the record the Scoppa's were mentioned in various articles dating back over a decade. The one I posted above dates Oct. 14 2014. Daniel Renaud has been writing about them for years. This pre-dates claims by a certain individual on these posts, that said he called it months ago.
Eurodave is correct he was an associate of Gallo at one time, they do carry weight. They were neutral at first when the war began but now considered rivals.
They are Calabrian. Some of his associates were/are DeVito (Calabrian), Piccirilli(Calabrian),Mirarchi(Calabrian).They all have close ties with the bikers MC (Cazzetta). Most of them made trips to Ontario. If you connect the dots you get the big picture.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 09:00 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I gotta confirm, Sinatra Club called that Scoppa thing forever ago, before it came out in the papers, I was quite impressed frankly lol


Nothing has come out in the papers about the Scoppa brothers yet. It's only speculation.


http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-policiers.php

For the record the Scoppa's were mentioned in various articles dating back over a decade. The one I posted above dates Oct. 14 2014. Daniel Renaud has been writing about them for years. This pre-dates claims by a certain individual on these posts, that said he called it months ago.
Eurodave is correct he was an associate of Gallo at one time, they do carry weight. They were neutral at first when the war began but now considered rivals.
They are Calabrian. Some of his associates were/are DeVito (Calabrian), Piccirilli(Calabrian),Mirarchi(Calabrian).They all have close ties with the bikers MC (Cazzetta). Most of them made trips to Ontario. If you connect the dots you get the big picture.


I was talking about the Scoppas being pinpointed by journalists as those suspected of being behind the recent turmoil. I'm aware of them being mentioned in older articles. Could you post the article that has identified them as rivals of the Rizzuto faction? I must've missed it.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 09:13 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
The only way Toronto can influence things in Montreal if there's is indeed the alliance between the 'calabrian faction' of the Rizzuto clan and the 'Ndrangheta in Ontario maybe backed by the Hells Angels.


It is of my opinion that the pie is already divided in Montreal but the war is not over yet. The days of one family having it all is over. That is why we are seeing this conflict being carried out for years.It would be wise to share but some are too stubborn to understand.
If it is true that Ontario Calabrian clans are behind all this then you will have some of these clans or ndrine establish themselves in Montreal. That is a pattern of how they operate in other countries or cities. According to past news articles the Caruana/[BadWord] clan seem to have a good working relationship with the Calabrian clans in Ontario. If hostilities end in Montreal you may have the same relationship taking place in Montreal.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 09:19 PM

I missed that in all the chaos, but last month they throwed molotov cocktails at John & Dino, a company that used to be owned by Agostino Cun trera, who was gunned down in front of the very same company in 2010.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 09:44 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I gotta confirm, Sinatra Club called that Scoppa thing forever ago, before it came out in the papers, I was quite impressed frankly lol


Nothing has come out in the papers about the Scoppa brothers yet. It's only speculation.


http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-policiers.php

For the record the Scoppa's were mentioned in various articles dating back over a decade. The one I posted above dates Oct. 14 2014. Daniel Renaud has been writing about them for years. This pre-dates claims by a certain individual on these posts, that said he called it months ago.
Eurodave is correct he was an associate of Gallo at one time, they do carry weight. They were neutral at first when the war began but now considered rivals.
They are Calabrian. Some of his associates were/are DeVito (Calabrian), Piccirilli(Calabrian),Mirarchi(Calabrian).They all have close ties with the bikers MC (Cazzetta). Most of them made trips to Ontario. If you connect the dots you get the big picture.


I was talking about the Scoppas being pinpointed by journalists as those suspected of being behind the recent turmoil. I'm aware of them being mentioned in older articles. Could you post the article that has identified them as rivals of the Rizzuto faction? I must've missed it.


http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/10/08/un-mafioso-montrealais-doit-se-cacher-dans-le-sud

Here is one. In summary they mention he pissed off some street gang, west end gang and that he does not hesitate to give direct hits to the interim mafia led by Stefano.There was a price on his head, so he went to Mexico to give himself time to re-group etc....
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 10:45 PM

Thanks to the writer Pierre de Champlain for this link.

MONTREAL MAFIA: AN ALLIANCE TO SUCCEED THE SICILIAN
magictr | May 30, 2016 | News | No Comments


The murder Friday in Laval Rocco Sollecito, last faithful of Vito Rizzuto and ultimate representative of the heyday of the Sicilian Clan, announces a change of guard next and training of a new alliance to lead the mafia and bring peace after 10 years of bloody infighting. Here, according to our sources and observations, a list of individuals who could be part of the alliance, in the short or medium term, and to succeed Rizzuto head of the Montreal Mafia.

Vittorio Mirarchi

38 years old

Protected from the boss Raynald Desjardins, the ambitious young mafioso was arrested along with his mentor and more individuals of his bodyguards in December 2011 for the murder of aspiring godfather Salvatore Montagna, Charlemagne committed to a month earlier. He pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of conspiracy in March and his sentence will be known soon. Although Mirarchi risk of being sent to prison for an indefinite period, our sources believe that one should not exclude it from the equation and could be expected to play an important role someday. Mirarchi, which is associated with the Calabrian mafia cell of Montreal, enjoys strong support in Ontario.

Raynald Desjardins

62 years

While we did not give expensive of his skin there only a year and would have even been the subject of a murder plot by former soldier of the Hells Angels Maurice Boucher, it seems that the guy has taken the bull by the horns in recent months and that its influence is still real. Desjardins still has a team on the ground to defend its interests. However, it may spend several years in prison, who soon know his sentence after pleading guilty in July 2015 of conspiracy to murder of Salvatore Montagna. Desjardins is one of the clan leaders who tried to overthrow the Rizzuto in 2009-2010, according to police.

Andrea Scoppa

52 years

The name of this mysterious chieftain described as very intelligent resonates in the streets of Montreal for decades, but especially in recent years. Already active in the heroin trade, which would have allowed him to his place, Andrea Scoppa, aka Andrew, behind an elusive reputation, who has almost as unique criminal history sentenced to six years in prison in 2004 for a case of importing cocaine via the United States. Influential, Scoppa not like being in the spotlight; it would be surprising that a seat at the table is interested in, but it could hold the balance of power. It is also very close to the riders, the best allies for the Mafia today.

Salvatore Scoppa

46 years

Brother Andrew Scoppa would also be involved in heroin. His name is particularly out of the mouth of a police witness in the investigation of release of a university student, alleged seller of heroin, arrested by the Police Department of the City of Montreal (SPVM) the last fall. Over the past year, Salvatore Scoppa rose through the ranks within the Montreal Mafia and is one of the new strong men of the district Rivière-des-Prairies, an area at the center of many conflicts in recent times. Scoppa seems however to have regular contracts on his head, which encouraged him to move away from the city temporarily. His older brother and he would also links with influential individuals of organized crime called “Middle East”.

Antonio Mucci

61 years

The former soldier clan Violi during the 70s seems to have seven lives. Reportedly, the clan leader always associated to the Calabrian faction of the Montreal Mafia has rebounded in recent months, he has regularly been on the ropes during the years of infighting. There is a year and a half, a charge of possession of weapon was withdrawn against Mucci while his lawyer sought to testify investigator SPVM who had arrested the retired Paul Philippe. In 1973, when he was 18, Mucci had shot the journalist Jean-Pierre Charbonneau in full newsroom Devoir and was sentenced to eight years in prison.

Liborio [BadWord]

47 years

Liborio [BadWord], aka Poncho, faces cocaine trafficking charges after being arrested with other individuals in the last part of the RCMP investigation Clemenza there three weeks. According to our sources, he is part of the table towards the mafia set up after the natural death of the godfather Vito Rizzuto, in December 2013. [BadWord], that could represent the interests of the Sicilian branch to a possible new table is the son of Agostino [BadWord], nicknamed the Lord of Saint-Leonard, a man of honor mafia murdered in June 2010. [BadWord] is reputed to be very discreet, but his name had been mentioned in the investigation of organized crime Division of the SPVM Alkali to solve a series of arsons committed in cafés in 2010.

Vito Salvaggio

41 years

Vito Salvaggio, once very close to Nick Rizzuto Jr., the eldest son of Vito Rizzuto assassinated in December 2009, have also served on the mafia management table set up after the death of the sponsor in December 2013. It could have its up to a possible new table to represent the interests of the Sicilian branch of the Montreal mafia. Salvaggio is linked to Dilallo restaurant of Jean-Talon, target of a Molotov cocktail on December 10. Spring 2001 During the investigation, police had seen particular visit to the famous cache of money bikers Beaubien Street. He was arrested as part of this investigation, accused of conspiracy and drug trafficking and sentenced to four years in prison.

Gianpietro Tiberio

43 years

Little known, Tiberio, owner of a towing company, is considered by the police as a rising star of the Mafia. In April, his name was mentioned in an article in La Presse on a towing company to questionable practices. According to a joint investigation by CBC and the Globe and Mail, he was involved in the casino Dream, the Dominican Republic, the deceased godfather Vito Rizzuto allegedly tried to take control. Tiberio, aka JP, is a former soldier of the Rizzuto clan and was close to Domenico Macri, killed in August 2006. He has links with influential bikers. He was sentenced to three years in prison for a drug import conspiracy case from 2006. He denies having links with the Mafia.

Alessandro Sucapane

51

Sucapane purge since January 2015 a 10-year sentence for cocaine trafficking and gangsterism following his arrest in the second part of the Clemenza RCMP investigation in 2014. It certainly remain detained for a few years, but our sources believe that we should not set aside the influence it could have. Sucapane is the former partner of the dreaded chieftain Giuseppe De Vito, poisoned with cyanide in his cell at the Donnacona Penitentiary, in summer 2013, and was very active in the attempted coup against the Rizzuto clan in 2009- 2010. Even deprived of its leaders, the group Sucapane allied clans and Desjardins Mirarchi, would still have soldiers on the ground.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/21/16 10:55 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/10/08/un-mafioso-montrealais-doit-se-cacher-dans-le-sud

Here is one. In summary they mention he pissed off some street gang, west end gang and that he does not hesitate to give direct hits to the interim mafia led by Stefano.There was a price on his head, so he went to Mexico to give himself time to re-group etc....



That article is about Salvatore Scoppa and it's not clear who wanted him dead. Andrea Scoppa was on good terms with the Rizzutos, but that may have changed. However, brothers don't have to be on the same page. A good example were the Ciancaglinis from Philly.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/22/16 12:01 AM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/10/08/un-mafioso-montrealais-doit-se-cacher-dans-le-sud

Here is one. In summary they mention he pissed off some street gang, west end gang and that he does not hesitate to give direct hits to the interim mafia led by Stefano.There was a price on his head, so he went to Mexico to give himself time to re-group etc....



That article is about Salvatore Scoppa and it's not clear who wanted him dead. Andrea Scoppa was on good terms with the Rizzutos, but that may have changed. However, brothers don't have to be on the same page. A good example were the Ciancaglinis from Philly.


I do not know how good your French is but this article makes it perfectly clear that Salvatore is a rival. His brother was in good terms with Rizzuto, they all were at one time Desjardins included until war broke out. Then some had to choose sides. Whether there is a split between brothers remains to be seen. They could also be playing the good guy bad guy scenario. Furthermore, in other articles I read the other brother Andrea and DeVito were associates and everyone knows what side DeVito was. DeVito crew helped the Scoppa brothers in trying to retrieve money from Nino Debartolomeis (kidnapping). Andrea took the wrap.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/22/16 01:01 PM

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/10...-clan-calabrais

Translation:


FÉLIX SÉGUIN
Saturday, October 22, 2016 0:00Update Saturday, October 22, 2016 0:00
The mafiosi Vincenzo Spagnolo, shot in Laval last Saturday, was part of a short list of men to be slaughtered by the Calabrian mafia, according to sources consulted by our Bureau of Investigation.
According to these informants, it appears that the obstacles for a great return to Montreal of the Calabrian mafia, confined for 40 years in the Toronto area, are less and less numerous.
For one of the few times, the police experts and sources speak with one voice; it is a matter of time before the 'Ndrangheta (Calabrian mafia region of Italy) relocates to the metropolis.
"It's not just a matter of revenge of the Calabrian faction that is behind all this recent months, but it is also a clear intention to eradicate the heads of the Sicilian faction of the Montreal Mafia," comments by Pierre De Champlain, former RCMP analyst and researcher on the mafia.
"There will be more killings of people linked to the clan of Vito Rizzuto, it is almost certain," said a source familiar with the tensions in the Italian organized crime in Montreal.
"But the list of individuals to eliminate is beginning to shorten dramatically," the source added.
Toronto-Montreal-Hamilton
The Sûreté du Québec, which is responsible for shedding light on this case, is more cautious. "For the moment, it is too early to advance one hypothesis rather than another because the investigation is just beginning," said Captain Guy Lapointe.
According to our information, there has been a significant increase in back and forth visits of Ontario individuals linked to the Calabrian clan in recent weeks.
Some even come from Hamilton, confirms a source familiar with this matter, and this is not "by chance".
Still in Loreto
Yesterday, for a rainy afternoon, the remains of Vincenzo Spagnolo was exposed to Loreto funeral home in St. Leonard.
An hour after the opening of the visitations, the parking was already crowded.
Under the watchful eye of the police intelligence services, we saw discreetly, family members arrive, Rizzuto, Cammisano and Salvaggio , all relatives of organized crime.
The funeral of the man of 65 years will be celebrated today in the church Notre-Dame-du-Mont-Carmel Saint-Léonard, where many other mafiosi’s before were brought to their final rest.

Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/23/16 06:22 PM

Remeber the old guy from up there was at his winter house in florida and the roof collapsed on him his kids were against rizzuto was that officialy called a accident nd what happend to the kids. There businesses were getting fire bombed and they went into hiding?
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/23/16 06:36 PM

While the papers are calling for the Rizzuto's death up there (we've heard that before) I think that if Rizzuto doesn't get out fairly quick and Sollecito doesn't get over this cancer they are done. Of course you never know with this bunch.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/23/16 07:08 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
While the papers are calling for the Rizzuto's death up there (we've heard that before) I think that if Rizzuto doesn't get out fairly quick and Sollecito doesn't get over this cancer they are done. Of course you never know with this bunch.


true, but what we don't know the position of Frank Arcadi, he will be out soon. Arcadi always supported the Rizzutos.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/23/16 07:53 PM

Originally Posted By: pmac
Remeber the old guy from up there was at his winter house in florida and the roof collapsed on him his kids were against rizzuto was that officialy called a accident nd what happend to the kids. There businesses were getting fire bombed and they went into hiding?


The old guy's name you are referring to is Domenico Arcuri Sr. The roof of a one-storey industrial garage collapsed. I think it was accidental but some say otherwise. His son's have been low key lately, you don't here much of them.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/24/16 12:58 AM

Wasnt the arcuri sons a big thing to do with this or did the media portray bad in the start of this. Or i should sy when vito got out of prison. Does anyone know if vito wraped up his 8yrs in colorado thats pretty bad ass i guess a short bid like that to be held in the max no moves or halfway house thing. He was kinda a big deal with clout that could pull strings or just a unlimited amount of money and after his dad n kid was killed the american feds probaly said no way to a prison transfer even to upsate ny i think there a couple federal prisons up there. Fucking cold out tonight had to put my gas on to 65im a cheap prick thAnks canada for the blast of artic air.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/24/16 01:00 AM

There surposed to accommodate a federal prisoner to the closet 150mile place to his house so for him to be in colorado like 1 2 or 3 years before his release date that shit was being talked about around Washington dc.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/24/16 02:40 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
true, but what we don't know the position of Frank Arcadi, he will be out soon. Arcadi always supported the Rizzutos.


I agree. If Arcadi does stay with them it will be huge I think.

Originally Posted By: pmac
Wasnt the arcuri sons a big thing to do with this or did the media portray bad in the start of this. Or i should sy when vito got out of prison. Does anyone know if vito wraped up his 8yrs in colorado thats pretty bad ass i guess a short bid like that to be held in the max no moves or halfway house thing.


I don't think they could do a halfway house deal because he was a Canadian citizen. The U.S. offered him to get out early at sentencing but he would have had to stay in the U.S. until his restrictions were up and he decided against it.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/24/16 05:08 PM

Another young man has gone missing and has possible links to the Mafia. He was close to Joe Closure, murdered a few years ago.

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...61_section_POS3

Also noticed that this individual has pictures with Marco Campellone, a young man killed last year who was close to Sollecito.

The two brother who have gone missing may have been behind this or part of the same crew.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/24/16 05:10 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/10...-clan-calabrais

Translation:


FÉLIX SÉGUIN
Saturday, October 22, 2016 0:00Update Saturday, October 22, 2016 0:00
The mafiosi Vincenzo Spagnolo, shot in Laval last Saturday, was part of a short list of men to be slaughtered by the Calabrian mafia, according to sources consulted by our Bureau of Investigation.
According to these informants, it appears that the obstacles for a great return to Montreal of the Calabrian mafia, confined for 40 years in the Toronto area, are less and less numerous.
For one of the few times, the police experts and sources speak with one voice; it is a matter of time before the 'Ndrangheta (Calabrian mafia region of Italy) relocates to the metropolis.
"It's not just a matter of revenge of the Calabrian faction that is behind all this recent months, but it is also a clear intention to eradicate the heads of the Sicilian faction of the Montreal Mafia," comments by Pierre De Champlain, former RCMP analyst and researcher on the mafia.
"There will be more killings of people linked to the clan of Vito Rizzuto, it is almost certain," said a source familiar with the tensions in the Italian organized crime in Montreal.
"But the list of individuals to eliminate is beginning to shorten dramatically," the source added.
Toronto-Montreal-Hamilton
The Sûreté du Québec, which is responsible for shedding light on this case, is more cautious. "For the moment, it is too early to advance one hypothesis rather than another because the investigation is just beginning," said Captain Guy Lapointe.
According to our information, there has been a significant increase in back and forth visits of Ontario individuals linked to the Calabrian clan in recent weeks.
Some even come from Hamilton, confirms a source familiar with this matter, and this is not "by chance".
Still in Loreto
Yesterday, for a rainy afternoon, the remains of Vincenzo Spagnolo was exposed to Loreto funeral home in St. Leonard.
An hour after the opening of the visitations, the parking was already crowded.
Under the watchful eye of the police intelligence services, we saw discreetly, family members arrive, Rizzuto, Cammisano and Salvaggio , all relatives of organized crime.
The funeral of the man of 65 years will be celebrated today in the church Notre-Dame-du-Mont-Carmel Saint-Léonard, where many other mafiosi’s before were brought to their final rest.



It's definetly an interesting perspective and seems more convincing than the same theory which was spoken of back in 2009.

What is occuring most likely is local players, remnants of the rival factions, have partnered up to take over.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/24/16 07:22 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment

If it is true that Ontario Calabrian clans are behind all this then you will have some of these clans or ndrine establish themselves in Montreal. That is a pattern of how they operate in other countries or cities.


If they are involved in the war remains to be seen, but I agree that's how they work. Most people don't understand the 'Ndrangheta its a sect.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/24/16 08:00 PM

I agree it does sound more convincing. Felix Sequin in a previous article
stated "For one of the few times, the police experts and sources speak with one voice" and both Montreal mainstream newspapers are more or less advancing the same theory.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/24/16 09:40 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Another young man has gone missing and has possible links to the Mafia. He was close to Joe Closure, murdered a few years ago.

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...61_section_POS3

Also noticed that this individual has pictures with Marco Campellone, a young man killed last year who was close to Sollecito.

The two brother who have gone missing may have been behind this or part of the same crew.


They do like lupara bianca over there.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/24/16 10:12 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: Ciment

If it is true that Ontario Calabrian clans are behind all this then you will have some of these clans or ndrine establish themselves in Montreal. That is a pattern of how they operate in other countries or cities.


If they are involved in the war remains to be seen, but I agree that's how they work. Most people don't understand the 'Ndrangheta its a sect.


Yes, it will be interesting to know which of the 10 clans from both Toronto & Hamilton are involved.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/24/16 10:27 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Another young man has gone missing and has possible links to the Mafia. He was close to Joe Closure, murdered a few years ago.

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...61_section_POS3

Also noticed that this individual has pictures with Marco Campellone, a young man killed last year who was close to Sollecito.

The two brother who have gone missing may have been behind this or part of the same crew.


The pictures you are talking about are those the ones taken from Marco Campellone funeral because there is one guy that looks like Constantinou ? Also when I read an article about the two missing brothers Falduto, it mentioned that they had ties to the late L.Giordano,it gets a little confusing sometimes.
Posted By: m2w

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/25/16 02:31 PM

at this point there are two strong factions fighting one is probably supported by 'ndrangheta (old cotroni crew) and the other by the caruana-[BadWord]'s (rizzuto) that's why this is a never ending war
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/25/16 10:27 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: Ciment

If it is true that Ontario Calabrian clans are behind all this then you will have some of these clans or ndrine establish themselves in Montreal. That is a pattern of how they operate in other countries or cities.


If they are involved in the war remains to be seen, but I agree that's how they work. Most people don't understand the 'Ndrangheta its a sect.


Yes, it will be interesting to know which of the 10 clans from both Toronto & Hamilton are involved.


I only know Jimmy DeMaria was considered by police to be a GTA enemy of Vito.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/25/16 11:30 PM

Yes your right he would be one to consider ,his cousin Cortese was in Montreal and was arrested days after Nick Sr. shooting.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/26/16 12:18 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Yes your right he would be to consider ,his cousin Cortese was in Montreal and was arrested days after Nick Sr. shooting.


And according to Italian authorities he has a seat on the Camera di Controllo formed in Toronto in 1962. Vito wanted to expand in Ontario first so it wouldn't be far fetched if it's now the other way around.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/26/16 03:00 AM

...
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/27/16 06:05 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Another young man has gone missing and has possible links to the Mafia. He was close to Joe Closure, murdered a few years ago.

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...61_section_POS3

Also noticed that this individual has pictures with Marco Campellone, a young man killed last year who was close to Sollecito.

The two brother who have gone missing may have been behind this or part of the same crew.


You think the brothers could be behind the murder of Campellone?
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/29/16 02:35 PM

Originally Posted By: m2w
at this point there are two strong factions fighting one is probably supported by 'ndrangheta (old cotroni crew) and the other by the caruana-[BadWord]'s (rizzuto) that's why this is a never ending war


I don't think it's that black and white Arcadi for example has always been a Rizzuto guy, but is very close to 'ndrangheta could be even a member back in Calabria.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/29/16 06:34 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
I don't think it's that black and white Arcadi for example has always been a Rizzuto guy, but is very close to 'ndrangheta could be even a member back in Calabria.


I still think he's the most important factor at this point, who does he go with? Will make things interesting for sure.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/29/16 07:41 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: eurodave
Another young man has gone missing and has possible links to the Mafia. He was close to Joe Closure, murdered a few years ago.

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...61_section_POS3

Also noticed that this individual has pictures with Marco Campellone, a young man killed last year who was close to Sollecito.

The two brother who have gone missing may have been behind this or part of the same crew.


You think the brothers could be behind the murder of Campellone?


http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...cently-murdered

I believe journalist Daniel Renaud may have made a mistake with Marco Campellone being associated with Sollecito. The Campellone's worked for the Padula brothers who are associated with the Devito clan.
In relation to the Falduto brothers, one of them owned a cafe in a building that was owned by Giordano. This would make them rivals.
Steven Constantinou worked with Carlo Colapelle who is associated with the Desjardin clan. What I see here is a turf war that is still on going.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/29/16 07:43 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
Originally Posted By: Hollander
I don't think it's that black and white Arcadi for example has always been a Rizzuto guy, but is very close to 'ndrangheta could be even a member back in Calabria.


I still think he's the most important factor at this point, who does he go with? Will make things interesting for sure.


Yes he was the streetboss when Vito was away and no doubt he's still pulling strings from behind bars.
Posted By: m2w

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/31/16 01:15 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
I don't think it's that black and white Arcadi for example has always been a Rizzuto guy, but is very close to 'ndrangheta could be even a member back in Calabria.


it's right that the so-called sicilian and calabrian factions are mixep up with even not-italians, but as i said the sicilians are supported by the caruana-c untrera's and the calabrians by gta ndrangheta... the alliance beteween caruana- c untrera's and ndrangheta broke after the murdr of agostino cun trera and the murders of moreno gallo, verduci and calautti are sure carried out by the caruana- c untrera's
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/31/16 08:12 PM

Originally Posted By: m2w
Originally Posted By: Hollander
I don't think it's that black and white Arcadi for example has always been a Rizzuto guy, but is very close to 'ndrangheta could be even a member back in Calabria.


it's right that the so-called sicilian and calabrian factions are mixep up with even not-italians, but as i said the sicilians are supported by the caruana-c untrera's and the calabrians by gta ndrangheta... the alliance beteween caruana- c untrera's and ndrangheta broke after the murdr of agostino cun trera and the murders of moreno gallo, verduci and calautti are sure carried out by the caruana- c untrera's


The book "Business or Blood" page 144 contradicts your statement.

Business or Blood quotes:

"What the surveillance officers saw immediately after the funeral visitation might have shocked even Vito. Stalteri's mourners climbed onto a chartered bus and rode off to the anniversary reception for the [BadWord]. How could this be possible ? Weren't they mortal,blood enemies?
And yet it was clearly happening. Members of both the Sicilian and Calabrian factions of Canadian organized crime, including reps. from Hamilton,York Region,Ottawa,Montreal and Sherbrooke,Quebec, were breaking bread together as if they were on some mob version of homecoming week."

The author further down the page writes' quote:
"It was unthinkable, but it was happening right in front of the intelligence officers. What police witnessed was bonding between the Ontario Sicilians and the Ndrangheta, less than seven months after the murders of Agostino [BadWord] and his bodyguard in Montreal, and two months after the murder of Nicolo. It had been widely assumed that the Sicilians and the Calabrians mobsters were at war in, Montreal but that was clearly not the case in Toronto."

The author had more to say on this subject but you get the message.

Police intelligence picked up conversations and Verduci killing was a thing between Calabrians. Calautti owed money and had many enemies, hard to pinpoint if it was ordered by Rizzuto or the Ontario Ndrangheta.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 10/31/16 08:34 PM

Yes Climent I remember antimafia posting about that golden wedding anniversary in Vaughan, but we didn't know at the time it was that of Paolo Cun trera.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/01/16 12:01 PM

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/10...e-de-sa-voiture

The body of Steven Constantinou found in trunk of a car.

MONTREAL - The body of a man found in the trunk of a car Monday morning in Saint-Leonard area, Montreal, would be that of Steven Constantinou, a man linked to the Montreal Mafia missing for three weeks QMI Agency has learned.
The investigation into the disappearance of the young man of 22 years is now a murder.
It is not known yet how the victim was murdered and how long the crime was committed.

Earlier this month, the Montreal police had issued a notice of disappearance concerning Constantinou and asking the public's help to find him.
The body was discovered in the trunk of a black Dodge Caliber parked on Avenue Paul-Émile-Lamarche near the rue du Creusot. This is the same car with which Constantinou had left his home in the borough of LaSalle, October 8. He then mentioned his family that he was going out shopping, but he never returned home. He was never seen alive either.

Reached by telephone QMI Agency, the young man's mother was inconsolable. She would not react to the murder of his son. "I'm sorry, but that's not the right time to talk," she breathed, the faint voice.
Reportedly, Steven Constantinou would have already had business ties with Giuseppe "Closure" Colapelle, a major drug importer related to Italian organized crime. Colapelle was shot in March 2012 while he was in his vehicle parked in the parking lot of the bar Beaches, in the Saint-Leonard neighborhood.
Connections to larger sizes
According to our sources, Steven Constantinou also had links with two heavyweights of the Montreal Mafia, or Marco Pizzi and Liborio "Poncho" [BadWord]. These have both been pinned in May as part of a major police operation of the RCMP against the Montreal Mafia.
The murder of Steven Constantinou is the 18th to take place in Montreal since the beginning of the year. No arrests have yet been made in connection with this crime.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/01/16 01:17 PM

^^^^
The vehicle was found close to Ital Gelati, owned by the Arcuri family. Is there any significance?

https://goo.gl/maps/Qs8DFBS45iC2
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/01/16 03:04 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
^^^^
The vehicle was found close to Ital Gelati, owned by the Arcuri family. Is there any significance?

https://goo.gl/maps/Qs8DFBS45iC2


Possible but unlikely...it's also within walking distance of Cun-trera's food business. Hard to say why there

This young man was also good friends with Campellone, murdered last year.

Something is definetely going on if young aspiring men are getting clipped. It was quite uncommon before Operation Colisee to see young mid-level guys get whacked.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/01/16 07:35 PM

For them to leave the car within walking distance is definitely
a message.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/01/16 09:19 PM

^^^^
So 240 m (787 ft.) from Ital Gelati, and 400 m (1,312 ft.) from Distribution John & Dino.

That area sure has seen some significant mob-related crime in the last few years. There was also that firebombing of Garage Car-Pro, right beside Ital-Gelati, in 2012--"collateral damage" is what the media called it.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/01/16 09:24 PM

This guy has been missing since Oct. 8, 2016. I wonder why it took the cops that long to find the car ?
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/02/16 12:32 AM

@Climent

Great catch there, I saw that post and remembered the paragraph in Business or Blood, that you just posted but I couldn't remember exactly where in the book it was. Great point there.

I had a little bit of a frustrating convo in another thread, ( I still love you Alfa lol) I actually think the CC clan were the real controllers of the Rizzutos, not really the Bonnanos. I also believe that they are so important to European OC, and the European drug trade in general, that they are TOO BIG to deal with one mafia, or one city, or even one continent.

I I asked before, where the CC clan fits in as far as the power structure today. I know there was a list of Bosses posted, the Scoppas, Dejardins, and a [BadWord]-Ra? Or is it a Caruana? I gotta check again....
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/02/16 11:00 AM

Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen


I actually think the CC clan were the real controllers of the Rizzutos, not really the Bonnanos. I also believe that they are so important to European OC, and the European drug trade in general, that they are TOO BIG to deal with one mafia, or one city, or even one continent.


That's right. Alfonso Caruana will be out in about 36 months I think, he planned to return to Canada. I'm sure he has still the support of the 'ndrangheta.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/02/16 07:18 PM

Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
@Climent

Great catch there, I saw that post and remembered the paragraph in Business or Blood, that you just posted but I couldn't remember exactly where in the book it was. Great point there.

I had a little bit of a frustrating convo in another thread, ( I still love you Alfa lol) I actually think the CC clan were the real controllers of the Rizzutos, not really the Bonnanos. I also believe that they are so important to European OC, and the European drug trade in general, that they are TOO BIG to deal with one mafia, or one city, or even one continent.

I I asked before, where the CC clan fits in as far as the power structure today. I know there was a list of Bosses posted, the Scoppas, Dejardins, and a [BadWord]-Ra? Or is it a Caruana? I gotta check again....


In my opinion the Caruana/Cun trera clan are very influential and wealthy. As you already know,their interest is more in drug import/export and money laundering. With the exception of their cousin Agostino & son who decided to join the ranks in Montreal,they are more in building drug trading alliances with other OC clans worldwide. I believe Rizzuto's success was build on that alliance he had with the Caruana/Cun trera clan.I think the Rizzuto's needed them more than the other way around.
With regards to the Bonnano's and again it is my opinion, the Rizzuto's used the LCN to serve their own purpose, their true loyalty lie with their own Sicilian clan at home and abroad.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/02/16 07:29 PM

http://www.thesundayleader.lk/2016/10/03/lankan-scapegoats-of-global-drug-trafficking-mafia/

Cabrini, I know it's a little off topic but I came across this article that I find may interest you,seeing that you like to comment on how drugs are being shipped.
Posted By: BillyBrizzi

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/02/16 08:09 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.thesundayleader.lk/2016/10/03/lankan-scapegoats-of-global-drug-trafficking-mafia/

Cabrini, I know it's a little off topic but I came across this article that I find may interest you,seeing that you like to comment on how drugs are being shipped.


Very interesting article, thanks Ciment..
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/03/16 02:12 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
@Climent

Great catch there, I saw that post and remembered the paragraph in Business or Blood, that you just posted but I couldn't remember exactly where in the book it was. Great point there.

I had a little bit of a frustrating convo in another thread, ( I still love you Alfa lol) I actually think the CC clan were the real controllers of the Rizzutos, not really the Bonnanos. I also believe that they are so important to European OC, and the European drug trade in general, that they are TOO BIG to deal with one mafia, or one city, or even one continent.

I I asked before, where the CC clan fits in as far as the power structure today. I know there was a list of Bosses posted, the Scoppas, Dejardins, and a [BadWord]-Ra? Or is it a Caruana? I gotta check again....


In my opinion the Caruana/Cun trera clan are very influential and wealthy. As you already know,their interest is more in drug import/export and money laundering. With the exception of their cousin Agostino & son who decided to join the ranks in Montreal,they are more in building drug trading alliances with other OC clans worldwide. I believe Rizzuto's success was build on that alliance he had with the Caruana/Cun trera clan.I think the Rizzuto's needed them more than the other way around.
With regards to the Bonnano's and again it is my opinion, the Rizzuto's used the LCN to serve their own purpose, their true loyalty lie with their own Sicilian clan at home and abroad.


Although I'm sure still influential, I personally think their role and influenced has diminished over the last 15 years or so.

Recent investigations in Italy continually show how Catania and Palermo families get their coke from the Calabrians. This pattern seem to replicate itself in parts of NYC so why wouldn't it happen here in Canada?

The Ndrangheta is moving tons of blow around the globe daily, on behalf of and for other organizations as well.

Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/03/16 03:36 PM

@eurodave


I'm sure you are correct there. It's something I noticed a long time ago. Sinaloa over here, Ndrangheta over there, plus Ontario. Add in the Calabrian infiltration of places like Milan, Germany and they have their own laundering networks as well.


I just notice a lot of guys seem to want to follow who got killed. What faction, how many soldiers, what rank. I just follow the drugs, it leads RIGHT to who's really in charge. Everything else is a realignment of business interest in regards to whomever is controlling the flow of narcotics. That's where the power is. Who has the connect, who can get it from here to there, who can distribute it. Figure those out, and the rank and all that sorts itself out... That's my take on it anyway..

Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/03/16 03:41 PM

@ciment

Great find on that article, I read a little on how the Calabrian clans work the docks there. I was surprised to find out there was no like central control mechanism like a union. It's just the dock is so vast and under policed that they just " Rob" the contraband before anyone can be any wiser. It's kinda "Democratized" any clan can create contacts at the docks from what I could gather.

It gives more insight to the NY operations, with Calabrian families setting up routes outside the Siderno groups operations. Sending it to their own contacts at the docks on the other end.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/03/16 06:57 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
@Climent

Great catch there, I saw that post and remembered the paragraph in Business or Blood, that you just posted but I couldn't remember exactly where in the book it was. Great point there.

I had a little bit of a frustrating convo in another thread, ( I still love you Alfa lol) I actually think the CC clan were the real controllers of the Rizzutos, not really the Bonnanos. I also believe that they are so important to European OC, and the European drug trade in general, that they are TOO BIG to deal with one mafia, or one city, or even one continent.

I I asked before, where the CC clan fits in as far as the power structure today. I know there was a list of Bosses posted, the Scoppas, Dejardins, and a [BadWord]-Ra? Or is it a Caruana? I gotta check again....


In my opinion the Caruana/Cun trera clan are very influential and wealthy. As you already know,their interest is more in drug import/export and money laundering. With the exception of their cousin Agostino & son who decided to join the ranks in Montreal,they are more in building drug trading alliances with other OC clans worldwide. I believe Rizzuto's success was build on that alliance he had with the Caruana/Cun trera clan.I think the Rizzuto's needed them more than the other way around.
With regards to the Bonnano's and again it is my opinion, the Rizzuto's used the LCN to serve their own purpose, their true loyalty lie with their own Sicilian clan at home and abroad.


Although I'm sure still influential, I personally think their role and influenced has diminished over the last 15 years or so.

Recent investigations in Italy continually show how Catania and Palermo families get their coke from the Calabrians. This pattern seem to replicate itself in parts of NYC so why wouldn't it happen here in Canada?

The Ndrangheta is moving tons of blow around the globe daily, on behalf of and for other organizations as well.



I agree with you Eurodave, I was in no way comparing them with the Ndrangheta, I was comparing Caruana/Cun trera with the Rizzuto's in reference to Cabrini's post. I understood the CC clan as being Caruana/Cun trera unless I misunderstood what CC clan stands for.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/03/16 09:43 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave


Although I'm sure still influential, I personally think their role and influenced has diminished over the last 15 years or so.

Recent investigations in Italy continually show how Catania and Palermo families get their coke from the Calabrians. This pattern seem to replicate itself in parts of NYC so why wouldn't it happen here in Canada?

The Ndrangheta is moving tons of blow around the globe daily, on behalf of and for other organizations as well.



Cosa Nostra is still recovering from it's war against the italian state, but Provenzano as well as Messina Denaro have brought them back on the international level. Younger guys like Big Joe Cun trera will benefit from that. I send you a pm Dave.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/04/16 06:21 AM

I see the CC clan as like, the Colombia to the Calabrians Mexico. The predecessors and their inheritors. As far as the European and Canadian markets are concerned.

Maybe you guys can shed some light, WHEN exactly did Ndrangheta become dominant in the cocaine trade? It seems to have been a gradual thing... Any idea on what years this takeover became complete? I'm thinking between like 2000-2010? Somewhere in there?

Any thoughts?
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/04/16 02:20 PM

Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I see the CC clan as like, the Colombia to the Calabrians Mexico. The predecessors and their inheritors. As far as the European and Canadian markets are concerned.

Maybe you guys can shed some light, WHEN exactly did Ndrangheta become dominant in the cocaine trade? It seems to have been a gradual thing... Any idea on what years this takeover became complete? I'm thinking between like 2000-2010? Somewhere in there?

Any thoughts?


I recall reading news back in 2005 or 2006 not only about the 'ndrangheta's dominance in the European cocaine market but also the 'ndrangheta's having eclipsed the Sicilian Costa Nostra as Italy's largest criminal group.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/04/16 02:36 PM

In the late 1990's.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/04/16 03:02 PM

Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I see the CC clan as like, the Colombia to the Calabrians Mexico. The predecessors and their inheritors. As far as the European and Canadian markets are concerned.

Maybe you guys can shed some light, WHEN exactly did Ndrangheta become dominant in the cocaine trade? It seems to have been a gradual thing... Any idea on what years this takeover became complete? I'm thinking between like 2000-2010? Somewhere in there?

Any thoughts?


It seems the Cosa Nostra clans starting losing some clout in the mid to late 90's. At that time or before, Calabrian clans from all over Reggio were buying or importing blow via their Sicilian contacts while establishing their own routes. Aynone remember the 94' bust from the CC clan in Torino? That load was destined to Cosa Nostra and Ndrangheta consortium.

By the late 90's, they had established themselves well in Latin America and began brokering for ndrine all over the world and also for Sicilians and Neapolitans.

Their rise to prominance most likely began early 2000's and due to their secrecy and lack of informants, the organization prospered. It seems they've consolidated their power the most in the last 10 years in North America, mainly the Toronto-NYC-Montreal mafia trifecta, eclipsing on an import-export base, the traditional LCN routes.

What I find intriguing is how the calabrians operate below the radar, functioning on a cartel model, buying and moving huge quantities of blow around the globe in groups, therefore making it harder to pinpoint one specific leader, where as many knew for years that Vito and the CC were the go to guys for Montreal and transplanted Sicilians.

Who truly leads the GTA families? who calls the shots? is it back home?

Also worthy of mention is an anecdote in the book the sixth family which revealed intercepted conversations between Vito and Zappia about the potential bridge scheme between continent and Sicily. In this convo, Zappia states that both parties need to be happy and how the Calabrians are stronger, more organized and have better political contacts. This was 2003-2004

" Perché lì si deve fare il ponte tenendo contenti tutti quelli della Sicilia, la gang, capisci? In questo affare c’è moneta per loro. Ti dico un’altra cosa: è che c’è un lato la mafia, la Sicilia. Di quell’altro posto c’è la ‘ndrangheta. La ‘ndrangheta calabrese è più forte della cosa siciliana, sì, basata su attività di costruzione e di attività anche di influenza politica. Sono più organizzati i calabresi che i siciliani. Allora la ‘ndrangheta è più forte della mafia>>.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/04/16 04:50 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave

Also worthy of mention is an anecdote in the book the sixth family which revealed intercepted conversations between Vito and Zappia about the potential bridge scheme between continent and Sicily. In this convo, Zappia states that both parties need to be happy and how the Calabrians are stronger, more organized and have better political contacts. This was 2003-2004

" Perché lì si deve fare il ponte tenendo contenti tutti quelli della Sicilia, la gang, capisci? In questo affare c’è moneta per loro. Ti dico un’altra cosa: è che c’è un lato la mafia, la Sicilia. Di quell’altro posto c’è la ‘ndrangheta. La ‘ndrangheta calabrese è più forte della cosa siciliana, sì, basata su attività di costruzione e di attività anche di influenza politica. Sono più organizzati i calabresi che i siciliani. Allora la ‘ndrangheta è più forte della mafia>>.


Dave, the Italian quote above is an excerpt of a phone conversation between Giuseppe Zappia and Filippo Ranieri. The excerpt does not appear in either English or Italian in the three English-language editions of The Sixth Family, but that quote and the larger excerpt were indeed widely reported in the Italian media.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/04/16 05:13 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: eurodave

Also worthy of mention is an anecdote in the book the sixth family which revealed intercepted conversations between Vito and Zappia about the potential bridge scheme between continent and Sicily. In this convo, Zappia states that both parties need to be happy and how the Calabrians are stronger, more organized and have better political contacts. This was 2003-2004

" Perché lì si deve fare il ponte tenendo contenti tutti quelli della Sicilia, la gang, capisci? In questo affare c’è moneta per loro. Ti dico un’altra cosa: è che c’è un lato la mafia, la Sicilia. Di quell’altro posto c’è la ‘ndrangheta. La ‘ndrangheta calabrese è più forte della cosa siciliana, sì, basata su attività di costruzione e di attività anche di influenza politica. Sono più organizzati i calabresi che i siciliani. Allora la ‘ndrangheta è più forte della mafia>>.


Dave, the Italian quote above is an excerpt of a phone conversation between Giuseppe Zappia and Filippo Ranieri. The excerpt does not appear in either English or Italian in the three English-language editions of The Sixth Family, but that quote and the larger excerpt were indeed widely reported in the Italian media.


My bad, it was from Italian law enforcement.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/04/16 05:24 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave


Who truly leads the GTA families? who calls the shots? is it back home?


I think so, they all report directly to bosses in Calabria and profits are funnelled back to the mother organisation.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/04/16 07:07 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I gotta confirm, Sinatra Club called that Scoppa thing forever ago, before it came out in the papers, I was quite impressed frankly lol


Nothing has come out in the papers about the Scoppa brothers yet. It's only speculation.


http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-policiers.php

For the record the Scoppa's were mentioned in various articles dating back over a decade. The one I posted above dates Oct. 14 2014. Daniel Renaud has been writing about them for years. This pre-dates claims by a certain individual on these posts, that said he called it months ago.
Eurodave is correct he was an associate of Gallo at one time, they do carry weight. They were neutral at first when the war began but now considered rivals.
They are Calabrian. Some of his associates were/are DeVito (Calabrian), Piccirilli(Calabrian),Mirarchi(Calabrian).They all have close ties with the bikers MC (Cazzetta). Most of them made trips to Ontario. If you connect the dots you get the big picture.


For the record, no. Because I was specifically referring to the Scoppa's & their involvement in recent going ons, not just bringing them up for the sake of conversating about them, which is what Cabrini is saying. And Sonny Black is right, nothing ever came out in the papers about them being involved, other than the article that's been linked which mentions the both of them possibly being a part of the new "Montreal Mafia consortium" or whatever you want to call it. Which along with personal research, is what I used to base my theory that they COULD be one of the parties behind all of this.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/04/16 09:44 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I gotta confirm, Sinatra Club called that Scoppa thing forever ago, before it came out in the papers, I was quite impressed frankly lol


Nothing has come out in the papers about the Scoppa brothers yet. It's only speculation.


http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-policiers.php

For the record the Scoppa's were mentioned in various articles dating back over a decade. The one I posted above dates Oct. 14 2014. Daniel Renaud has been writing about them for years. This pre-dates claims by a certain individual on these posts, that said he called it months ago.
Eurodave is correct he was an associate of Gallo at one time, they do carry weight. They were neutral at first when the war began but now considered rivals.
They are Calabrian. Some of his associates were/are DeVito (Calabrian), Piccirilli(Calabrian),Mirarchi(Calabrian).They all have close ties with the bikers MC (Cazzetta). Most of them made trips to Ontario. If you connect the dots you get the big picture.


For the record, no. Because I was specifically referring to the Scoppa's & their involvement in recent going ons, not just bringing them up for the sake of conversating about them, which is what Cabrini is saying. And Sonny Black is right, nothing ever came out in the papers about them being involved, other than the article that's been linked which mentions the both of them possibly being a part of the new "Montreal Mafia consortium" or whatever you want to call it. Which along with personal research, is what I used to base my theory that they COULD be one of the parties behind all of this.


When you brought him up then, I told you that I had read about him before. Daniel Renaud has written about him in the the Journal de Montreal and Daniel also wrote about him while working at LaPresse.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/05/16 03:04 AM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I gotta confirm, Sinatra Club called that Scoppa thing forever ago, before it came out in the papers, I was quite impressed frankly lol


Nothing has come out in the papers about the Scoppa brothers yet. It's only speculation.


http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-policiers.php

For the record the Scoppa's were mentioned in various articles dating back over a decade. The one I posted above dates Oct. 14 2014. Daniel Renaud has been writing about them for years. This pre-dates claims by a certain individual on these posts, that said he called it months ago.
Eurodave is correct he was an associate of Gallo at one time, they do carry weight. They were neutral at first when the war began but now considered rivals.
They are Calabrian. Some of his associates were/are DeVito (Calabrian), Piccirilli(Calabrian),Mirarchi(Calabrian).They all have close ties with the bikers MC (Cazzetta). Most of them made trips to Ontario. If you connect the dots you get the big picture.


For the record, no. Because I was specifically referring to the Scoppa's & their involvement in recent going ons, not just bringing them up for the sake of conversating about them, which is what Cabrini is saying. And Sonny Black is right, nothing ever came out in the papers about them being involved, other than the article that's been linked which mentions the both of them possibly being a part of the new "Montreal Mafia consortium" or whatever you want to call it. Which along with personal research, is what I used to base my theory that they COULD be one of the parties behind all of this.


Furthermore, since you mention Sonny Black and Cabrini. Unlike you, I can dialogue with them. They don't pretend to know everything. They are not condescending.It is okay to disagree and respect each other. You seem to get along with them but for some reason we do not see eye to eye.
I know we started on the wrong footage prior to this Scoppa thing and I am willing to extend an olive branch; provided that we start anew with mutual respect. It's your call.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/05/16 10:32 AM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
I see the CC clan as like, the Colombia to the Calabrians Mexico. The predecessors and their inheritors. As far as the European and Canadian markets are concerned.

Maybe you guys can shed some light, WHEN exactly did Ndrangheta become dominant in the cocaine trade? It seems to have been a gradual thing... Any idea on what years this takeover became complete? I'm thinking between like 2000-2010? Somewhere in there?

Any thoughts?


I recall reading news back in 2005 or 2006 not only about the 'ndrangheta's dominance in the European cocaine market but also the 'ndrangheta's having eclipsed the Sicilian Costa Nostra as Italy's largest criminal group.


You only have to look at all the police operations and trials in Italy the 'Ndrangheta is everywhere. Cosa Nostra only in Sicily, Milan and Rome. I send you a PM.

Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/05/16 11:17 AM

@ eurodave

I do remember that bust, the 5000 plus kilo one right? It's what really caught my eye as far as the Italians and the worldwide narcotic routes. That was in like 94, by the 2000s, the Mexicans were the only ones capable of such loads to the US.

And then I'm reading about the Calabrian dominance in Europe. Then I read about how they are dominant in Toronto. Then you read about the demise of Sicily. The Rizzutos being kinda cut off from NY, to me, it looked like they really only controlled Montreal. And that was based on a dominance in the Narcotics routes. So to me the writing was on the wall, that they sooner or later were going to be eclipsed by the Calabrians.

But a lot of guys STILL believe their strenghth was based on the number of Made guys or whatever. I say follow the connects and routes, see who's at the end of them. It leads to the power....
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/05/16 11:23 AM

@ Hollander

You are right, Costa Nostra in Sicily, Milan and Rome. Camorra is dominant IN Naples, maybe parts of Eastern Europe like the Chech Republic?( I say this because Saviano said the Licciardis monopolized criminal activity in the Chech Republic..) And Spain I think, I think the Camorra is very deep in Spain. They also control the INTERNAL narcotics markets in Italy I think. And they don't seem to travel abroad AT ALL...

But the Calabrians are EVERYWHERE, INCLUDING NEW YORK now. Australia, Ontario and now probably Montreal. Germany, maybe France? I'm assuming they supply the United Kingdom, although there was a Camorra clan that was HUUUUGE in Scotland the LaTorres. Basically the rest of Europe is theirs....
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/05/16 01:01 PM

The Camorra doesn't have to emigrate like the Calabrians do nor do they need to. It's all about geography and culture.

Naples as a city is rather big and it's surrounding areas are densely populated therefore the napolitani have a huge retail market to work with.

Calabria is the opposite mainly composed of smaller towns in the country side. The strongest most powerful families come from villages with no more than 5000 people. Calabrias largest city has maybe 300000k people. Compare that to Naples or even Palermo.

The calabrians emigrated and exported their crime syndicate with it. They have blood relatives in Canada Australia Germany Argentina and USA. The reason you hear less of them is that culturally speaking they are less flamboyant than either Sicilians and napolitani. They fly under the radar and would rather not be known....which by product makes their syndicate less interesting for tabloids as opposed to some camorra war or don Corleone war here in Montreal.

The truth is that everyone in italy now fears and respects the ndrangheta...when they talk others follow. Here's a video of how Cosa nostra in its hey day paid off ndrangheta just to avoid them.

https://youtu.be/LdzAsfw0_eA
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/05/16 01:27 PM

The Calabrians are also working often with local criminal groups for example in the ports of Antwerp and Rotterdam.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/06/16 04:22 AM

@eurodave


I'm right there with you. You can look at my post history, I've pretty much said the same things. Naples is URBAN, the Calabrians and Sicilians are RURAL.
I've posted on how the rural mafias have to move around the world because their surroundings simply don't have enough INDUSTRY to siphon wealth from. It was part of a long drawn out post about the difference between " Power syndicates" and "Enterprise Syndicates".

The Naples clans control the INTERNAL markets in Italy, they are in the streets. It's why I don't necessarily agree that they are " Less" organized, like you say, the culture and criminal methodology is a little different.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/06/16 01:44 PM

100% agree....Naples and to a lesser extent Cosa Nostra is highly concentrated in their geographical area although the Sicilians have always had a hard time managing urban mafia clans vs more rural clans.

The Sicilians and camorra are also very present in central and n9rthern italy and it seemseems from Italian police investigations that the three syndicates divide territory accordingly therefore rarely if ever going to war. To be honest the Canadian situation seems to be more unique where the rivalry seems more plausible.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/06/16 04:56 PM

Not related to Montreal, but it's interesting that in Australia they used a calabrian hitman in the murder of gangland lawyer Joe Acquaro on March 15. The Italian man flew back to his homeland in the days after the murder and was detained at an airport for questioning before being released.
Posted By: BillyBrizzi

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/06/16 05:37 PM

Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
@eurodave


I'm right there with you. You can look at my post history, I've pretty much said the same things. Naples is URBAN, the Calabrians and Sicilians are RURAL.
I've posted on how the rural mafias have to move around the world because their surroundings simply don't have enough INDUSTRY to siphon wealth from. It was part of a long drawn out post about the difference between " Power syndicates" and "Enterprise Syndicates".

The Naples clans control the INTERNAL markets in Italy, they are in the streets. It's why I don't necessarily agree that they are " Less" organized, like you say, the culture and criminal methodology is a little different.


You're a fuckin criminologist CC, for real..
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/06/16 09:27 PM

Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
@ eurodave

I do remember that bust, the 5000 plus kilo one right? It's what really caught my eye as far as the Italians and the worldwide narcotic routes. That was in like 94, by the 2000s, the Mexicans were the only ones capable of such loads to the US.

And then I'm reading about the Calabrian dominance in Europe. Then I read about how they are dominant in Toronto. Then you read about the demise of Sicily. The Rizzutos being kinda cut off from NY, to me, it looked like they really only controlled Montreal. And that was based on a dominance in the Narcotics routes. So to me the writing was on the wall, that they sooner or later were going to be eclipsed by the Calabrians.

But a lot of guys STILL believe their strenghth was based on the number of Made guys or whatever. I say follow the connects and routes, see who's at the end of them. It leads to the power....


In my opinion, you should look at several factors:

* the relative size of the Montreal Mafia in Quebec and the Greater Toronto Area Siderno Group in Ontario;

* how many people involved or associated with those criminal organizations engage in drug importation and trafficking (regardless of whether these individuals are inducted members or not);

* whether criminals in Quebec (Italian and otherwise) had already been buying cocaine from the GTA Siderno Group during the ongoing Montreal mob war;

* whether criminals in Quebec (Italian and otherwise) would still be able to get their coke through other suppliers even if the Siderno Group were to develop a stranglehold on the supply of cocaine through the Port of Montreal;

* control of drug importation at the Port of Montreal, i.e., corruption of stevedores and checkers;

* the level of importation of cocaine at other Canadian maritime ports (Halifax, Vancouver, Saint John, St. John's, Windsor);

* the distribution of cocaine in the aforementioned provinces (as well as provinces west of Ontario and east of Quebec);

* the current flow of narcotics;

* the current drug routes; and

* the intended remapping of the flow and routes.

The last bullet point is particularly important, as the posters arguing in this thread that the takeover of the Montreal underworld by the 'ndrangheta (read: Siderno Group) is a fait accompli are convinced that the Siderno Group will soon be flooding New York City with cocaine. How? By importing the cocaine through the Port of Montreal and then smuggling it over the Canadian border over land and into New York State.

For many years now, there has been no evidence that major or minor shipments of coke are being smuggled into the US from Canada.

Most cocaine being smuggled into Canada (the destination country) passes through the United States (transit country). The cocaine has been primarily getting into Canada over land through border points via vehicles (mostly commercial). The cocaine has also been getting through Canadian maritime ports and, to a lesser extent, through airports and parcel (for example, through the Léo-Blanchette mail processing centre, which is located in Saint-Laurent, Quebec).

The provenance of the cocaine entering Canada is known in general terms--we know the source countries are typically Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia (but not just those countries); we know that before the coke destined for Canada goes through the US, other transit countries may include Jamaica, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, or others. We also know that insofar as the cocaine entering Canada bypasses the continental US, the route is usually Mexico, up the Pacific Ocean, and into British Columbia.

When articles were written about Carmine Verduci right after his murder, we were privileged to learn in Peter Edwards's story that the route for the cocaine he was smuggling into Canada was Mexico–British Columbia–Ontario. I write "privileged" because that level of detail is hardly ever publicly available, as it is used as police intelligence. Posters on these forums, like me, can rely on newspaper articles, government-issued organized-crime backgrounders, and anti-drug institutional reports all we want; however, there are limitations to using such information. For example, you can read about cocaine smuggling routes, but the reports will only list source and destination countries. So whenever there has been a drug seizure involving cocaine in the last few years in Quebec and Ontario--not to mention in other Canadian provinces--you will read in the newspapers a list of criminals or groups charged but you won't ever find out where the cocaine came from and all the other places the cocaine travelled en route before arriving in the hands of the people charged.

There is so much more that I can write about each of the bullet points I listed farther above, but that's a lot of work. So I will just mention for now that I think we should keep a particular eye on the interaction between the Hells Angels in Ontario and those in Quebec. The fairly recent mass release of all the Hells Angels in Quebec who were originally charged in Project SharQc may have ramifications down the road if there haven't been some consequences already. Some Hells Angels chapters in both provinces have influence and control over particular Hells chapters and puppet clubs in Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island. Those of you who have read last year's Business or Blood know that the largest funeral wreath seen at Vito Rizzuto's funeral services came from the Ontario Hells; however, the landscape may have changed since the aforementioned release of all those Hells in Quebec. Similarly, although Salvatore Cazzetta seems to have been allied with the Montreal Mafia leadership after Rizzuto's death, he is now in jail--while Cazzetta is the face of the Hells in Quebec and is an influential crime figure, he may be impotent to stop any important developments he may not like within the organization.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/07/16 10:28 AM

@ Billybrizzi

Thanks man, I appreciate it lol..

@antimafia


Preach!!! Great post my man, +100

My head hurt when I read some past post in another thread about the Queens NY Calabrian bust. Everyone ( and this included respected guys on here like Pizzaboy and Ivy) they all assumed they were just some mutts pushing blow in the streets of NY. When it was like you pointed out, they were using NY as a TRANSIT POINT to ship it to Europe. (I think I pointed out before,the main route went through the Panama Canal, never even went over land..) It's interesting that coke TO Canada, goes THROUGH the US OVER land.....

I know what you mean about trying to explain it in a couple post. It's like so much information, I think I irritate people with the size of some of my post, yet I always feel like Im only scratching the surface of what I REALLY want to say lol....



Those are some great bullet points, I can't disagree with any of it.
That point you made of no Italiangroups smuggling coke into the US. You wouldn't believe the argument I had trying to explain this to Alfa. I couldn't get him to understand that coke in the US in the 80s meant Medillin cartel, 90s Cali Cartel, and 2000s and beyond, Mexican-cartels.

I like how you point out, coke through the port of Montreal doesn't even make sense if you look at a map. Another reason I was looking hard at the Rizzutos like, How are they maintaining?
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/07/16 02:10 PM

@antimafia great post as usual

Now I would like to know what you think of the following:

I personally don't think the Siderno boys are directly implicated in the Montreal situation, physically speaking of course.

That being said, considering the number of visits that local Montreal players have made in the GTA to members of the Siderno group and others, what's your take on that?

I ask because partnerships, drug routes, kickbacks and so forth are and have always been flexible and not static. Friends today can be enemies tomorrow, money and reliability triumph ethnicity in Canada.

Why and for what reason are members of the Montreal mafia visiting the GTA? Clearly it's not for the cannolis or coffee...Montreal has that covered.

Montagna, Piccirilli, De Vito, Mirarchi and co..
Posted By: Alfa Romeo

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/07/16 03:48 PM

Quote:
You wouldn't believe the argument I had trying to explain this to Alfa. I couldn't get him to understand that coke in the US in the 80s meant Medillin cartel, 90s Cali Cartel, and 2000s and beyond, Mexican-cartels.


lollollol

Cabrini, you guys are more knowledgeable in this area than myself. My point in our original debate was that the Rizzuto group was receiving dope or whatever, into Canada, on behalf of the Bonannos. It really matters not whether the contraband was sent downwards into the States, or sold retail in Canada. My point was that there was very likely a Caruana/C[untrera-Rizzuto-Bonanno axis, with the Rizzutos receiving financing from the Bonannos to function as intermediaries. Could I be wrong? Of course. But I don't believe I am.

Edit: I think it might be time to differentiate between smack (heroin) and coke. This because the coke might have been travelling upwards, but the heroin might have been travelling down [into the United States], simultaneously. Someone somewhere might have even said that one type of narcotic was used to trade for the other, as a means of payment. No money changing hands, imagine that. Opinions?
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/07/16 09:53 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
@antimafia great post as usual

Now I would like to know what you think of the following:

I personally don't think the Siderno boys are directly implicated in the Montreal situation, physically speaking of course.

That being said, considering the number of visits that local Montreal players have made in the GTA to members of the Siderno group and others, what's your take on that?

I ask because partnerships, drug routes, kickbacks and so forth are and have always been flexible and not static. Friends today can be enemies tomorrow, money and reliability triumph ethnicity in Canada.

Why and for what reason are members of the Montreal mafia visiting the GTA? Clearly it's not for the cannolis or coffee...Montreal has that covered.

Montagna, Piccirilli, De Vito, Mirarchi and co..


The book Business or Blood makes at least a dozen references about meetings between Montreal mafia members(rival to Rizzuto) having meetings with the GTA and Hamilton Ndrangheta members.
There was another mention that struck my interest,quote:
"Vito had never really liked members of the Commisso Ndrangheta family. How things stood with Carmelo Bruzzese wasn't so clear.They had once been friendly, but Bruzzese's son-in-law was Antonio Coluccio,and Coluccios seemed central to the Ndrangheta to push into Montreal."
This illustrates the Ndrangheta interest in Montreal,let alone several Montreal journalist supporting that idea.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/08/16 12:42 AM

Originally Posted By: Alfa Romeo


Edit: I think it might be time to differentiate between smack (heroin) and coke. This because the coke might have been travelling upwards, but the heroin might have been travelling down [into the United States], simultaneously. Someone somewhere might have even said that one type of narcotic was used to trade for the other, as a means of payment. No money changing hands, imagine that. Opinions?


Yes, one of the first who did that for the Sicilian Mafia and the 'Ndrangheta was early cocaine broker Roberto "The Baby" Pannunzi.

Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/08/16 11:55 AM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...afia-arrete.php

DRUGS
A MAFIA CLAN LEADER ARRESTED
DANIEL RENAUD
LA PRESSE
One of the most influential clan leaders of the Montreal Mafia at present according to police, Andrea Scoppa, aka Andrew, was recently arrested in connection with a seizure of one hundred kilos of cocaine, has told La Presse .

Scoppa, 52, was reportedly arrested with other individuals two weeks ago, questioned and then released.

"On October 26, investigators from the Joint Regional Squad North Shore have conducted searches in Montreal. But since it is under investigation, we will not give further information to not harm the investigation "simply explained Sergeant Claude Denis of the Sûreté du Québec.

Reportedly, two searches have taken place October 26 - one in the Canadian condo tower on Peel Street, and the other in an apartment building of 13 th Avenue in the Saint-Michel district, in the northeast of Montreal. No further details filtered yet. Assuming that the market value of the cocaine is currently $ 60,000 per kilogram, the total value of the seizure would amount to more than 6 million.

A GHOST
In September 2004, Andrea Scoppa was sentenced to six years in prison for a case of conspiracy and cocaine trafficking that would have passed through the United States. He and his accomplices had been compromised by a double agent. Scoppa had regained his freedom pending further proceedings after having made a deposit of $ 150,000 certified check. Apart from this case, it has little criminal history.

Yet Andrew Scoppa is considered by the police as an influential player in the Montreal Mafia has very close contact with bikers, former bikers, mobsters and other individuals linked to organized crime, Greek, Lebanese and Arabic.

The police still consider him being involved in heroin trafficking, even if he has already told the people around him to never touch this drug. His influence on territories would be Parc-Extension, Mile End, Little Italy and Lachine, Montreal. He would also be very present in Laval.

Historically, Andrew Scoppa has always been quite independent of the other clans of the Mafia. He did not take part in the struggle for influence that thrashed the Rizzuto clan during the years 2009-2010 and would have rallied with the godfather Vito Rizzuto upon his return to Montreal in the fall of 2012. However, it appeared that Scoppa was not on very good terms with those who succeeded Vito after the natural death of the latter in December 2013.

On 3 October 2015, one of his trusted men was the victim of a murder attempt,it passed came under the media radar. While the victim was about to enter the underground parking lot of a tower of condos of Dollard-des-Ormeaux area, his vehicle was riddled with five bullets fired by a suspect armed with a nine millimeter pistol with a quiet.

During the great Colosseum investigation by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police on the Montreal mafia between 2001 and 2006, Andrea Scoppa has been at the heart of a territory dispute with the Hells Angels Yves "Led" Leduc, who would have even wanted to eliminate its rival before the deceased mafia Moreno Gallo settles the dispute.

Andrea Scoppa is the brother of Salvatore Scoppa, an individual who has taken a place in recent years in the Montreal Mafia, notably in Rivière-des-Prairies, scene of many violent in recent years.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/08/16 01:20 PM

Thanks for the post.

The Scoppas are heavy indeed. This will be interesting.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/08/16 10:02 PM

Would be interesting if the Scoppas are behind the recent turmoil. Having been around for a long time and at age 52 it would be now or never. Usually 40s/50s is the age American mafiosi rise to prominence. I still think a more likely scenario is Arcadi with backing from Ontario. The Scoppas might definitely be part of the conspiracy though.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/08/16 10:21 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Would be interesting if the Scoppas are behind the recent turmoil. Having been around for a long time and at age 52 it would be now or never. Usually 40s/50s is the age American mafiosi rise to prominence. I still think a more likely scenario is Arcadi with backing from Ontario. The Scoppas might definitely be part of the conspiracy though.


Interesting scenario you propose with Arcadi but how will the Sicilian clan react to that ? They will feel betrayed.Looks like he maybe screwed either way he goes. It will be a tough decision to make.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/08/16 11:03 PM

In the news article they mention that Oct.3, 2015 there was an attempted murder on one of Scoppa's men.

I looked at the timeline and four days prior on Sept. 29, 2015 there was a molotov cocktail at Leonardo Rizzuto's law office.
I wonder now, having read this article, if the attempted murder was a retaliation from the Rizzuto's.I know it is speculation but it's something to think about. Most of 2015 all was quiet,I thought they had finally reached a peace agreement but in September when Marco Campellone got shot all hell went loose and they have been warring again ever since then.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/09/16 12:41 AM

It has been relatively quiet since Spagnolo got clipped, no molotovs or attempts of any kind.

I wonder if theres some new leadership in place now
Posted By: m2w

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/09/16 04:08 PM

Originally Posted By: CabriniGreen
You are right, Costa Nostra in Sicily, Milan and Rome. Camorra is dominant IN Naples, maybe parts of Eastern Europe like the Chech Republic?( I say this because Saviano said the Licciardis monopolized criminal activity in the Chech Republic..) And Spain I think, I think the Camorra is very deep in Spain. They also control the INTERNAL narcotics markets in Italy I think. And they don't seem to travel abroad AT ALL...

But the Calabrians are EVERYWHERE, INCLUDING NEW YORK now. Australia, Ontario and now probably Montreal. Germany, maybe France? I'm assuming they supply the United Kingdom, although there was a Camorra clan that was HUUUUGE in Scotland the LaTorres. Basically the rest of Europe is theirs....


sicilian mafia is active also in turin, bologna and genoa, in europe it has some cells in france, germany, spain and belgium
the ndrangheta is pretty much everywhere, i also read a recent article that states it is the strongest criminal group in switzerland
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/09/16 04:09 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Would be interesting if the Scoppas are behind the recent turmoil. Having been around for a long time and at age 52 it would be now or never. Usually 40s/50s is the age American mafiosi rise to prominence. I still think a more likely scenario is Arcadi with backing from Ontario. The Scoppas might definitely be part of the conspiracy though.


Interesting scenario you propose with Arcadi but how will the Sicilian clan react to that ? They will feel betrayed.Looks like he maybe screwed either way he goes. It will be a tough decision to make.


It looks like he may have betrayed them years ago. Business or Blood states how he had met with some of Vito's rivals in Ontario without Vito's consent. Also, on the old RD forum there was a poster with apparant inside knowledge who said that Arcadi had fallen out of favor with the Sicilians because he had arranged his own coke deals.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/09/16 04:11 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
It has been relatively quiet since Spagnolo got clipped, no molotovs or attempts of any kind.

I wonder if theres some new leadership in place now


I don't think it's over. In the summer months it was pretty quiet as well.

Then again, killings within the Montreal Mafia usually peak from the autumn through Christmas...
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/09/16 10:43 PM

Yep if we get through Christmas without any hits I would be very surprised.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/10/16 01:38 PM

I guess I spoke to soon.......so it begins.

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/11/10/un-restaurant-vise-par-un-cocktail-molotov-dans-ahuntsic
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/10/16 03:15 PM

Thus the saying"it ain't over until the fat lady sings". LOL
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/10/16 03:39 PM

So we might expect a few more molotovs and maybe another big hit around christmas lol

Gallo, Rizzutos, Di Maulo all got murdered during this time of the year.

November-December seem to be crappy months for mafiosi.

Maybe it's year-end overview and financials lol
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/10/16 04:15 PM

Your right, most of the big hits were during those two months. Montagna and Calocchia were also killed in the same months.
It must be on account of the extra Christmas bonus that the hitmen get.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/10/16 04:57 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
So we might expect a few more molotovs and maybe another big hit around christmas lol

Gallo, Rizzutos, Di Maulo all got murdered during this time of the year.

November-December seem to be crappy months for mafiosi.

Maybe it's year-end overview and financials lol


The end of the mild weather means a break from major construction, so they have more time for other stuff. wink
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/10/16 06:03 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
So we might expect a few more molotovs and maybe another big hit around christmas lol

Gallo, Rizzutos, Di Maulo all got murdered during this time of the year.

November-December seem to be crappy months for mafiosi.

Maybe it's year-end overview and financials lol


Not to mention Montagna. The biggest names were all clipped in November. It's the high season.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/10/16 07:22 PM

Today is the anniversary of the Nick Sr./Di Maulo hits
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/10/16 10:06 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Also, on the old RD forum there was a poster with apparant inside knowledge who said that Arcadi had fallen out of favor with the Sicilians because he had arranged his own coke deals.


I remember that guy, but I don't think its enough to conclude he's now on the other side.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/11/16 12:11 AM

Originally Posted By: eurodave


Quebec's business registry lists a Giuseppe Franco as a principal for Il Tavolino, as well as listing some interrelated companies--one of the latter companies shows an Aurelio Franco as a principal for what appears to be a holding company for residential and commercial buildings. Il Tavolino and some of the other related companies, such as Billiard Colors Inc., are categorized in the registry as restaurants, night clubs, or establishments with video-lottery terminals (VLTs).
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/11/16 12:02 PM

Andrea 'Andrew' Scoppa arrested in hundred kilo cocaine seizure

http://gangstersoutt.blogspot.nl/2016/11/andrea-andrew-scoppa-arrested-in.html
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/17/16 11:02 PM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...uisitionnee.php

Translation:

The residence of Andrew Scoppa, influential chieftain of the Montreal Mafia, was raided by police this morning in the northwest of the island of Montreal, learned the Press .

According to our information, the operation, which began around 8 am, was conducted by investigators from the Joint Regional Squad (ERM) north shore, in collaboration with the SPVM. The raid, which took place in the northwest of the island of Montreal, was conducted along with a dozen others performed in homes and vehicles, also on the island of Montreal.

This would involve searches conducted as part of a narcotics investigation ongoing.

Recall that last week, La Presse revealed that Andrew Scoppa and two other individuals were arrested and released on October 26 as part of an investigation into the seizure of more than 100 kilos of cocaine.

According to sources, the drug was, in part at least, found in a car parked in the parking lot of a gym Tower Canadiens in Montreal West.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/16 06:28 AM

Quebec's 81s are believed to be the new top dogs in the province's organized-crime landscape.

Crime organisé: les Hells Angels ont détrôné la mafia

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ne-la-mafia.php
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/16 11:14 AM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Quebec's 81s are believed to be the new top dogs in the province's organized-crime landscape.

Crime organisé: les Hells Angels ont détrôné la mafia

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ne-la-mafia.php


Merci, we already saw this with guys like Piccirilli.

Despite the organizational upheaval of organized crime in Quebec, there is no animosity between bikers and mafiosi, as well as individuals of both groups come together regularly and work together, according to our sources, making the line between Hells Angels and mafia increasingly diffuse.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/16 11:52 AM

Could it be possible that the recent murders were in part initiated by the bikers and some Italians? What do you guys think.

I had mentioned recently that it had been relatively quiet since spagjolo6 got clipped.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/16 12:35 PM

I find it to be very possible. Most of the individuals that have mounted the greatest opposition to the Rizzuto's all have strong ties to the bikers.....Mirarchi, DeVito, Scoppa, Piccirilli(recently formed his own MC).
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/16 12:39 PM

I also forgot to mention the D'Amico's (ties to the Hells) from Granby, who started this fiasco back when Vito was arrested.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/16 12:50 PM

It shows the Bikers strength on the streets and their power in controlling the distribution. Like its deceptive, it may very well be that if you WANT to be a powerful mobster in Quebec, YOU GOTTA have a relationship with the bikers.

It ties into something Saviano touches on in 000. And also in John Roberts book. The more coke these people ship, the less money made per kilo. The distributors end up making way more money per kilo. In a weird way they kinda become just as, if not more important. This dynamic happened with the Mexicans.. Here another excerpt......

Now the Mexicans could aspire to have a seat at the business table too. That and more. Much more. That’s how it works in big companies too; the distributor often becomes the producer’s main competitor, and its earnings surpass the head company’s.


The dynamics are much more complicated than people make it out to be....
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/16 01:26 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
I also forgot to mention the D'Amico's (ties to the Hells) from Granby, who started this fiasco back when Vito was arrested.


Speaking of them the deported Luigi D'Amico started a few succesful restaurants in his home country. Here he is with his staff.

http://graffitinews.it/a-s-egidio-parte-la-catena-di-ristoranti-la-sera/
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/19/16 02:35 PM

Good find Hollander !
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/20/16 06:46 PM

This time, a different paper reporting what La Presse reported a few days ago.

Les Hells imposent une taxe de 10% | Le Journal de Montréal

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/11/19/les-hells-imposent-une-taxe-de-10
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/16 12:18 AM

It will be interesting to see how long this keeps up as I doubt the Italians will keep paying the bikers.

It will also be interesting to see who has the pull and influence within the mob to establish leadership
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/16 11:46 AM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
It will be interesting to see how long this keeps up as I doubt the Italians will keep paying the bikers.

It will also be interesting to see who has the pull and influence within the mob to establish leadership


To keep the HA happy they will probably pay them, enough money to do so. They don't want a confrontation.
Posted By: m2w

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/16 04:17 PM

i doubt italian mafia pay something to ha in montreal, italian mafia is clearly by far the strongest criminal group there, it imports even more drugs than ha, it has tons of shooters and made montreal a war-zone... honestly, canada is a joke, there is not anti-mafia law, no informants
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/16 04:28 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
It will be interesting to see how long this keeps up as I doubt the Italians will keep paying the bikers.

It will also be interesting to see who has the pull and influence within the mob to establish leadership


I just find there is something missing with this picture about the HA being in control.The journalist mentioned the Montreal mafia are no longer calling the shots but where does the Ontario Ndrangheta fit in this equation. Are we to conclude that this is a result of what was mentioned in the earlier articles that mentioned an alliance was taking place between HA & the Ontario Ndrangheta or is HA the sole head of the pyramid ? I just find these journalists keep us hanging and there is no follow up on the alledged alliance.
Posted By: m2w

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/16 04:34 PM

ha have nothing to do with the montreal war, it's an italian thing, in my opinion there are 2 strong factions killing eachother, 1 supported by the ndrangheta and the other by caruana- c untrera's
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/16 07:04 PM

Originally Posted By: m2w
ha have nothing to do with the montreal war, it's an italian thing, in my opinion there are 2 strong factions killing eachother, 1 supported by the ndrangheta and the other by caruana- c untrera's


Assuming that were true,weren't there be a stream of killings in Toronto among the Caruana/Cun trera and Ndrangheta. It wouldn't be limited to Montreal. I don't mean to put holes in your theory, I am just asking ?
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/16 07:34 PM

Originally Posted By: m2w
i doubt italian mafia pay something to ha in montreal, italian mafia is clearly by far the strongest criminal group there, it imports even more drugs than ha, it has tons of shooters and made montreal a war-zone... honestly, canada is a joke, there is not anti-mafia law, no informants


Many of the shooters are Haitians and police do have a lot of informants.

Ex Montreal Cop Tried To Sell Mafia Informants' List
CBC
Posted: 01/16/2012 9:11 pm EST Updated: 03/17/2012 5:12 am EDT

A retired Montreal police officer tried to sell a list of informants to the Mafia, according to information obtained by Radio-Canada.

After his retirement in January, the officer allegedly tried to sell the list for a six-figure sum.

Police said he was one of only two or three people who had access to the list.

Didier Deramond, of the Montreal police, said information was received in April 2011 through a wiretap investigation. That information led to the suspect's arrest in October, he said.

A search warrant was issued after his arrest, and the list of informants was seized.

Police said the identities have not been compromised.

No charges have been laid.

Deramond said the officer worked for Montreal police for more than 30 years.

A second person was arrested in connection with the case. Police said the investigation is ongoing.

-
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/16 08:49 PM

As much as we might believe the recent mafia war only included italian factions against each other, the biker component shouldnt be undermined. They were used and will continue to be a force as their geographical influence is far greater than the mafia or any ethnic gangs which are usually confined to large urban centers.

Certainly as we saw with the new table Vito put in place, bikers and gangs sat at the same table with the mafia and discussed, their importance has increased in the last decade.

It would be interesting to study the power dynamics between the 3 big crime groups operation in the area but the mafia seems weekened at the moment.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/16 10:26 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
As much as we might believe the recent mafia war only included italian factions against each other, the biker component shouldnt be undermined. They were used and will continue to be a force as their geographical influence is far greater than the mafia or any ethnic gangs which are usually confined to large urban centers.

Certainly as we saw with the new table Vito put in place, bikers and gangs sat at the same table with the mafia and discussed, their importance has increased in the last decade.

It would be interesting to study the power dynamics between the 3 big crime groups operation in the area but the mafia seems weekened at the moment.


+1
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/21/16 11:57 PM

Apart from small disputes,the HA and the mafia always respected each others territory.
When the bikers in Montreal had their wars in the 90's. Although Vito leaned more with HA,they chose the role of mediator between HA and the Rock Machine.They could of moved in and seek more control but chose not to. Now we are supposed to believe that HA are now in control and no questions asked. I am suspicious that there is something else going on here. Why would HA risk a possible war in the future with the mafia. All it takes is a few police raids on the HA to unbalance the scale and a war can break out again. Unless the Mafia or the Mafia dissidents decided to make an alliance with HA. If this is not the case then I find it remarkable that the HA were able to takeover without losing one MC member. It is too hard to believe.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/22/16 02:45 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Apart from small disputes,the HA and the mafia always respected each others territory.
When the bikers in Montreal had their wars in the 90's. Although Vito leaned more with HA,they chose the role of mediator between HA and the Rock Machine.They could of moved in and seek more control but chose not to. Now we are supposed to believe that HA are now in control and no questions asked. I am suspicious that there is something else going on here. Why would HA risk a possible war in the future with the mafia. All it takes is a few police raids on the HA to unbalance the scale and a war can break out again. Unless the Mafia or the Mafia dissidents decided to make an alliance with HA. If this is not the case then I find it remarkable that the HA were able to takeover without losing one MC member. It is too hard to believe.


I don't believe the Italians or other groups are paying the HA 10% because they have to but they want to have their support. They are equal partners for a very long time.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/22/16 03:00 AM

Originally Posted By: m2w
ha have nothing to do with the montreal war, it's an italian thing, in my opinion there are 2 strong factions killing eachother, 1 supported by the ndrangheta and the other by caruana- c untrera's


We have yet to see if thats true. It's nice to have an opinion and all and to voice it, but to say like you'd know for sure that the Bikers aren't involved in whats going on in Montreal nowadays, in some capacity, I think thats a bit of a reach. I also wouldn't say the Montreal Mafia is the strongest OC group in Montreal either, with so much in fighting going on now, and with the constant rise of the Hells even when they're leaders were jailed, and the consolidation they made with some of the black street gangs and turning them into HA subsets, I think the Biker gangs, mostly the Hells, are at least somewhat equal to the Montreal Mafia.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/23/16 11:50 AM

Sebastien Comtois, president of the Devils Ghosts of Montreal, a junior club of the Hells Angels, is among the individuals arrested yesterday in an operation to dismantle a drug trafficking network. The first chapter of Devils Ghosts was founded in 2012 and was sponsored by the influential member of the Hells Angels Salvatore Cazzetta and Sergio Piccirilli.
Posted By: m2w

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/23/16 03:28 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Assuming that were true,weren't there be a stream of killings in Toronto among the Caruana/Cun trera and Ndrangheta. It wouldn't be limited to Montreal. I don't mean to put holes in your theory, I am just asking ?


i think that the murders of verduci, calautti, the attempt to rocco di paola and others were carried out by caruana-c untrera's, so yes there were killings also in toronto
Posted By: m2w

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/23/16 03:30 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
Many of the shooters are Haitians and police do have a lot of informants.


according to who? there is not any evidence that the shooters are haitians, maybe a couple, but not many as you claim...
if they had so many informers they would know what's happen, the police seems to know almost nothing about the war
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/23/16 06:25 PM

Originally Posted By: m2w

if they had so many informers they would know what's happen, the police seems to know almost nothing about the war


The montreal ex-cop who killed himself had a list with 2,000 informants and undercover agents.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/23/16 07:06 PM

Originally Posted By: m2w
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Assuming that were true,weren't there be a stream of killings in Toronto among the Caruana/Cun trera and Ndrangheta. It wouldn't be limited to Montreal. I don't mean to put holes in your theory, I am just asking ?


i think that the murders of verduci, calautti, the attempt to rocco di paola and others were carried out by caruana-c untrera's, so yes there were killings also in toronto


Verduci got clipped by the Figliomeni brothers, according to Italian documents.

Calautti owed money to alot of people, including his own organization. Coluccio took on 200k in debt he owed to the Montreal group.
Posted By: m2w

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/24/16 03:29 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
The montreal ex-cop who killed himself had a list with 2,000 informants and undercover agents.


2.000? there are not even so many mafia members in montreal, i know there are not turncoats in canada, maybe yes they have some informants but they seem to know very little about the mafia war
Posted By: m2w

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/24/16 03:30 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Verduci got clipped by the Figliomeni brothers, according to Italian documents.


i doubt italian police knows about what's happening in canada
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/24/16 03:44 PM

Originally Posted By: m2w
Originally Posted By: Hollander
The montreal ex-cop who killed himself had a list with 2,000 informants and undercover agents.


2.000? there are not even so many mafia members in montreal, i know there are not turncoats in canada, maybe yes they have some informants but they seem to know very little about the mafia war


This are also informants in other circles montreal has a very diverse underworld like most major cities. Without them police can't make any cases against the mafia like we see the last ten years.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/24/16 05:16 PM

Originally Posted By: m2w
Originally Posted By: eurodave
Verduci got clipped by the Figliomeni brothers, according to Italian documents.


i doubt italian police knows about what's happening in canada


This news article mentions how Italian police knew.

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/toronto-on-brink-of-a-mob-war-italy-warns
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/24/16 07:13 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: m2w
Originally Posted By: eurodave
Verduci got clipped by the Figliomeni brothers, according to Italian documents.


i doubt italian police knows about what's happening in canada


This news article mentions how Italian police knew.

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/toronto-on-brink-of-a-mob-war-italy-warns


Better yet, everyone should see the Italian-language PDF found at http://www.strettoweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/COMUNICATO-ARRESTI-28.09.2015.pdf.

Pay particular attention to the bottom of p. 3 and the first four paragraphs of p. 4.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/24/16 09:59 PM

It can't be any clearer than that.

Good Find antimafia !
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/25/16 09:53 AM

Gotta read as much as you can......
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/25/16 10:49 AM

Another influential Hells Angel released.

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...03_section_POS4
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/25/16 04:00 PM

Beaches molotoved last night this was where colapelle got killed and a known hang out for de vito associates
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/25/16 04:26 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Beaches molotoved last night this was where colapelle got killed and a known hang out for de vito associates


That might rule out the Desjardins people then, who were allies with De Vito.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/25/16 05:01 PM

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/11/24/temoin-important-de-lattaque-au-cocktail-molotov-recherche

Important witness to the Cafe Bellrose molotov cocktail attack.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/25/16 10:17 PM

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/tony-papa-1.3862798

What the article does not mention, he is Moreno Gallo's brother-in-law.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/25/16 10:51 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/tony-papa-1.3862798

What the article does not mention, he is Moreno Gallo's brother-in-law.


Below is a link to a French-language article on the very same subject:

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1001...ups-de-montreal
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/26/16 04:15 PM

Originally Posted By: m2w
Originally Posted By: eurodave
Verduci got clipped by the Figliomeni brothers, according to Italian documents.


i doubt italian police knows about what's happening in canada


That's quite a ridiculous statement, you don't think they'd have insight through 'Ndrangheta members who are connected to other 'Ndrine members in Canada, namely the Siderno/Commisso group? Which is how they got that info in the first place.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/27/16 12:58 PM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...emi-liberte.php

Montreal Columbian that supplied HA with cocaine on condition release.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/30/16 05:46 AM

"Un mafioso condamné à 32 mois pour possession d'arme"

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ssion-darme.php
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 11/30/16 06:14 AM

Sounds like De Gregorio was either prepared to do some work, or was protecting himself in that rough climate in the Montreal underworld. I think it was the latter.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/02/16 02:30 AM

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12...vre-a-la-police

Translation:

MAXIME DELAND
Thursday, December 1, 2016 5:02 p.m.
Update Thursday, December 1, 2016 5:02 p.m.
The Hells- Guy "Malin" Rodrigue, who was among the list of 10 most wanted criminals in Quebec, was arrested on Thursday, confirmed the Sûreté du Québec.
The 59 year old man was wanted since SharQc operation, conducted in April 2009. Rodrigue, a member of the Hells Angels chapter in Sherbrooke since the mid-80s, was particularly wanted for murder, gangsterism and drug trafficking .
Between 1994 and 2002 he plotted 22 murders and had personally ordered several in order to maintain or increase the territory of the Hells Angels in Quebec," police said.
Guy Rodrigue has delivered himself Thursday to police. He appeared in the afternoon at the courthouse in Montreal, but the Sûreté du Québec was not able to say what charges were brought against him.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/02/16 02:39 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment

Between 1994 and 2002 he plotted 22 murders and had personally ordered several in order to maintain or increase the territory of the Hells Angels in Quebec," police said.
Guy Rodrigue has delivered himself Thursday to police. He appeared in the afternoon at the courthouse in Montreal, but the Sûreté du Québec was not able to say what charges were brought against him.


Those french bikers are on another level.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/02/16 03:06 AM

Just my 2 cents montreal is up for grabs. The rizzutto bonanno crew had there run for 50+years. And it worked its over. Seems when joe massino the boss of all was exposed as a rat in 2006 it all went down hill since
Agree or disagree?
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/02/16 04:59 AM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: Ciment

Between 1994 and 2002 he plotted 22 murders and had personally ordered several in order to maintain or increase the territory of the Hells Angels in Quebec," police said.
Guy Rodrigue has delivered himself Thursday to police. He appeared in the afternoon at the courthouse in Montreal, but the Sûreté du Québec was not able to say what charges were brought against him.


Those french bikers are on another level.


Most of those murders were probably committed during the biker war between the Hells Angels and the Rock Machine.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/02/16 05:17 AM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...92_section_POS1

Translation: Daniel Renaud LaPresse
The Hells Angels Guy Rodrigue, who had been on the run since Operation SharQc more than seven years ago and was on the list of the ten most wanted criminals in Quebec, was arrested this afternoon.

Rodrigue, 59, gave himself up, following negotiations between his lawyer and the police. He appeared this afternoon at the Montreal courthouse. He remains detained and returned to court on 5 January. He is currently facing the same charges as other leaders who were deposed against on the day of the famous police strike on April 15, 2009. He is accused of 22 counts of murder and counts of conspiracy, drug trafficking and gangsterism.

We do not know what Rodrigue, who belongs to the Sherbrooke chapter, did during his long journey on the run. There are indications that he has spent an indefinite period in Mexico. According to some reports, it was because he could no longer be on the run that the biker surrendered to the police.

Guy Rodrigue is one of the most influential members of the Hells Angels in Quebec, according to the police. He would be involved in the facet of the organization's money laundering. He is close to Charles Huneault, an associate of the Hells Angels arrested in 2014 in Operation Hantise de la Sûreté du Québec and considered by this one as a major usury lender and recycler of the proceeds of crime.

Let us recall that a few weeks ago, the public prosecutor withdrew all the charges against seven other Hells Angels on the run for more than seven years. However, the charges were not withdrawn against Rodrigue and another fugitive rider, Claude Gauthier. The latter is the last Hells Angels who has not yet been arrested since SharQc. According to our information, the charges have not been withdrawn against Rodrigue and Gauthier because the prosecution would like to bring against them the informer Dayle Fredette
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/02/16 07:39 PM


Two suspicious deaths in Vaudreuil-Dorion could be linked to biker gangs.
CTV Montreal
Published Thursday, December 1, 2016 6:55PM EST
Last Updated Friday, December 2, 2016 2:25PM EST
One of the two men killed in a double homicide in Vaudreuil-Dorion Thursday is Joseph Fluet, who reports say was linked to biker gang The Rock Machine.
Police resumed their investigation Friday morning into the shooting deaths of two men. They confirmed Friday that one of the men is Fluet, who was named in a 2014 report in La Presse as linked to The Rock Machine. The report said Fluet had been arrested in along with other gang members for possession of prohibited arms.
The body of one of the victims was found badly injured shortly after 1 p.m. Thursday on Alstonvale Way near Harwood.
Shortly thereafter, police investigating the scene discovered a second man, also badly hurt. Both men were pronounced dead in hospital.
Sûreté du Québec spokesperson Ingrid Asselin said the two men were both in their 40s. Fluet was 45. While police said one of the men was linked to biker gangs, but they would not confirm which gang.
Police do not have any description of any potential vehicles or attackers involved in the deaths.
The major crimes unit spent the night at the scene began investigating again Friday morning.
Neighbour Jackie Nadeau said she was startled by the gunshots.
“I was on the phone with a friend. I heard the gunshots from my apartment. I ran upstairs because it startled me, and I said it sounded like gunshots and I came up and looked over in that direction because that’s where I thought it came from and I said, ‘Oh, I must be crazy’ everything was quiet. There was nothing. There weren’t any people around or a car around or anything moving on the street. It was peaceful,” she said.
The investigation continues.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/02/16 07:52 PM

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2014/03...dre-leur-retour

Eric Thibault
ERIC THIBAULT
Monday, March 31, 2014 8:09 p.m.
Update Tuesday, April 1, 2014 0:24
A surprising discovery of the police in a warehouse north of the island of Montreal on Saturday suggests a return to Quebec of the Rock Machine, the sworn enemies of the Hells Angels against which they fought a war that has killed 160 between 1994 and 2002.
The Journal has learned that the Quebec provincial police seized three jackets bearing the image of the Rock Machine - called "patches" or "colors", in the jargon of the police - and for members of the motorcycle gang, inside of a warehouse Balmoral Street, in the borough of Saint-Laurent.
Threat
The Rock Machine are yet disappeared from the province for more than ten years, although Canadian members exhibited their colors a few times in bars of downtown Montreal, in 2011 and 2012.

SQ refused to confirm our information or elaborate on the meaning of this unexpected discovery yesterday. Sergeant Anne Mathieu said that the search was conducted from an investigation for threats in a commercial dispute.
"The complainant filed a complaint in mid-March. He had to invest thousands of dollars in a project with a man of Laval but that did not materialize as planned. The suspect allegedly tried to obtain money under threat and with the help of intermediaries, "recounted the spokesman for the SQ.
Saturday, officers from the SQ Regional Investigation Division arrested Yan Seguin, 25, of Montreal West, in this case. Still detained, he appeared to face a charge of threats yesterday.
An arrest warrant has also been issued to the place of Joseph Fluet, 42, of Laval, to answer the same charge.
defectors
Most tenors of the Rock Machine have joined the Hells Angels after the bloody war between the two gangs.
Salvatore Cazzetta, one of the founders of the Rock Machine in 1985, Paul "Sasquatch" Porter, who then led the Nomads chapter of the Hells in Ontario and Jean Judes Faucher were the lot.
The latter's brother, Frédéric Faucher, serving 23 years in prison for having ordered the hired killer Gérald Gallant for the killings of a dozen allies of the Hells Angels.
Their followers had been arrested and sentenced to long terms in the margins of the police operation Amigo, conducted in 2002 by the SQ.
Nevertheless, the biker assured a presence in Ontario - where six of its members were killed in an internal purge in 2007 - and Manitoba, where the RCMP has dealt him a blow it a year ago, when Dilemma of the drug operation with the arrest of 11 bikers.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/02/16 11:50 PM

Biker related news has increased alot lately, murders and such while the same cant be said about the mob

Will be interesting to see how things play out
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/03/16 12:53 AM

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...audreuil-dorion

More on the Rock Machine shooting.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/03/16 12:59 AM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Biker related news has increased alot lately, murders and such while the same cant be said about the mob

Will be interesting to see how things play out


Yes, interesting observation. Montreal mafia is very quiet these days.

This Rock Machine shooting maybe internal but if HA is behind this shooting we may see a new biker war brewing and new alliances being made.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/04/16 01:05 AM

The Rock Machine has connections to what is left of the Cotronis.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/04/16 04:13 AM

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12...un-rock-machine

A former informer riddled with bullets.

The Rock Machine Joseph Fluet, alias Eric Lefebvre, had also worked for the Hells Angels and the police


Friday, December 2, 2016 8:54 p.m. Eric Thibeau
Update Friday, December 2, 2016 8:54 p.m.
A member of the Rock Machine riddled with bullets Thursday in Vaudreuil-Dorion was back in the unforgiving environment of the bikers after having failed as an informer for the police.
Joseph "Fuego" Fluet, who began his criminal career as a henchman of the Hells Angels, had long known that there was a price on his head, and that even if he was living under a new identity for seven years, learned the Journal .
Joseph Fluet
COURTESY PHOTO
Joseph Fluet
In April 2001, who spent the first 38 years of his life under the name of Éric Lefebvre told the Journal de Québec he was blacklisted by the Hells for having had a "one night stand" with a blonde of another member of the motorcycle gang.

At the time, he was "striker" of Damners MC - a farm club of the Hells in the Quebec City area - and he had been arrested for his participation in the war waged for the Hells vs Rock Machine.
"Never informer ..."
He said that the Sûreté du Québec offered him to become an informer and to denounce his accomplices to justice.
"I'll never be an informer. It does not tempts me to die at 31 years, "he proclaimed then.
But Lefebvre changed his mind a few weeks later when investigators from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in New Brunswick advised him that he would be accused of setting fire to a bar in Moncton.
They offered him to collaborate with them in exchange for a new identity, police protection and financial compensation.
He agreed, but soon got in trouble after admitting his other crimes and was sentenced to seven years in prison.
He committed perjury under oath in court, refused to return to testify for the Crown during another trial and even sued the RCMP for breach of contract claiming one million dollars.
In 2009, he returned to Quebec on leaving the penitentiary. It did not take long to be re-handcuff. It was under the name of Joseph Fluet that he appeared in court and was sentenced.
A real headache
Nicknamed "Fuego" (Fire) in the underworld, Fluet was pinched again in a case of extortion and firearms in 2014.
During the investigation, the Sûreté du Québec (SQ) made a surprise entry in a warehouse in the borough of Saint-Laurent: thry found black and white jackets brand new with the emblems of the Rock Machine, that were believed to be missing since the end of the biker war.
Fluet was one of the new members of this gang that he fought for.
He had just served two years in prison when a shooter made him one of the victims of a double murder that has the signature of organized crime Thursday in a wooded area of &#8203;&#8203;Vaudreuil-Dorion.
The case is a puzzle for investigators. Not for the fact Fluet had many enemies, but because the SQ do not know who is the other victim, a man in his forties who had no identification on him.
Posted By: Marcow

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/04/16 04:49 AM

Does anyone of you believe that the New York families have something to do with the preconditions in Montreal?

I mean different Ndrangheta clans have their fingers in the game.

It speaks when you look at the global development very much for it.

The Siderno Group is among the largest and biggest in the cocaine business in North America I would say almost the largest. The commissos the coluccios and other clans. Perhaps also the rest of the cotronis, but they are not as rich and powerful as the siderno group.

These families are rich, powerful and operate all over the world.

At the moment they are on everyone's lips. Italy Canda Australia and in half of Europe.

What would also interest me is the role of the caruana and the [BadWord] family.

Have he any contact with the siderno group? Have the New york familys contacts with the siderno group?

The new york mafia have contacts with the ndrangheta clan Aquino, which is also associated with the coluccios and the commissos.


The New York families have I still think of a certain power in america but worldwide?

Apart from the Gambinos and Genovese, the American Mafia has absolutely nothing to say in the world.

The question for me is how does it look at these 2 families?
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/04/16 12:56 PM

Two people sought by the Sûreté du Québec in connection with the double murder occurred on Thursday in Vaudreuil-Dorion. Investigators are asking the public's help to trace Richard Hunt, 38, and Melanie Binette, 28 years.

Investigators want to question them in connection with the murders of Joseph Fluet, 45, and Steven Lamarsh, 38. Last Thursday, the victims' bodies were found on a plot of Montée Alstonvale in Vaudreuil. According to information obtained by La Presse , Joseph Fluet - his baptismal name Éric Lefebvre - has been or was still a member of the Rock Machine of the 13th legion.

Richard Hunt, who lives in Vaudreuil, could circulate on a 2011 Dodge Ram vehicle, four-door, pale and gray G54 MKS registered.

Any information that may help locate Richard Hunt or Melanie Binette can be transmitted confidentially to the Central criminal information of the Sûreté du Québec at 1 800 659-4264.

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...tion_ECRAN1POS2
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/04/16 12:59 PM

No I don't think there is any American involvement in Montreal anymore.

As for the Mafia up there, it will be quiet until Rizzuto gets out and Sollecito beats cancer or dies one.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/04/16 02:13 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
No I don't think there is any American involvement in Montreal anymore.

As for the Mafia up there, it will be quiet until Rizzuto gets out and Sollecito beats cancer or dies one.


No idea, but an acting boss of the Bonannos was involved in the war so there are links to NY.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/06/16 12:10 AM

Only because he was from America. He couldn't even step foot in America legally again so the links end there. He held no sway in the Bonanno's anymore much less NY or America.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/06/16 12:20 AM

Originally Posted By: Marcow
Does anyone of you believe that the New York families have something to do with the preconditions in Montreal?

I mean different Ndrangheta clans have their fingers in the game.

It speaks when you look at the global development very much for it.

The Siderno Group is among the largest and biggest in the cocaine business in North America I would say almost the largest. The commissos the coluccios and other clans. Perhaps also the rest of the cotronis, but they are not as rich and powerful as the siderno group.

These families are rich, powerful and operate all over the world.

At the moment they are on everyone's lips. Italy Canda Australia and in half of Europe.

What would also interest me is the role of the caruana and the [BadWord] family.

Have he any contact with the siderno group? Have the New york familys contacts with the siderno group?

The new york mafia have contacts with the ndrangheta clan Aquino, which is also associated with the coluccios and the commissos.


The New York families have I still think of a certain power in america but worldwide?

Apart from the Gambinos and Genovese, the American Mafia has absolutely nothing to say in the world.

The question for me is how does it look at these 2 families?


No.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/06/16 06:25 PM

Originally Posted By: Marcow
Does anyone of you believe that the New York families have something to do with the preconditions in Montreal?


There's no evidence of involvement of New York with the current situation, but with the preconditions absolutely. It was Massino's testimony that put Rizzuto in jail which led to chaos in the Montreal underworld. And it escalated when Montagna became involved. This is not even debatable, it is a fact.

Quote:
What would also interest me is the role of the caruana and the [BadWord] family.

Have he any contact with the siderno group? Have the New york familys contacts with the siderno group?


Yes, and there is evidence to support it.

Quote:
The New York families have I still think of a certain power in america but worldwide?


Not really. The late IvyLeague (as a poster) stated that the New York families have become primarily a local enterprise.

Quote:
Apart from the Gambinos and Genovese, the American Mafia has absolutely nothing to say in the world.


Not even these families have much world wide sway anymore. And besides, the New York families never were as active on a global scale as let's say the 'ndrangheta.

Quote:
The question for me is how does it look at these 2 families?


Pretty stabile.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 12:36 AM

I also think the situation in Montreal has changed in a few years from a strict mafia tradition to urban gangsterism like we also see in for example Napels.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 01:55 AM

Things in Montreal just got very interesting if not downright confusing.

Le resto incendié avait accueilli des mafieux

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12/06/le-resto-incendie-avait-accueilli-des-mafieux
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 03:00 AM

At least we know the Cotronis and Violis are still connected. Very little is known about Michel Cotroni.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 03:16 AM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
At least we know the Cotronis and Violis are still connected. Very little is known about Michel Cotroni.


One of Frank's brothers was named "Michel," who, according to one of Frank's obituaries from 2004, might have left Montreal a number of years earlier because he was not part of that world, i.e., the underworld.

There is probably another Michel Cotroni in the family.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 03:44 AM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Things in Montreal just got very interesting if not downright confusing.

Le resto incendié avait accueilli des mafieux

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12/06/le-resto-incendie-avait-accueilli-des-mafieux


Very interesting indeed.
The Violi's revenge plot theory, with the backing of the Ontario Ndrangheta, now seems to be more plausible.
-The owner of the restaurant connection with Dany DeGregorio from the DeVito clan.
- Cotroni's and Violi's meeting last October at that same restaurant.
-The Violi brothers being in Montreal the week before Nick Rizzuto sr. was killed.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 04:14 AM

I believe he is Frank Cotroni's son. He had six children,five boys were Nicodemo,Jimmy,Frank Jr.,Paolo and Michel.

Frank Cotroni did have a brother Michel but he is deceased, it is most likely one of his sons.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 04:39 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
I believe he is Frank Cotroni's son. He had six children,five boys were Nicodemo,Jimmy,Frank Jr.,Paolo and Michel.

Frank Cotroni did have a brother Michel but he is deceased, it is most likely one of his sons.


You're right, Ciment, about Frank's having a son Michel.

There's a pic of Michel on p. 2 of the PDF to which I've linked below (file size is about 8 MB).

La Presse article dated September 27, 1985
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 11:37 AM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: Ciment
I believe he is Frank Cotroni's son. He had six children,five boys were Nicodemo,Jimmy,Frank Jr.,Paolo and Michel.

Frank Cotroni did have a brother Michel but he is deceased, it is most likely one of his sons.


You're right, Ciment, about Frank's having a son Michel.

There's a pic of Michel on p. 2 of the PDF to which I've linked below (file size is about 8 MB).

http://collections.banq.qc.ca:8008/lapresse/src/cahiers/1985/09/27/01/82812_1985092701.pdf


Great find! Seems like most of the brothers have followed in their father's foot steps. Paolo was killed by the hitman Gallant in 1998.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 01:30 PM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ur-la-mafia.php

Salvatore Scoppa making the news again.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 01:39 PM

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12/07/une-guerre-judiciaire-peu-commune

Condo's where the mafia and Hells were involved.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 03:58 PM

Lots of interesting information lately but in a misty fog it could seem possible that remnants of the violi cotroni and friends have made some space for themselves lately and will continue to do.

The Cotroni-Violi meeting at the resto is super interesting as is the black dude hired by Scoppa who could of potentially murdered Campellone.

The number of people involved, alliances and such is hard to follow.

One things for sure, all the action happens in Montreal

Time will tell...

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/12/06/bu...lli-des-mafieux
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 06:04 PM

Linguini Restaurant fire may hold clues to Montreal mafia war

http://aboutthemafia.com/linguini-restaurant-fire-may-hold-clues-to-montreal-mafia-war
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/07/16 11:32 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ur-la-mafia.php

Salvatore Scoppa making the news again.



Jesus Christ, that dude's head!
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 12:30 AM

Damn, things are definitely getting interesting
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 02:04 AM

Maybe just a coincidence but the murder of spagnolo and this linguini meeting were within the same time frame
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 02:14 AM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Maybe just a coincidence but the murder of spagnolo and this linguini meeting were within the same time frame


I remember an article from 2012 that said Domenic Violi is now in power in Canada and is cleaning up. That is who the people in Quebec think it is. They said it was in retaliation for the murder of Paolo Violi and for pushing them out of Montreal in the first place.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 03:46 AM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Maybe just a coincidence but the murder of spagnolo and this linguini meeting were within the same time frame


Yes it was, the Journal de Montreal mentions that this meeting at Linguini took place at the beginning of October and Spagnolo was killed on the Oct. 15. It's seems that whenever the Violi's are in town, some killing occurs thereafter. I noticed the same with Mirarchi when he would meet with the Ontario clans.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 03:53 AM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ur-la-mafia.php

Salvatore Scoppa making the news again.



Jesus Christ, that dude's head!


Now that his brother might be going to jail, I guess he has to carry the load.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 12:39 PM

Speaking of the Violis I think they are the cousins of these two brothers who were involved in drug trafficking to the USA.

Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 03:57 PM

Looking back over the last year and timeline of events, it's interesting to note how things have changed.

On one hand, we've been hearing more and more about the Scoppa's and the rise of the bikers, as evidenced by recent arrests and murders, on the other hands we've seen 3 important figures in the Rizzuto loyalists get killed (Giordano, Sollecito, Spagnolo). These were older senior members.

A few months ago, journalist Cedillot had mentioned some sort of alliance brewing between bikers and the calabrians, could the recent meeting at Linguini be an indication of that?

The Lapresse article mentioned that some italian mafiosi were paying the bikers a tax, maybe the new structure put in place has enabled this.

If im not mistaken, the Cotronis have always been extremely close to the french-canadian community and by extension the bikers.

Most likely, the criminal map is being re-drawn within the city.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 04:17 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment


In English:

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/nation...2920/story.html
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 05:28 PM

Thanks Hollander!
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 06:19 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave

If im not mistaken, the Cotronis have always been extremely close to the french-canadian community and by extension the bikers.

Most likely, the criminal map is being re-drawn within the city.


They said the Cotroni group was finished after the death of Frank in 2004, but it seems like they are still doing their own thing, they are deeply rooted in Quebec culture. I wouldn't besuprised if there is still a structure in place.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 07:59 PM

Frank Cotroni wasn't even a force in his later years, especially after his last release from prison. I also wouldn't jump to conclusions and assume the Cotroni group has all of a sudden regrouped, and become a force within the Montreal Mafia like old times. If there is some newly consolidated Cotroni group, I'd place it in the same group as the typical factions. Meaning it's group comprised of other Italian Canadian & French Canadian criminals moreso than Cotronis themselves. In other words, I simply don't believe there is anything at this point to go on that leads to them suddenly being a standalone faction.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 08:31 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Frank Cotroni wasn't even a force in his later years, especially after his last release from prison. I also wouldn't jump to conclusions and assume the Cotroni group has all of a sudden regrouped, and become a force within the Montreal Mafia like old times. If there is some newly consolidated Cotroni group, I'd place it in the same group as the typical factions. Meaning it's group comprised of other Italian Canadian & French Canadian criminals moreso than Cotronis themselves. In other words, I simply don't believe there is anything at this point to go on that leads to them suddenly being a standalone faction.


Despite the power shift, Frank Cotroni appeared to maintain
considerable influence in Montreal's underworld.
In July 2002, he was still described in police
intelligence reports as "an important person in the Montreal
Italian Mafia and in Canada."
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 08:48 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Frank Cotroni wasn't even a force in his later years, especially after his last release from prison. I also wouldn't jump to conclusions and assume the Cotroni group has all of a sudden regrouped, and become a force within the Montreal Mafia like old times. If there is some newly consolidated Cotroni group, I'd place it in the same group as the typical factions. Meaning it's group comprised of other Italian Canadian & French Canadian criminals moreso than Cotronis themselves. In other words, I simply don't believe there is anything at this point to go on that leads to them suddenly being a standalone faction.


Frank Cotroni was a force to be reckoned with in the 80s and inherited the so called Calabrian faction from his brother while Di Maulo, who was his protege, inherited it from him. Di Maulo married into the Cotroni family through his daughter and he took the Cotroni sons under his wing. So the Cotroni-Di Maulo faction (the old Cotroni-Violi group) never really ceased to exist up until this day.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/08/16 09:58 PM

Correct Sonny, they just operated in the shadows of the Rizzutos.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/09/16 12:51 PM

Desjardins and De Vito associate charged with importing cocaine

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12...is-arrestations
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/09/16 05:39 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Frank Cotroni wasn't even a force in his later years, especially after his last release from prison. I also wouldn't jump to conclusions and assume the Cotroni group has all of a sudden regrouped, and become a force within the Montreal Mafia like old times. If there is some newly consolidated Cotroni group, I'd place it in the same group as the typical factions. Meaning it's group comprised of other Italian Canadian & French Canadian criminals moreso than Cotronis themselves. In other words, I simply don't believe there is anything at this point to go on that leads to them suddenly being a standalone faction.


Despite the power shift, Frank Cotroni appeared to maintain
considerable influence in Montreal's underworld.
In July 2002, he was still described in police
intelligence reports as "an important person in the Montreal
Italian Mafia and in Canada."


In '00 period before he died in '04, which are the "later years" I'm referring to, Cotroni wasn't much of a factor in the Montreal underworld, this is at least according to The Northern Connection & Peter Edwards. Not saying it's facts, but there's no reason to assume Edwards wouldn't have an idea. A law enforcement officer from the time is quoted as saying "he's slowed down quite a bit. The organization is in tatters, if you want to call it an organization." This officer is unnamed however, and I don't know which organization he's referring to, most likely the Cotroni group itself, meaning the direct group whom was under Cotroni & his brother themselves. He definitely stayed in contact with various undesirables though, I won't deny that, which was his reason for going back to prison in '02 on a parole violation, meeting with a man who went on to meet with old Cotroni associates. I believe he even released a cookbook during this period, I wonder how guys would've felt about that. It's not exactly writing a memoir but who knows.

Chapter 28 of the aforementioned book details the murder of Franks son Paul in '98. There's another quote by another unnamed member of law enforcement, granted, but the rumors were to them that the killers did a sort of risk assessment before they killed the kid and they supposedly determined "They (Frank's Crime Family?) didn't have the clout in place..."; Meaning the "old Cotroni group" of Frank's didn't have the clout to avenge the death of his own son. These were supposedly bikers, as rumors were he was selling diluted cocaine to biker gangs. Again, rumors, but again Edwards was also a reporter for these groups specifically, and this specific book is usually referenced when sometimes the Cotroni's come up in other places. But hey, he could be wrong, I don't suspect him to be right about everything.


As far as the current status of the immediate group, I think Frank's son Francesco is still around, he served time for murder before, and if he isn't in prison I can see him being the representation for the "Cotroni group", I guess in the same way Leonardo would be for the "Rizzuto group", so I could be wrong about they're current place within the Montreal milieu.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/10/16 02:28 AM

I believe Nicodemo is Frank's oldest son, who is technically the family's patriarch. I'm not sure, but I vaguegly remember reading somewhere that Francisco was out of the game. Perhaps this Michel is now representing the group since he was named along with Domenico Violi as attending that meeting.

I think, if true, a clash between the Rizzutos and Cotronis had to happen at some point. I'd say it was even inevitable given the history.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/10/16 02:40 AM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
I believe Nicodemo is Frank's oldest son, who is technically the family's patriarch. I'm not sure, but I vaguegly remember reading somewhere that Francisco was out of the game. Perhaps this Michel is now representing the group since he was named along with Domenico Violi as attending that meeting.

I think, if true, a clash between the Rizzutos and Cotronis had to happen at some point. I'd say it was even inevitable given the history.


Would be nice to see a list of the other 18 attendees.
Posted By: Marcow

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/10/16 02:57 AM

I Think some of the other attendees are members of the Ndrangheta in Ontario or some men with contact to the Ndrangheta Guys.

I think not that only the cotronis and violis have the finger in the game in Montreal in future. In the background are other Groups. Full Calabrians if you know what I mean.

Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/10/16 03:45 AM

Wow its cold in mass tonight like 17. So i can only imagine up there. Makes perfect sense just old scores being settled 30+yrs later. I being in the usa think it deffintly started in 2006when it was reported massino flipped and the whole montreal bonanno/rizzuto family has been whacked out. These guys fathers who were killed probaly on orders from nyc in the 70tys said you know what fuck them and there rat boss vitos gone lets kill everyone else standing behind him.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/10/16 03:46 AM

They won.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/10/16 08:48 PM

By the time Massino flipped, the speculation was that the Rizzuto's were no longer under the Bonanno's anyway. Idk about that anymore, but even if that isn't true, your line about the Montreal Bonannos/Rizzutos being wiped out is a bit inaccurate. Suppose the Rizzutos did get upset with Massino after the whole Sciascia thing, and stopped answering to Massino, the criminal group itself, existed and regaining strength even until the day Vito died. After that, they still merely existed in the criminal world (I don't know about thrived) under Leonardo Rizzuto & Stefano Sollecito. IF that isn't true, then the Montreal Bonannos still existed even after Massino flipped, as Cicale reports of Montreal kicking up to Basciano & Tony Urso (D'Urso?), then you have the whole Montagna connection, him being the literal link to the old Sciascia NY crew and there still being a link to the Bonannos & the Montreal group. Long story short, what I'm saying is, the Montreal Bonanno/Rizzuto group was never "whacked out" (at least maybe up until now) and those links and supposed testimony proves that Massino wasn't crucial to their survival. And clearly things that occurred before Massino's era is proving to have been the Rizzuto's ultimate downfall, NOT Joey Massino and him flipping.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/11/16 02:07 AM

It's just that most of the Montreal Bonanno crew members are now dead. Rizzuto, Di Maulo, Renda, Arcuri, Gallo and even Montagna. It is however possible that the Cotronis are still in contact with New York and have their support. The historical ties between the Cotronis and Bonannos were strong.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/11/16 06:30 PM

Yea the Rizzuto's thrived without the Bonanno's, they might have needed their strength early on but they probably quadrupled their money and strength in Canada without New York's help. That was proven as Rizzuto was at his height during the 2000's it seems. No telling where they would be had Vito not gone away to Supermax and gotten shitty health care it seems. And no telling what Vito was still worth when he died. Just look at his deal with Magi when he brought in help to pay for it and bought five of those condos for a $1 a piece. He probably could have netted more than the 1.7 they sold for, that's what we know about. The drug numbers are probably out of this world, as we seen Desjardins proved they were worth fighting over.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/11/16 08:01 PM

I think the key link between the two families nowadays is the drugtrade with the Bonnanos as customers.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/11/16 10:00 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: antimafia


Two pages back I posted a link to Daniel Renaud's October 4 article about the Solid Gold attacks. Here's the story link in case you haven't read the article:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-criminels.php

According to the article, a source revealed that after Gallo's murder, Solid Gold passed into Stefano Sollecito's hands. The article also mentions that this information has not been corroborated by police. If the source's information is accurate, maybe one or more people close to Gallo were behind the attacks for a number of reasons, e.g., anger over Gallo's murder, resentment arising from losing the establishment.

If the information isn't accurate, the attacks may have been committed by people who were upset with Gallo's having sided with Montagna.

Toward the end of the article is the suggestion that because of the Solid Gold attacks, law enforcement will be looking into whether and how the murders of Rocco Sollecito and Moreno Gallo are related.


Yeah, I read that article (I rarely miss any) but I forgot about it stating that it had transitioned to Sollecito. It seems to me that Rocco Sollecito's murder could rather be linked to Giordano than Gallo, but who knows. Gallo had a small army of his own I believe. I still wonder where Mucci stood in all of this. Based on tapes of the Consenza club it looked like that Mucci was with Gallo back then. But based on information from Renaud, Mucci had supposedly distanced himself from Gallo during the take-over attempt because he chose to be neutral. Do you happen to have more information of Mucci's relationship with Gallo? I know that Mucci was in charge of a crew who where distributing coke, but I think that he was Gallo's second-in-command. Also, I ignored your advice and read your post in its entirety. ;) 


Sorry for only getting around to answering you now.

On September 26, 2012, Éric Vecchio, a police officer with the SPVM, where his title is lieutenant-détective, testified before the Charbonneau Commission inquiry (the CEIC). The transcript of his testimony will be found at

https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.ceic.gouv.qc.ca/fileadmin/Fichiers_client/fichiers/Transcriptions/2012-09/Transcription_audience_CEIC_2012-09-26.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwisnrCSjO3QAhUBw2MKHTm3A88QFggaMAA&usg=AFQjCNFg4WCbpeWWMyieIR6D0wRYsq9Xqw&sig2=lQO1HKjyxaZI9qd5OGI6NA

or at

https://www.ceic.gouv.qc.ca/fileadmin/Fi...2012-09-26.pdf.

At least one of these links should work.

Below is an excerpt from the transcript.

Q. Et également à l'instar de monsieur Moreno Gallo il faisait partie, il est calabrais?

R. Lui aussi il est calabrais, très proche de monsieur Di Maulo et très proche aussi avec le départ de monsieur Rizzuto, il y a toujours été dans l'entourage, là, des peut-être supposés prétendants au titre. Monsieur Mucci pendant un bout de temps a été, les rumeurs courait que c'est lui qui allait devenir la tête du réseau, la tête de l'organisation, ce qui était assez, tant qu'à moi assez farfelu, là.

Q. [419] Pour?

Parce que monsieur Mucci n'a jamais, n'a jamais occupé des, des postes clés dans le crime organisé italien à Montréal. Il a toujours été considéré comme un subalterne et non pas une tête dirigeante.
Donc son lien avec monsieur Di Maulo le laisse...

Donc monsieur Mucci a toujours été un peu dans l'ombre de monsieur Di Maulo. Donc le, le titre était plus ou moins farfelu.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/12/16 12:26 AM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: antimafia


Two pages back I posted a link to Daniel Renaud's October 4 article about the Solid Gold attacks. Here's the story link in case you haven't read the article:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...s-criminels.php

According to the article, a source revealed that after Gallo's murder, Solid Gold passed into Stefano Sollecito's hands. The article also mentions that this information has not been corroborated by police. If the source's information is accurate, maybe one or more people close to Gallo were behind the attacks for a number of reasons, e.g., anger over Gallo's murder, resentment arising from losing the establishment.

If the information isn't accurate, the attacks may have been committed by people who were upset with Gallo's having sided with Montagna.

Toward the end of the article is the suggestion that because of the Solid Gold attacks, law enforcement will be looking into whether and how the murders of Rocco Sollecito and Moreno Gallo are related.


Yeah, I read that article (I rarely miss any) but I forgot about it stating that it had transitioned to Sollecito. It seems to me that Rocco Sollecito's murder could rather be linked to Giordano than Gallo, but who knows. Gallo had a small army of his own I believe. I still wonder where Mucci stood in all of this. Based on tapes of the Consenza club it looked like that Mucci was with Gallo back then. But based on information from Renaud, Mucci had supposedly distanced himself from Gallo during the take-over attempt because he chose to be neutral. Do you happen to have more information of Mucci's relationship with Gallo? I know that Mucci was in charge of a crew who where distributing coke, but I think that he was Gallo's second-in-command. Also, I ignored your advice and read your post in its entirety. ;) 


Sorry for only getting around to answering you now.

On September 26, 2012, Éric Vecchio, a police officer with the SPVM, where his title is lieutenant-détective, testified before the Charbonneau Commission inquiry (the CEIC). The transcript of his testimony will be found at

https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.ceic.gouv.qc.ca/fileadmin/Fichiers_client/fichiers/Transcriptions/2012-09/Transcription_audience_CEIC_2012-09-26.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwisnrCSjO3QAhUBw2MKHTm3A88QFggaMAA&usg=AFQjCNFg4WCbpeWWMyieIR6D0wRYsq9Xqw&sig2=lQO1HKjyxaZI9qd5OGI6NA

or at

https://www.ceic.gouv.qc.ca/fileadmin/Fi...2012-09-26.pdf.

At least one of these links should work.

Below is an excerpt from the transcript.

Q. Et également à l'instar de monsieur Moreno Gallo il faisait partie, il est calabrais?

R. Lui aussi il est calabrais, très proche de monsieur Di Maulo et très proche aussi avec le départ de monsieur Rizzuto, il y a toujours été dans l'entourage, là, des peut-être supposés prétendants au titre. Monsieur Mucci pendant un bout de temps a été, les rumeurs courait que c'est lui qui allait devenir la tête du réseau, la tête de l'organisation, ce qui était assez, tant qu'à moi assez farfelu, là.

Q. [419] Pour?

Parce que monsieur Mucci n'a jamais, n'a jamais occupé des, des postes clés dans le crime organisé italien à Montréal. Il a toujours été considéré comme un subalterne et non pas une tête dirigeante.
Donc son lien avec monsieur Di Maulo le laisse...

Donc monsieur Mucci a toujours été un peu dans l'ombre de monsieur Di Maulo. Donc le, le titre était plus ou moins farfelu.


Better late than never, thanks! wink

So another one who fell under Di Maulo's wing. This indicates that Mucci is probably not a made member, because the members of the Montreal Bonanno crew were high ranking in the Montreal Mafia as a whole. The were basically capos in the Cotroni and Rizzuto organizations.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/12/16 04:26 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Frank Cotroni wasn't even a force in his later years, especially after his last release from prison. I also wouldn't jump to conclusions and assume the Cotroni group has all of a sudden regrouped, and become a force within the Montreal Mafia like old times. If there is some newly consolidated Cotroni group, I'd place it in the same group as the typical factions. Meaning it's group comprised of other Italian Canadian & French Canadian criminals moreso than Cotronis themselves. In other words, I simply don't believe there is anything at this point to go on that leads to them suddenly being a standalone faction.


Despite the power shift, Frank Cotroni appeared to maintain
considerable influence in Montreal's underworld.
In July 2002, he was still described in police
intelligence reports as "an important person in the Montreal
Italian Mafia and in Canada."


In '00 period before he died in '04, which are the "later years" I'm referring to, Cotroni wasn't much of a factor in the Montreal underworld, this is at least according to The Northern Connection & Peter Edwards. Not saying it's facts, but there's no reason to assume Edwards wouldn't have an idea. A law enforcement officer from the time is quoted as saying "he's slowed down quite a bit. The organization is in tatters, if you want to call it an organization." This officer is unnamed however, and I don't know which organization he's referring to, most likely the Cotroni group itself, meaning the direct group whom was under Cotroni & his brother themselves. He definitely stayed in contact with various undesirables though, I won't deny that, which was his reason for going back to prison in '02 on a parole violation, meeting with a man who went on to meet with old Cotroni associates. I believe he even released a cookbook during this period, I wonder how guys would've felt about that. It's not exactly writing a memoir but who knows.

Chapter 28 of the aforementioned book details the murder of Franks son Paul in '98. There's another quote by another unnamed member of law enforcement, granted, but the rumors were to them that the killers did a sort of risk assessment before they killed the kid and they supposedly determined "They (Frank's Crime Family?) didn't have the clout in place..."; Meaning the "old Cotroni group" of Frank's didn't have the clout to avenge the death of his own son. These were supposedly bikers, as rumors were he was selling diluted cocaine to biker gangs. Again, rumors, but again Edwards was also a reporter for these groups specifically, and this specific book is usually referenced when sometimes the Cotroni's come up in other places. But hey, he could be wrong, I don't suspect him to be right about everything.


As far as the current status of the immediate group, I think Frank's son Francesco is still around, he served time for murder before, and if he isn't in prison I can see him being the representation for the "Cotroni group", I guess in the same way Leonardo would be for the "Rizzuto group", so I could be wrong about they're current place within the Montreal milieu.


The risk assessment turn out to be wrong, the person that ordered the killing of Paul Cotroni, Johnny Plescio one of the founders of the Rock Machine was killed about two weeks later and his brother Tony Plescio was killed one year later. Johnny Plescio didn't like the fact the Paul& Frank Cotroni Jr. were doing business with HA.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/12/16 04:31 PM

If the Google translate is right I agree with that Mucci was not a major player in the upper echelon either. Still good stuff.

Edit: I may have misunderstood the post just for the record.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/12/16 05:04 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Frank Cotroni wasn't even a force in his later years, especially after his last release from prison. I also wouldn't jump to conclusions and assume the Cotroni group has all of a sudden regrouped, and become a force within the Montreal Mafia like old times. If there is some newly consolidated Cotroni group, I'd place it in the same group as the typical factions. Meaning it's group comprised of other Italian Canadian & French Canadian criminals moreso than Cotronis themselves. In other words, I simply don't believe there is anything at this point to go on that leads to them suddenly being a standalone faction.


Despite the power shift, Frank Cotroni appeared to maintain
considerable influence in Montreal's underworld.
In July 2002, he was still described in police
intelligence reports as "an important person in the Montreal
Italian Mafia and in Canada."


In '00 period before he died in '04, which are the "later years" I'm referring to, Cotroni wasn't much of a factor in the Montreal underworld, this is at least according to The Northern Connection & Peter Edwards. Not saying it's facts, but there's no reason to assume Edwards wouldn't have an idea. A law enforcement officer from the time is quoted as saying "he's slowed down quite a bit. The organization is in tatters, if you want to call it an organization." This officer is unnamed however, and I don't know which organization he's referring to, most likely the Cotroni group itself, meaning the direct group whom was under Cotroni & his brother themselves. He definitely stayed in contact with various undesirables though, I won't deny that, which was his reason for going back to prison in '02 on a parole violation, meeting with a man who went on to meet with old Cotroni associates. I believe he even released a cookbook during this period, I wonder how guys would've felt about that. It's not exactly writing a memoir but who knows.

Chapter 28 of the aforementioned book details the murder of Franks son Paul in '98. There's another quote by another unnamed member of law enforcement, granted, but the rumors were to them that the killers did a sort of risk assessment before they killed the kid and they supposedly determined "They (Frank's Crime Family?) didn't have the clout in place..."; Meaning the "old Cotroni group" of Frank's didn't have the clout to avenge the death of his own son. These were supposedly bikers, as rumors were he was selling diluted cocaine to biker gangs. Again, rumors, but again Edwards was also a reporter for these groups specifically, and this specific book is usually referenced when sometimes the Cotroni's come up in other places. But hey, he could be wrong, I don't suspect him to be right about everything.


As far as the current status of the immediate group, I think Frank's son Francesco is still around, he served time for murder before, and if he isn't in prison I can see him being the representation for the "Cotroni group", I guess in the same way Leonardo would be for the "Rizzuto group", so I could be wrong about they're current place within the Montreal milieu.


It was also a dumb move on the Rock Machine part to pick a fight with the Cotroni's while they are waging war on the Hells. The position of the mafia was do do business with both biker gangs. The Mafia didn't want the Hells to become too powerful. They were playing a balancing act with them. Peter Edwards mentions that in this book that I am presently reading the "The Bandido Massacre"; also heard the same from another source.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/12/16 06:29 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Frank Cotroni wasn't even a force in his later years, especially after his last release from prison. I also wouldn't jump to conclusions and assume the Cotroni group has all of a sudden regrouped, and become a force within the Montreal Mafia like old times. If there is some newly consolidated Cotroni group, I'd place it in the same group as the typical factions. Meaning it's group comprised of other Italian Canadian & French Canadian criminals moreso than Cotronis themselves. In other words, I simply don't believe there is anything at this point to go on that leads to them suddenly being a standalone faction.


Despite the power shift, Frank Cotroni appeared to maintain
considerable influence in Montreal's underworld.
In July 2002, he was still described in police
intelligence reports as "an important person in the Montreal
Italian Mafia and in Canada."


In '00 period before he died in '04, which are the "later years" I'm referring to, Cotroni wasn't much of a factor in the Montreal underworld, this is at least according to The Northern Connection & Peter Edwards. Not saying it's facts, but there's no reason to assume Edwards wouldn't have an idea. A law enforcement officer from the time is quoted as saying "he's slowed down quite a bit. The organization is in tatters, if you want to call it an organization." This officer is unnamed however, and I don't know which organization he's referring to, most likely the Cotroni group itself, meaning the direct group whom was under Cotroni & his brother themselves. He definitely stayed in contact with various undesirables though, I won't deny that, which was his reason for going back to prison in '02 on a parole violation, meeting with a man who went on to meet with old Cotroni associates. I believe he even released a cookbook during this period, I wonder how guys would've felt about that. It's not exactly writing a memoir but who knows.

Chapter 28 of the aforementioned book details the murder of Franks son Paul in '98. There's another quote by another unnamed member of law enforcement, granted, but the rumors were to them that the killers did a sort of risk assessment before they killed the kid and they supposedly determined "They (Frank's Crime Family?) didn't have the clout in place..."; Meaning the "old Cotroni group" of Frank's didn't have the clout to avenge the death of his own son. These were supposedly bikers, as rumors were he was selling diluted cocaine to biker gangs. Again, rumors, but again Edwards was also a reporter for these groups specifically, and this specific book is usually referenced when sometimes the Cotroni's come up in other places. But hey, he could be wrong, I don't suspect him to be right about everything.


As far as the current status of the immediate group, I think Frank's son Francesco is still around, he served time for murder before, and if he isn't in prison I can see him being the representation for the "Cotroni group", I guess in the same way Leonardo would be for the "Rizzuto group", so I could be wrong about they're current place within the Montreal milieu.


The risk assessment turn out to be wrong, the person that ordered the killing of Paul Cotroni, Johnny Plescio one of the founders of the Rock Machine was killed about two weeks later and his brother Tony Plescio was killed one year later. Johnny Plescio didn't like the fact the Paul& Frank Cotroni Jr. were doing business with HA.



Is there definitive proof that Plescio was killed by members of the Cotroni group though? I don't believe so. As you mentioned, they were already in a long standing war against the Hells Angels. The risk assessment simply could've been correct and someone outside of the Cotroni's killed Plescio over drugs, but unrelated to the Paolo Cotroni Jr. murder.


And we see how the Montreal Mafias game with the HAs turned out. They actually ended up empowering them and the HAs have outlasted the mafia group of Montreal for the most part. And I dont doubt the goal was to work with both groups, as evidence shows. Evidence also shows the relationship between The Rock Machine & The Montreal Mafia may have eroded over time. As Leonardo Rizzuto was involved in a fight with a member of Rock Machine, I believe this member was killed afterwards but I could be wrong. And it was I think Paolo Gervasi's kid whom was murdered by mafia loyalists for dealing drugs with the Rock Machine after HA complained. Or I may have that in reverse. And Cazzetta eventually joins up with HAs as well. And he seems to be, at least after Vito's death, the primary liason between the Montreal Mafia & The Hells Angels, him and Greg Wooley.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/12/16 08:16 PM

If you want definitive proof, then you better not believe 90% of what is said on this forum because no one has the proof or facts unless you happen to be there yourself.
It is only logic that a person like Johnny Plescio issues threats to two sons of a notorious crime family, orders the murders of Paolo Cotroni and then this person Johnny Plescio just happens to get killed two weeks after Paolo Cotroni gets killed.
Yep it must be coincidence !
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/12/16 10:27 PM

For what its worth, a very knowlegeable poster on another forum had stumbled upon an FBI file that stated that Gerlando Sciascia was believed (by the Bonanno admin) to have ordered the murder of Cotroni's son and was killed himself as a result of it. I'm not sure, but I believe this was apparantly said by Massino himself.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/12/16 11:17 PM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-a-la-mafia.php

Attempted fire bombing....Marco Pizzi.

Things are heating up again.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/12/16 11:41 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
For what its worth, a very knowlegeable poster on another forum had stumbled upon an FBI file that stated that Gerlando Sciascia was believed (by the Bonanno admin) to have ordered the murder of Cotroni's son and was killed himself as a result of it. I'm not sure, but I believe this was apparantly said by Massino himself.


Gerard Gallant, Rock Machine hitman on orders from Plescio, confessed to having killed Paul Cotroni.
The Massino angle seems strange to me ,if you can get Massino's testimony on this matter I would be interested to know the connection.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/12/16 11:48 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
For what its worth, a very knowlegeable poster on another forum had stumbled upon an FBI file that stated that Gerlando Sciascia was believed (by the Bonanno admin) to have ordered the murder of Cotroni's son and was killed himself as a result of it. I'm not sure, but I believe this was apparantly said by Massino himself.


Gerard Gallant, Rock Machine hitman on orders from Plescio, confessed to having killed Paul Cotroni.
The Massino angle seems strange to me ,if you can get Massino's testimony on this matter I would be interested to know the connection.
'

I agree, maybe West End leader Raymond Desfossés had something to do with it because Gallant was his man.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/13/16 01:06 AM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
As Leonardo Rizzuto was involved in a fight with a member of Rock Machine, I believe this member was killed afterwards but I could be wrong.


Yes, almost certain he was killed. I think he even tried to go on the run once he found out who Leonardo was as I don't think he would have done it had he known.

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
For what its worth, a very knowlegeable poster on another forum had stumbled upon an FBI file that stated that Gerlando Sciascia was believed (by the Bonanno admin) to have ordered the murder of Cotroni's son and was killed himself as a result of it. I'm not sure, but I believe this was apparantly said by Massino himself.


That would jive with the story that Vitale might have testified to that they tried to make up a story on Sciascia. I mean it's not exact word for word but makes sense that they would spread the rumor to not think Massino was behind the hit or at least give them a reason to do it.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/13/16 02:50 AM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
As Leonardo Rizzuto was involved in a fight with a member of Rock Machine, I believe this member was killed afterwards but I could be wrong.


Yes, almost certain he was killed. I think he even tried to go on the run once he found out who Leonardo was as I don't think he would have done it had he known.

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
For what its worth, a very knowlegeable poster on another forum had stumbled upon an FBI file that stated that Gerlando Sciascia was believed (by the Bonanno admin) to have ordered the murder of Cotroni's son and was killed himself as a result of it. I'm not sure, but I believe this was apparantly said by Massino himself.


That would jive with the story that Vitale might have testified to that they tried to make up a story on Sciascia. I mean it's not exact word for word but makes sense that they would spread the rumor to not think Massino was behind the hit or at least give them a reason to do it.


Leonardo Rizzuto was not beaten by the Rock Machine, the biker that beat him up was a Hells Angel underling.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/13/16 10:23 PM

I didn't say he was beaten by a Rock Machine member, I overlooked it and Sinatra is the one that said Rock Machine. I just simply missed it when replying.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/13/16 10:50 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
I didn't say he was beaten by a Rock Machine member, I overlooked it and Sinatra is the one that said Rock Machine. I just simply missed it when replying.


Yes, I know it wasn't you Dixiemafia, that is why my response included Sinatra's quote. My apology if it was misconstrued.

I just wanted to correct the error in the original quote.
Posted By: vito_andolini

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 01:22 PM

Another fire-bombing at a business owned by Marco Pizzi: http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12...ocktail-molotov
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 02:00 PM

Originally Posted By: vito_andolini
Another fire-bombing at a business owned by Marco Pizzi: http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12...ocktail-molotov


Poor dude is catching hell up there lol


No worries Ciment!
Posted By: Moe_Tilden

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 02:05 PM

What's it all aboot?
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 06:49 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
Originally Posted By: vito_andolini
Another fire-bombing at a business owned by Marco Pizzi: http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12...ocktail-molotov


Poor dude is catching hell up there lol


No worries Ciment!


He doesn't seem to get the message.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 06:59 PM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ie-criminel.php

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/police-investigating-arson-at-east-end-used-car-lot

This is the LaPresse & Gazzette version.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 08:17 PM

It seems they're going all in to get Pizzi or anyone close to him...

I figure he'll be dead before the new year or people will have taken over his interests.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 09:10 PM

Seems like Pizzi is the last one defending the interests of the Rizzuto-Sollecito faction. Perhaps these bombings are also linked to the fire of that restaurant.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 10:17 PM

I agree that would make sense.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 10:24 PM


Quebec court acquits man in Hells Angels slaying after key witness admits lying

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/quebec-cour...lying-1.3203637
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 10:36 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
It seems they're going all in to get Pizzi or anyone close to him...

I figure he'll be dead before the new year or people will have taken over his interests.



Good possibility, December is usually a busy month for the hitmen.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 11:06 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: eurodave
It seems they're going all in to get Pizzi or anyone close to him...

I figure he'll be dead before the new year or people will have taken over his interests.



Good possibility, December is usually a busy month for the hitmen.


You suppose they get a Christmas bonus?

As for Pizzo, I think that he might be some a sort of street boss for the jailed leaders of the old Rizzuto group who are still holding ground. They probably still have a crew of loyalist who pose a threat to the group trying to take over. I figure the restaurant set on fire might be their work and a message to the usurpers who in turn sent a message back by firebombing Pizzo's business.

Could it really be back to the basics with the old Rizzuto group aka Sicilian faction against the old Cotroni group aka Calabrian faction? With the latest developments it definitely seems like it. It wasn't so simple back in 2010 when it was a mixture vying for control.
Posted By: ralphie_cifaretto

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 11:09 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: eurodave
It seems they're going all in to get Pizzi or anyone close to him...

I figure he'll be dead before the new year or people will have taken over his interests.



Good possibility, December is usually a busy month for the hitmen.


You suppose they get a Christmas bonus?

As for Pizzo, I think that he might be some a sort of street boss for the jailed leaders of the old Rizzuto group who are still holding ground. They probably still have a crew of loyalist who pose a threat to the group trying to take over. I figure the restaurant set on fire might be their work and a message to the usurpers who in turn sent a message back by firebombing Pizzo's business.

Could it really be back to the basics with the old Rizzuto group aka Sicilian faction against the old Cotroni group aka Calabrian faction? With the latest developments it definitely seems like it.


It's Pizzi..not Pizzo
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 11:09 PM

It should be an interesting 2017.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 11:13 PM

Originally Posted By: ralphie_cifaretto
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: eurodave
It seems they're going all in to get Pizzi or anyone close to him...

I figure he'll be dead before the new year or people will have taken over his interests.



Good possibility, December is usually a busy month for the hitmen.


You suppose they get a Christmas bonus?

As for Pizzo, I think that he might be some a sort of street boss for the jailed leaders of the old Rizzuto group who are still holding ground. They probably still have a crew of loyalist who pose a threat to the group trying to take over. I figure the restaurant set on fire might be their work and a message to the usurpers who in turn sent a message back by firebombing Pizzo's business.

Could it really be back to the basics with the old Rizzuto group aka Sicilian faction against the old Cotroni group aka Calabrian faction? With the latest developments it definitely seems like it.


It's Pizzi..not Pizzo


Do you think Pizzi is still collecting Pizzo?

You can consider it a typo given the proximity of the letters...
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 11:33 PM

I know back then in 2010 it was more like a minestrone of different clans trying to out do the other. We're starting to see more clarity by process of elimination.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/14/16 11:44 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
I know back then in 2010 it was more like a minestrone of different clans trying to out do the other. We're starting to see more clarity by process of elimination.


In 2010 it was a coalition of different groups against the Rizzutos that fell apart a year later.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/15/16 12:23 AM

It was definitely more of a broth in 2010 with various groups vying for control which have now over time been exposed.

What we know for sure is that multiple fire bombings are usually a sign of things to come. Come to think of it, back in in 2009 most of the attacks on cafes were considered rizzuto bars, very few if any di maulo desjardins bars were fire bombed.

Leading up to Spagnolos death...rizzuto headquarters were hit


Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/15/16 01:26 AM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
It was definitely more of a broth in 2010 with various groups vying for control which have now over time been exposed.

What we know for sure is that multiple fire bombings are usually a sign of things to come. Come to think of it, back in in 2009 most of the attacks on cafes were considered rizzuto bars, very few if any di maulo desjardins bars were fire bombed.

Leading up to Spagnolos death...rizzuto headquarters were hit




The general consensus is that it was a coalition of Montagna-Arcuri-Di Maulo-Desjardins-De Vito that wanted to establish a new order and eliminate the Rizzuto leaders. That coalition fell apart in the summer of 2011 when Montagna conspired against Desjardins. The rest is history.

I agree with you that we're now seeing a similar pattern. However it needs to be noted that some of the firebombings in 2010 were attributed to Rizzuto loyalists ([BadWord] group). I figure they tried to keep control (by threat) of some businesses for drug trafficking purposes.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/15/16 02:10 PM

Nicola Spagnolo, the son of Vincenzo Spagnolo (who was killed this past October), has a contract on his head.

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/12/14/un-contrat-sur-la-tete-du-membre-de-la-mafia-nic-spagnolo
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/15/16 02:16 PM

Oh shit. So it's looking like it's back to the basics after all with the Cotroni-Rizzuto group going head to head for control of the Montreal Mafia. At least thats what it looks like. I think the imprisonment of other guys whom were speculated to be involved in this over drug offenses, like the Scoppa's, cleared the way for this to happen. It seems like the remnants of the old Rizzuto & Cotroni groups (I guess you can group Arcadi up with them now), is the only ones left on the street, and they aren't going to stop until the other side is completely wiped out. That's just my theory of course.
Posted By: Moe_Tilden

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/15/16 02:20 PM

A lot of armchair quarterbacking on this thread.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/15/16 02:49 PM

As a one famous song said......Let it go, let it go...lol

In all seriousness, first the father now this dude and Pizzi, it's just a matter of time before they get to you.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/15/16 03:05 PM

I figure it had to happen sooner or later, they were just biding their time. With all these killings the new order set up after Vito Rizzuto's death was always an uneasy alliance. There was no clear, undisputed leader which suggests that they weren't prepared for Rizzuto's death. It's pretty amazing how fate can unfold and the unpredictability of events could make this a Game of Thrones 'Montreal Mafia special' episode.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/15/16 03:25 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: eurodave
It was definitely more of a broth in 2010 with various groups vying for control which have now over time been exposed.

What we know for sure is that multiple fire bombings are usually a sign of things to come. Come to think of it, back in in 2009 most of the attacks on cafes were considered rizzuto bars, very few if any di maulo desjardins bars were fire bombed.

Leading up to Spagnolos death...rizzuto headquarters were hit




The general consensus is that it was a coalition of Montagna-Arcuri-Di Maulo-Desjardins-De Vito that wanted to establish a new order and eliminate the Rizzuto leaders. That coalition fell apart in the summer of 2011 when Montagna conspired against Desjardins. The rest is history.

I agree with you that we're now seeing a similar pattern. However it needs to be noted that some of the firebombings in 2010 were attributed to Rizzuto loyalists ([BadWord] group). I figure they tried to keep control (by threat) of some businesses for drug trafficking purposes.


If the Rizzuto side/loyalists survive this there is nothing that can take them out of power lol
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/15/16 06:26 PM

http://aboutthemafia.com/nicola-spagnolo-now-a-target-in-the-ongoing-montreal-mafia-war

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/12/14/un-contrat-sur-la-tete-du-membre-de-la-mafia-nic-spagnolo

Nicola Spagnolo now a target.
Posted By: BronaZora

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 12:32 AM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
Oh shit. So it's looking like it's back to the basics after all with the Cotroni-Rizzuto group going head to head for control of the Montreal Mafia. At least thats what it looks like.


That was always the case, even when this whole thing started, it's just that people got confused because Montagna was in the picture and for a split second people thought that perhaps the Bonnanos were making a come back, when the truth was that Montagna was simply deported and he had no other choice but to get involved in Montreal to stay relevant. The mistake he made was he underestimated the power Desjardins had, he also thought that his Bonnano status actually meant something to these guys when the reality was that it did not matter much. He would have fared better if he just stuck with the alliance he made with the Cotroni guys and just be part of them, I mean he still would've been targeted by Vito once he got out but he would have had a better chance of surviving and staying relevant in the game had he stuck with those guys.

Anyways, while the picture does involve other external factors such as the Toronto Calabrian clans and the Contrera-Caruana clan, the root of the problem goes back to the beef between Nicolo Rizzuto and Paolo Violi, plain and simple. When the Rizzuto family took out the Violi brothers the Montreal group was still under the Bonnano banner. The Bonnanos gave the OK because Nicolo Rizzuto was heavily connected and close to the Sicilians, who were not only the main importers of narcotics, but also at the top of their game, this was a time where the Sicilian LCN was the most powerful Mafia out of Italy, not the 'Ndrangheta, it was also a time where the American LCN was declining heavily, so the Bonnanos basically did not want to risk messing with the Rizzutos nor did they want to lose the cash they were bringing in. Vic Cotroni had no choice but to give his blesssing, he was an old man and just wanted peace, if it meant taking out his protege so be it, the Rizzutos were way too powerful and were on their way to becoming the most powerful group out of Canada. Once the Violis were out, the Rizzuto faction stopped the war because the Cotronis backed out peacefully and agreed to give them the leadership of the group.

When the Rizzutos took over, Nicolo focused on his Sicilian connections and importing narcotics out of South America, while Vito was left to control the group in Montreal. At the time Southern Ontario (Toronto and Hamilton) was pretty much under the control of the Buffalo Mob, independent families did operate there of course such as the Calabrian clans of Toronto along the Luppinos and Musitanos out of Hamilton, but everyone played by the rules of Stefano Magaddino. Well when the Rizzutos took over, Magaddino was gone and the American LCN was pretty much in decline. The first move out of Montreal was to simply recruit Peter Scarcella and have him be their main representative in Toronto, those of you who don't know Scarcella, he was a Sicilian mobster that at one point was the driver for Paul Volpe, a Toronto mobster that was a made guy in the Buffalo Mob. Volpe was only a solider but he did have his own crew in Toronto so he was considered somewhat of a boss, when he got killed, it was Scarcella that took over that group which still exists today I believe. With Scarcella representing Vito in Toronto, and the Contrera-Caruana clan also operating there, the Rizzuto influence over the city was set. Their next sight was Hamilton, though this was a tougher task since John Papalia was actually a capo and he had a whole crew that was powerful there, also the Luppinos operated there who were Rizzuto enemies since Paolo Violi was married to the daughter of don Giacomo Luppino. So it seems like the Rizzutos waited til the 90's to make their move, this was a time where the Musitano family was rising, the Papalias and the Luppinos were declining, so Vito likely gave the order to take out the heads of the Papalia crew and pretty much made the Musitanos as his representives in Hamilton.

Business was good until Vito went to jail, but I should also say that going to jail or not this war would have still happened, why? Because of Violi's sons, plain and simple. These guys are pretty much the heads of the Luppino family in Hamilton, they're young and hungry for revenge and power, they're the main culprit of this whole war. They have good relations with the Toronto clans who are pretty much the most powerful today, they're backing the Cotroni group because their dad was in that faction, and they're likely driving the Musitanos out of power in Hamilton. If Leonardo Rizzuto wants a target, it should be these guys, I mean he may still have to deal with the Cotroni loyalists in Montreal, but so long as the Violis live, they'll always take out any Rizzuto man standing.

A good question is where does Arcadi stand in all of this? There was rumors that when he gets out he was going to make a run for it and take power away from this new leadership table. Seeing how Cotroni loyalists are taking anyone that was connected to Vito out, Acradi should rethink his plans carefuly, he's probably better off joining up with Rizzuto/Sollecito if he wants to survive, because I'm not sure the other side is interested in having him.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 12:57 AM

Brona good recap.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 08:15 AM

In the late 1970s or even the 80s the New York families weren't that much in decline yet and still very powerful. Their real decline started in the 90s. However, for the Bonannos the 90s were a good time and it wasn't until their entire administration flipped that everything fell apart. Montagna's status meant enough for people to align with him. However Desjardins himself didn't have much to do with the Bonannos at that point and neither did his guys which is why they didn't care for him to be the leader, and when Montagna tried to take out Desjardins it was simply kill or be killed.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 09:00 AM

@Bronazora


+100

Good post, you get the importance of the drugs. And the position Sicily had at the time, in the WORLD, not just the US, and Canada.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 09:01 AM

And your take on it jives with the opinion of Lee Lamothe, one of the authors of Sixth Family. In the mafia books thread, he said you would have to be dumb to see all this aggression vs the Rizzutos as anything but a vendetta...
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 12:49 PM

Great summary there and it seems to represent the situation quite well. I'd like to add that the Violis aren't the only ones seeking revenge, many montreal players were waiting for the Rizzuto empire to crumble. Desjardins best friend Bartolo had been murdered by the clan and some would argue the true violence started at that point.

The Violi angle is becoming more and more apparent it seems. It would make sense for theme to want the Rizzuto clan dead at all costs but they need support for that....the Hamilton mob on its own can't guarantee that kind of decision. They most likely have the blessing and support of the ndrangheta including nyc in the mix.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 03:10 PM

I'm not sure whether New York still wants to be involved in that powder keg (as Nicaso ones eloquently put it). If the Violis are the instigators, they're able to be so because New York has washed their hands of the city. And they don't have the manpower to take over Montreal themselves and so they have to resort to making alliances with players from within the city, which is obviously the case.
Posted By: BronaZora

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 04:58 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
In the late 1970s or even the 80s the New York families weren't that much in decline yet and still very powerful. Their real decline started in the 90s. However, for the Bonannos the 90s were a good time and it wasn't until their entire administration flipped that everything fell apart. Montagna's status meant enough for people to align with him. However Desjardins himself didn't have much to do with the Bonannos at that point and neither did his guys which is why they didn't care for him to be the leader, and when Montagna tried to take out Desjardins it was simply kill or be killed.


You're correct, the American Mafia was still powerful in the 70s/80s but it was in a steady decline. The truth is the American LCN was at its highest peak from the 30s to the 50s, they ran the syndicate like an oiled machine and no other Italian Mob group around the world compared. Then you had significant turning points such as the Apalachin meeting and the Valachi testimony, both of these events were the beginning of the decline. American LE started to catch up and with each decade, their power and influence decreased.

When the American Mafia was at its might, the Mob groups in Italy were very peasant like. That all changed when the Sicilians got their act together and created their own commission in the late 50s. Ironically, it was the Americans that helped them create it and Joe Bonnano of all people was one of the main organizers, from then on (Until they decided to act stupid and take on the Italian government) the Sicilians were on the rise which eventually played into the favor of the Rizzuto family later on.

During the 70s/80s the Montreal Mob was still very much so under the Bonnanos, by the 90s I would argue that they were under the Bonnano banner by name only but were independent and acted as such, they did kick up to them but I feel it was out of respect for Gerlando Sciascia since he was very close to Vito. Once Sciascia was gone, that was the end of it as it was clear that no more envelopes were being sent. Vitale was apparently sent to Montreal to make Vito a capo around 2001, he was received with respect and all but Vito declined the offer, that was a clear message to the Bonnanos that just in case they did not understand the memo back in 1999 (No more envelopes), this offer refusal should make it very clear that their time in Montreal was done.

As for Montagna's status, it was enough to get him a hello and an invitation to the club, but certainly not enough to make him the main power player. If he was gonna play, he should have just chosen a side and stuck with it to the end, instead he approached this as a Bonnano and acted like he wanted to bring them under the Bonnano order. This is why he approached Nicolo Rizzuto first and asked him to step down, when Nick Sr declined, Sal decided to team up with the opposition. He joined up with Desjardins and the other Cotroni loyalists, he also made trips to Hamilton to meet with the Luppino family (Violi brothers). It seems like his Bonnano status got the best of him because he thought he could just get rid of Desjardins and take control of the Cotroni guys, he did not realize that these guys don't care whether you're made or not, they were loyal to their own guys. Desjardins was the brother in law of Joe Di Maulo, he was also very connected to the Hells Angels and had significant power in the city of Montreal, Montagna's support was no where close to such in the city and the fact that there was no retribution made should be clear evidence that the group cared very little for him.

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
I'm not sure whether New York still wants to be involved in that powder keg (as Nicaso ones eloquently put it). If the Violis are the instigators, they're able to be so because New York has washed their hands of the city. And they don't have the manpower to take over Montreal themselves and so they have to resort to making alliances with players from within the city, which is obviously the case.


The Violis are not exactly trying to take over Montreal, their base is in Hamilton and I believe they'll continue to advance their power there. They're just heavily involved in taking out the Rizzutos and replacing them with the Cotroni faction. After all not only was their dad killed by the Rizzutos, he was also a top Cotroni guy. Their recent meeting with Frank Cotroni's son along with other signs are an indication of their heavy involvement, it's also obvious that the two sides are very close to one another historically. To extend the picture further I believe the Toronto clans who are the ultimate power today are probably in favor of this since they were always seen as Rizzuto's main indirect rivals, and while I'd say that the Montreal war in itself may not be a Sicilian vs Calabrese thing, when the 'Ndrangheta is involved, I think being a Calabrese may actually mean something, in which all of these guys (Luppinos/Violis and the Cotronis) are, the Musitanos are also Calabrese, but they were Vito's allies, back then this was a great thing, but times have changed and this past alliance may mean trouble for them in the near future.

As far as New York or any other American mafia family goes, their say in the matters or affairs within Canada is none existent. Their only say is in business dealings and ventures with the families of Canada, that's it.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 06:16 PM

Originally Posted By: BronaZora
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
In the late 1970s or even the 80s the New York families weren't that much in decline yet and still very powerful. Their real decline started in the 90s. However, for the Bonannos the 90s were a good time and it wasn't until their entire administration flipped that everything fell apart. Montagna's status meant enough for people to align with him. However Desjardins himself didn't have much to do with the Bonannos at that point and neither did his guys which is why they didn't care for him to be the leader, and when Montagna tried to take out Desjardins it was simply kill or be killed.


You're correct, the American Mafia was still powerful in the 70s/80s but it was in a steady decline. The truth is the American LCN was at its highest peak from the 30s to the 50s, they ran the syndicate like an oiled machine and no other Italian Mob group around the world compared. Then you had significant turning points such as the Apalachin meeting and the Valachi testimony, both of these events were the beginning of the decline. American LE started to catch up and with each decade, their power and influence decreased.


The American Mafia as a whole was in decline by the 1970s, but the New York families weren't that much affected until the mid 80s. It wasn't until the 90s that they lost much of their power over the unions among other things. By that time the Bonannos weren't involved in the unions anymore and so were able to fly under the radar and left unscathed until the early 2000s.

Quote:
During the 70s/80s the Montreal Mob was still very much so under the Bonnanos, by the 90s I would argue that they were under the Bonnano banner by name only but were independent and acted as such, they did kick up to them but I feel it was out of respect for Gerlando Sciascia since he was very close to Vito. Once Sciascia was gone, that was the end of it as it was clear that no more envelopes were being sent. Vitale was apparently sent to Montreal to make Vito a capo around 2001, he was received with respect and all but Vito declined the offer, that was a clear message to the Bonnanos that just in case they did not understand the memo back in 1999 (No more envelopes)


It hasn't been made clear whether envelops were still being send or not after 1999. Vitale even admitted as such. Domenick Cicale, another turncoat, claimed that tribute was still being send. He also said that Massino and Rizzuto partnered a stripclub. In addition, journalist Daniel Renaud stated that Montagna was used as a go-between and reguraly traveled to Montreal in the years before his deportation.

Anyway, this discussion seems to be never-ending due to conflicting statements, opinions and preferences. And even if Massino himself comes out of the woodwork and states that he was still receiving tribute, the people believing in the 1999 indepence will probably refute it.

As for myself, I don't think or very much doubt that the Bonannos are still involved in Montreal, but I don't believe it ended in 1999, unless Massino confirms it.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 06:27 PM

Great posts Brona. Only thing I might disagree with is whether this would have happened or not under Vito's reign. I think if he stayed out of prison then no chance it happens because he was simply untouchable at that point. Once he went away, it gave the Controni/Violi faction and Desjardins (who seemed to be plotting his revenge already) faction was ready to pounce at that point. They were biding their time and figured more than likely he would eventually go down and they got their chance once Massino started talking. Most like Di Maulo who knew that would sink Vito, probably let others like Desjardins who might have not known (I think he drove Di Maulo then so he probably did know already) that it was coming and they plotted their revenge once Vito started fighting extradition.

I just don't see anyone strong enough until then to attempt an overthrow of Vito.

But excellent posts!
Posted By: BronaZora

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 06:52 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
The American Mafia as a whole was in decline by the 1970s, but the New York families weren't that much affected until the mid 80s. It wasn't until the 90s that they lost much of their power over the unions among other things. By that time the Bonannos weren't involved in the unions anymore and so were able to fly under the radar and left unscathed until the early 2000s.


This is why I said it was a steady decline, it took decades but LE eventually caught up.

Quote:
It hasn't been made clear whether envelops were still being send or not after 1999. Vitale even admitted as such. Domenick Cicale, another turncoat, claimed that tribute was still being send. He also said that Massino and Rizzuto partnered a stripclub. In addition, journalist Daniel Renaud stated that Montagna was used as a go-between and reguraly traveled to Montreal in the years before his deportation.

Anyway, this discussion seems to be never-ending due to conflicting statements, opinions and preferences. And even if Massino himself comes out of the woodwork and states that he was still receiving tribute, the people believing in the 1999 indepence will probably refute it.


I get there are mixed opinions, but Vito declining to be a capo was the biggest answer to Montreal's independence. Also being a business partner with Massino is one thing and answering to him is completely another matter. Vito above all was a successful business man, he always preferred the way of diplomacy which is why he was able to remain the boss of Montreal and be on top for such a long time. Even if they did not answer to the Bonnanos, there was still a lot of business to be made (Remember, these guys transported narcotics to the US, they needed people to distribute), it should also be clear that Vito did business with other families, notably the Gambinos, so it's only natural that these families keep in touch, there's a lot of money to be made. Further proof to this, due to the power shift in Canada and the conflict in Montreal, today we are seeing more of these Canada/US relations transition to the NY families and the families in Toronto instead of Montreal, does that mean the 'Ndrangheta families of Toronto answer to New York? Absolutely not.

Quote:
As for myself, I don't think or very much doubt that the Bonannos are still involved in Montreal, but I don't believe it ended in 1999, unless Massino confirms it.


The Bonnanos and all the other American families are having a hard time operating within their own turfs thank to American LE, if they're having such rough time on their own ground, I highly doubt they're capable enough to be involved in matters or control families in other countries.

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
Great posts Brona. Only thing I might disagree with is whether this would have happened or not under Vito's reign. I think if he stayed out of prison then no chance it happens because he was simply untouchable at that point. Once he went away, it gave the Controni/Violi faction and Desjardins (who seemed to be plotting his revenge already) faction was ready to pounce at that point. They were biding their time and figured more than likely he would eventually go down and they got their chance once Massino started talking. Most like Di Maulo who knew that would sink Vito, probably let others like Desjardins who might have not known (I think he drove Di Maulo then so he probably did know already) that it was coming and they plotted their revenge once Vito started fighting extradition.

I just don't see anyone strong enough until then to attempt an overthrow of Vito.

But excellent posts!


Even if Vito did not go to jail, the Violi brothers and the Cotroni loyalists would eventually look for revenge, specially with the rise of the 'Ndrangheta families and their potential backing. The Rizzutos would have fared much better that's for sure, but a war would have happened eventually.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 09:46 PM

Originally Posted By: BronaZora

Even if Vito did not go to jail, the Violi brothers and the Cotroni loyalists would eventually look for revenge, specially with the rise of the 'Ndrangheta families and their potential backing. The Rizzutos would have fared much better that's for sure, but a war would have happened eventually.


I agree the honour of the Violi family was at stake. That's the risk the Rizzuto took when they let the sons live.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 10:18 PM

Marco Pizzi's name also appeared this summer on a blacklist of the Hells Angels. So maybe an agreement between the bikers and Rizzuto enemies like some media reported isn't far-fetched. It's a small world.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/16/16 10:23 PM

I agree.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/17/16 01:00 AM

About the Bonannos they are done in Canada according to a good source on the RD forum. If there is one NY family with influence in Canada now it's the Gambinos.
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/17/16 10:17 AM

I think the Rizzuto/Caruana-[BadWord]-ra/ Gambino connections go back to at least the 70s, Nicola Rizzuto was partners in a ranch with a number of heavyweight Gambinos and narcotics traffickers.

I think anti mafia posted something about Paolo Gambino having meetings in Ontario I the 70s.....



(The whole link....)
https://www.tni.org/en/paper/rothschilds-mafia-aruba



(Specifically)


Only when the Americans and Italians pooled their findings did they grasp what was going on. In 1983 the Italian police summarized their investigations in the Bono+159 report. The report identified [BadWord] and Caruana as the pivot of the well organized network moving heroin up to the US and the money down. It was the first time the clan was thoroughly examined. In fact, the police had uncovered part of the supply line for the Pizza Connection. But, while the US Pizza Connection trial resulted in the conviction of a significant segment of the network the authorities didn't find the real link between North-America and Sicily. (48) That missing link was to be found in Venezuela, where the [BadWord]-Caruana clan had set up their headquarters at the start of the 1970s, buying hotels and founding a string of businesses in Caracas and Valencia.

The most intriguing of the dozens [BadWord]-Caruana enterprises was a cattle-breeding company on an extended ranch in the state of Barinas, close to the Colombian border. It had its own private airstrip. A special task-force of the Venezuelan intelligence-service DISIP looked at this farm called Ganaderia Rio Zapa, established in 1971. (49) The shareholders of the firm represented the creme-de-la-creme of Mafia heroin-movers in those days:

(NOTE, NO BONNANOS AS FAR AS IMPORTATION, LAUNDERING, THEY ONLY COME INTO PLAY ONCE THE STUFF GETS TO NEW YORK FOR DISTRIBUTION...)

* Salvatore 'Cicchiteddu' Greco, the former head of the overall Commission of the Sicilian Cosa Nostra, and one of the pioneers in the international heroin trade (50);
* Nick Rizzuto, a lieutenant in the Montreal-based Cotroni Family, but highly independent and in fact subordinate to the Sicilian Mafia (i.e. [BadWord]-Caruana);
* Antonio Napoli, a high-ranking made member of the New York Gambino Family and 'the biggest mover of junk to the United States' (51);
* John Gambino, a relative of Carlo Gambino and boss of the Sicilian faction of the New York Gambino Family (52);
* Brothers Angelo and Francesco Mongiovì, figure-heads of the [BadWord] in Caracas and Italy's financial centre Milan. According to a DEA report, Angelo's son Nino Mongiovì married Paolo [BadWord]'s daughter and was the 'super manager for drugs of all kinds passing through Miami'. (53)

The DEA spotted them investigating the Napoli brothers of the Gambino Family in New York. Antonio Napoli had moved to Venezuela and was a partner in a [BadWord] business. At the time DEA headquarters figured the trail irrelevant; nevertheless, special agent Tom Tripodi was sent to Caracas. DEA-analyst Mona Ewell told reporter Claire Sterling that Tripodi "came back with the whole thing." (54)

"We saw the [BadWord] and the Caruanas. The security around their homes was incredible... They had control in Venezuela like you wouldn't believe... We saw their businesses, all fronts for paper-shuffling. What these people handled was the money. Their names had been coming up for years on the money. Historically, they worked the money. They did it for cocaine as well as heroin ... It was a tremendous operation, and it was going on a long, long time... In my opinion, that's still the key. They're the people with the money; they've been in the business of narcotics the longest."

The implication, as Italian investigator Alessandro Pansa has noted is that "Venezuela has its own Cosa Nostra family as if it is Sicilian territory ... Until this day, the structure and hierarchy of the Mafia has been entirely reproduced in Venezuela ... The clan has direct links with the ruling Commission of the Sicilian Mafia, and are acknowledged by the American Cosa Nostra." Pansa claims that they are the funnel for the Gambino Family. Indeed, according to Tommaso Buscetta, it was the all-powerful New York Mafia boss Carlo Gambino himself who sponsored the acknowledgement of the [BadWord]-Caruana Family. (55)
Posted By: CabriniGreen

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/17/16 10:38 AM

I got a question guys, what exact role did Salvatore Catalano play, in regards, wait, let me rephrase...

Where did he stand in terms of;

1. His role within the Bonnano family? I know he was a capo, but in Sixth Family, they said he stayed to himself and just concerned himself with moving Sicilian mafia heroin. Yet he was important enough that he almost made boss of the family. I'm assuming this was a Sicilian mafia initiative? Them trying to get THIER MAN in a top spot in New York. To go with their operatives in South America, Sicily, and Montreal. I can't see the American guys having sponsored that decision.

2. What was his role in relation to John Gambino?
I ask cause I could never get a handle on WHO was in charge of the Pizza connection.
Having asked that question, I suspect Gambino oversaw the American end of the ENTIRE OPERATION, ( importation, distribution, AND laundering the money) while Catalano was in charge of distribution in NY?
Or was it, Bonnanos distribute in Brooklyn, and the Gambinos had Jersey? But they both were operating in Queens right? Did they split it?

I think John Gambino handled a separate operation, but was SUPPLIED by the same source in Sicily as the Bonnanos. I think the Bonnano dope came through the Caruana-[BadWord]-ras, through the Rizzutos, whereas the Gambinos dope went direct to the Cherry Hill crew, who were moving shit DIRECT for the Palermo clans. Whereas the Rizzuto groups loyalty was to Agrigento, and their allies?

(This excerpt)

The investigation only looked at the years 1978-85, and the figures proved to be conservative. Subsequent evidence revealed that the investigators had missed a lot of what was going on. In 1992 pentito Gaspare Mutolo, Cosa Nostra's contact with Thai traffickers, disclosed massive heroin transports at the start of the 1980s. In 1981, Mutolo organized a 400 kilo shipment to the US. The [BadWord]-Caruana clan received half of the load, while John Gambino's crew took care of the other 200 kilos. When the money of the first deal came back, Mutolo immediately started to arrange another similar transport. (57)



SEE HOW THEY SPLIT THE LOAD?


3. Any info on how the Gambino relationship with Toronto works present day would be greatly appreciated..
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/17/16 11:48 AM

The killed Carmine Verduci had also close links to the Gambino family.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/17/16 02:55 PM

Deadly conflict between pot producers
Sentenced to nine years for killing his boss

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12/16/conflit-mortel-entre-producteurs-de-pot
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/17/16 06:33 PM

It seems the Gambino's have contacts with specific Ndrangheta clans both in NYC, Toronto and Italy.

Certain Italian indictments revealed that Ndrangheta clans have been supplying Cosa Nostra clans for a few years, dividing their turf and supply routes by either selling narcotics to eastern sicilian or western sicilian clans. I had read the Aquino-Coluccio and Commisso-Crupi's divide sicily by shipping either towards Catania or Palermo, the two biggest hubs for cocaine consumption and cosa nostra strongholds.

These relationships have been exposed, to a certain extent, by New Bridge and other elements of American ndrangheta building relationships with the American LCN. The role the Rizzuto clan and the CC clan has been somewhat replaced by stronger ndrangheta families with solid south american contacts. This isn't to say that cosa nostra clans aren't importing their own blow, but it seems the calabrians have solid supply routes at the moment.

This could also explain the recent turmoil in Canada, which is in a current state of war and renewal. The Calabrians want the market, they want revenge and they have power to do it.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/17/16 08:07 PM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...de-montreal.php

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...l-pasta-factory

Another molotov at a pasta company.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/18/16 04:53 PM

That pasta company is Sicilian owned
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/18/16 10:54 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
That pasta company is Sicilian owned


Are you sure?

The company's website seems to indicate the family's roots in Campobasso, Molise--see http://pastaromana.com/en/history/.

Speaking of which, have any of the Quebecers om this board heard whether Mylena Di Maulo and Frank Cotroni Jr. are separated? divorced?
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/18/16 11:07 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: eurodave
That pasta company is Sicilian owned


Are you sure?

The company's website seems to indicate the family's roots in Campobasso, Molise--see http://pastaromana.com/en/history/.

Speaking of which, have any of the Quebecers om this board heard whether Mylena Di Maulo and Frank Cotroni Jr. are separated? divorced?


I can't call them and ask lol but I was told they were Sicilian...the company is named Romana but yet their "history" is in Molise.....identity crisis much lol

Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/18/16 11:18 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Originally Posted By: eurodave
That pasta company is Sicilian owned


Are you sure?

The company's website seems to indicate the family's roots in Campobasso, Molise--see http://pastaromana.com/en/history/.

Speaking of which, have any of the Quebecers om this board heard whether Mylena Di Maulo and Frank Cotroni Jr. are separated? divorced?


Found same online:

Francesco married Milena Di Maulo, the daughter of high-ranking mobster Jos Di Maulo, in the summer of 1991. The event was held at the Marie-Riene-du-Monde cathedral in downtown Montreal and was attended by some of the top members of the Mafia, West End Gang, and the Dubois Clan. The couple would have two children together but their marriage would unfortunately end in divorce in late 2000.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/19/16 12:11 AM

Yeah they were divorced. Francesco was at the funeral of Di Maulo, but you never know how relations really were at the end.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/19/16 02:29 AM

Currently there are in Quebec about 80 active Hells Angels in freedom and 160 members of subordinate clubs or sympathizers. They celebrated their 39th birthday celebrations in Canada on Saturday night at a Sainte-Anne-de-Sorel hotel.
Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/19/16 05:07 AM

So i would imagine frank cotronis sons were inducted into the bonanno family when frank sr was still the capo during the 90tys even thou the rizzutos had the power. Are the controni kids made men? I would think the pops probaly asked massino and did the inductions themselves up there.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/20/16 11:58 AM

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12/20/le-bistro-pot-masson-vise-par-un-cocktail-molotov

Another molotov at Bistro Pot Masson

MONTREAL | The Pot Masson bistro, located on a Avenue in the borough of Rosemont-La-Petite-Patrie in Montreal, was the target of a Molotov cocktail during the night from Monday to Tuesday.
According to Benoit Boisselle, a public relations officer with the Montreal Police Department (SPVM), "a restaurant window was smashed by an unknown object before an incendiary object was thrown" a little before 2:30 am .
Fortunately, staff who were still on site were able to control the fire before the flames could cause serious damage.
No one was injured during the event.
The SPVM's arson investigators will begin their investigation in the morning, Agent Boisselle said.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/20/16 02:48 PM

^^^^
According to Quebec's business registry, the primary and majority shareholder of Pot Masson is a woman named Roxane Mercier. Does her name ring a bell?
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/20/16 04:57 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
^^^^
According to Quebec's business registry, the primary and majority shareholder of Pot Masson is a woman named Roxane Mercier. Does her name ring a bell?


It does not ring a bell but I am wondering if this is biker related not sure though.
The area where this bistro is located is a french neighborhood. That area years ago,used to be Devils Disciples territory who lost in a biker war against the Popeyes that were backed by the HA.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/20/16 05:44 PM

Originally Posted By: pmac
So i would imagine frank cotronis sons were inducted into the bonanno family when frank sr was still the capo during the 90tys even thou the rizzutos had the power. Are the controni kids made men? I would think the pops probaly asked massino and did the inductions themselves up there.


Francesco was an important figure in the organisation so that he was made in the 90s makes sense.

Francesco was in charge of his father's drug network. He travelled to Columbia in February, 1995 and met with Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela and Miguel Rodriguez Orejuela, the heads of the Cali Cartel. They met at Miguel's posh home and discussed setting up a major cocaine pipeline from Columbia to Canada. Francesco was also seen meeting major drug traffickers at the Villa Sorrento hotel in Mexico, which is co-owned by his father. He would run the network until Frank Sr. was released from jail on September 28, 1995.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/21/16 01:45 AM

Just because the kids dealt in drugs doesn't mean they were made into the mafia. There's just not much evidence to support Frank Cotroni's sons being made, Paolo for one, wasn't. And the Cotroni children were involved in the drug business long before the 90's, from his two sons, all the way down to his daughter and son-in-law. They were all involved in cocaine & hashish trafficking. Francesco was also imprisoned for murder in the 80's along with Real Simard & Claude Faber, for the murder of Giuseppe Montegano inside Francesco's club. It should be noted that Frank Cotroni Sr. at one point in '97 had direct contact to the Cali Cartel. Quite frankly, neither Frank Sr. nor Francesco (Frank Jr.) needed the Bonannos.
Posted By: thebigfella

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/21/16 01:57 AM

Sorry for the interruption, but when does the leonardo rizzuto trial start?
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/21/16 02:14 AM

I had no idea, their original family name is not Cotroni, but Cotrone.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/21/16 02:39 AM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
Nicola Spagnolo, the son of Vincenzo Spagnolo (who was killed this past October), has a contract on his head.

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/12/14/un-contrat-sur-la-tete-du-membre-de-la-mafia-nic-spagnolo


Did anyone read the May 11, 2013 French-language article to which I've linked below when it was originally published in La Presse?

http://www.pressreader.com/canada/la-presse/20130511/281702612228851

I'm surprised to find Nicola Spagnolo among the many witnesses the prosecution wanted to testify in a preliminary phase of Sal Montagna's murder trial. Spagnolo may have been either friendly with or hostile to Montagna--in my opinion only, very likely the latter.

The contract that Spagnolo is reported to have on his head probably has to do at least in part with his desire to avenge his father's death. The same might also be said about the imprisoned Liborio Cun-trera. But this assumes that the sons even know who was behind or directly involved in their fathers' murders.
Posted By: Stubbs

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/21/16 04:16 PM

I remember that Alfonso Caruana of the C.untrera-Caruana clan was arrested back in 1998 in Woodbridge outside of Toronto and he apparently lived there. Are there quite a bit of mobbed-up Sicilians in Toronto as well? I wonder if the C.untrera-Caruanas had a lot of connections in Toronto and, if so, they must've lost a lot of power for Agostino C.untrera (who lived in Montreal) to be killed back in 2010. Either that, or they still had their power but the rival faction to the Rizzutos still wanted them taken out so they could takeover.

Also, how powerful was Alfonso Caruana? The media has made him out to be this huge Godfather, but that might've just been hype. He's in Italy serving time now if I'm not mistaken?

So many unanswered questions, but I'm beginning to think that the Rizzutos were not structured anything like the NY families and were more like the families in Sicily or even more like the drug cartels like Sinaloa, meaning more of a looser federation of different groups and interests as opposed to a structured, hierarchical organization... but I could be wrong.
Posted By: Stubbs

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/21/16 04:20 PM

This article implies the C.untrera-Cauranas have had ties in the Toronto area for decade, but it's odd that they weren't well connected enough to the Ndrangheta to avoid the Montreal war... if the Ndrangheta was involved.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/21/16 07:19 PM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ge-de-laval.php

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/molotov-cocktail-pitched-at-wyte-lounge-in-laval


A Molotov cocktail was launched in a commercial building in Laval after the bars closed.

The target location was the Wyte Lounge Restaurant located at 378 Curé-Labelle Boulevard in the Chomedey neighborhood.

It was a fire alarm that alerted the firefighters around 3:30 on Wednesday morning. They quickly detected smells of accelerating and a broken window.

However, the damage is limited to the trade concerned, so that the adjacent businesses were able to open their doors normally in the morning.

The case was transferred to investigators from the Laval Police Service.

Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/21/16 07:37 PM

Originally Posted By: Stubbs
I remember that Alfonso Caruana of the C.untrera-Caruana clan was arrested back in 1998 in Woodbridge outside of Toronto and he apparently lived there. Are there quite a bit of mobbed-up Sicilians in Toronto as well? I wonder if the C.untrera-Caruanas had a lot of connections in Toronto and, if so, they must've lost a lot of power for Agostino C.untrera (who lived in Montreal) to be killed back in 2010. Either that, or they still had their power but the rival faction to the Rizzutos still wanted them taken out so they could takeover.

Also, how powerful was Alfonso Caruana? The media has made him out to be this huge Godfather, but that might've just been hype. He's in Italy serving time now if I'm not mistaken?

So many unanswered questions, but I'm beginning to think that the Rizzutos were not structured anything like the NY families and were more like the families in Sicily or even more like the drug cartels like Sinaloa, meaning more of a looser federation of different groups and interests as opposed to a structured, hierarchical organization... but I could be wrong.



Alfonso is in prison, but his brother Gerlando lives in the Montreal area.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/22/16 01:24 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ge-de-laval.php

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/molotov-cocktail-pitched-at-wyte-lounge-in-laval


A Molotov cocktail was launched in a commercial building in Laval after the bars closed.

The target location was the Wyte Lounge Restaurant located at 378 Curé-Labelle Boulevard in the Chomedey neighborhood.

It was a fire alarm that alerted the firefighters around 3:30 on Wednesday morning. They quickly detected smells of accelerating and a broken window.

However, the damage is limited to the trade concerned, so that the adjacent businesses were able to open their doors normally in the morning.

The case was transferred to investigators from the Laval Police Service.



Arab owned in a heavy Greek middle eastern neighbourhood
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 12:57 AM

This past October, Franco Roberti--Italy's national antimafia and antiterrorism public prosecutor--along with a delegation of Italian judges who are part of La Commissione Parlamentare Antimafia (the Italian Parliament's antimafia commission), visited Canada for a series of meetings with Canada's Minister of Justice and other counterparts.

Roberti and the delegation were told that between 2009 and the current year, there were 20 crimes in Canada attributed to clashes between mafia groups (mostly 'ndranghetisti versus Siclians) and to clashes between 'ndrangheta factions vying for control of both illicit and legal activities.

Link to Italian-language article published two days ago:

http://www.ansa.it/legalita/rubriche/spe...48c492c538.html
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 12:55 PM

This article further confirms what some of us thought all along that the ndrangheta was behind this feud in Montreal. What is also interesting is the mention of clashes between ndrangheta factions. Probably referring to the Figliomeni/Coluccio incident in Toronto that resulted in Carmine Verduci's death.

Good article.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 01:19 PM

Great article thanks.

Would be interesting to see which of the ndrangheta cells was most motivated in pushing out Rizzuto and what relationship do the Violis currently have with the camera di controllo
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 01:58 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Great article thanks.

Would be interesting to see which of the ndrangheta cells was most motivated in pushing out Rizzuto and what relationship do the Violis currently have with the camera di controllo


For the Violi's to be participating in the feud, they must of gotten the green light from the camera di controllo. With regards to which cells would have the motivation,I would be very interested to know myself. I have two that come to mind that interacted with Rizzuto for good and for bad but it remains to be seen.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 02:16 PM

There has been mention that Bruzzese was in constant communication with Rizzuto and his top men. Bruzzese was head of the Grotteria locale which I think is subordinate to Siderno and Rocella-Gioiosa in terms of power and influence.

I had read that the Commissos always had an uneasy relationship with the Rizzuto clan.

Ciment whatso your take?
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 02:40 PM

Those two are the one's I had in mind. The book Business or Blood on page 184 mentions that the Coluccio's were central to the Ndrangheta push into Montreal. Bruzzese(Coluccio's father-in-law) at one point had good relations with Rizzuto but I guess they decided to take advantage when he was jailed. The book also confirms that the Commisso/Rizzuto relations were not good. The Commisso's are related by marriage to the Luppino's which puts the Violi's in good standing.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 02:47 PM

The killing of Giordano the strongman of the Rizzutos was probably also a warning to Arcadi.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 02:53 PM

Funny enough both Arcadi and Giordano are from Reggio but central to the Rizzuto organization
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 03:05 PM

On page 78 of Business or Blood we read:

"It was around the time of Della Peschios killing in 2009 that wealthy montreal cafe owner and desjardins protégé Mirarchi quietly made a trip to Woodbridge to attend the opening of a modest eatery in the heart of Ndrangheta territory, territory where his was becoming a familiar face as Desjardins group sought to firm up its Calabrian connections. The York region restaurant was the business of a relative of Antonio Commisso."
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 03:19 PM

Originally Posted By: thebigfella
Sorry for the interruption, but when does the leonardo rizzuto trial start?


The justice system works very slowly maybe in 2017, he will stay in prison untill the trial anyway. Not sure what the charges are but I think Leo will only be convicted of arms and cocaine possession, not trafficking.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 04:32 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
On page 78 of Business or Blood we read:

"It was around the time of Della Peschios killing in 2009 that wealthy montreal cafe owner and desjardins protégé Mirarchi quietly made a trip to Woodbridge to attend the opening of a modest eatery in the heart of Ndrangheta territory, territory where his was becoming a familiar face as Desjardins group sought to firm up its Calabrian connections. The York region restaurant was the business of a relative of Antonio Commisso."


I think we are on the right track.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 04:36 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Funny enough both Arcadi and Giordano are from Reggio but central to the Rizzuto organization


You would think Arcadi being calabrese would understand the power of the Ndrangheta. Del Balso is also a calabrese I believe.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 05:10 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: eurodave
Funny enough both Arcadi and Giordano are from Reggio but central to the Rizzuto organization


You would think Arcadi being calabrese would understand the power of the Ndrangheta. Del Balso is also a calabrese I believe.


Even some of his family members back in Sant'Agata del Bianco are members of the 'Ndrangheta.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 05:26 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
On page 78 of Business or Blood we read:

"It was around the time of Della Peschios killing in 2009 that wealthy montreal cafe owner and desjardins protégé Mirarchi quietly made a trip to Woodbridge to attend the opening of a modest eatery in the heart of Ndrangheta territory, territory where his was becoming a familiar face as Desjardins group sought to firm up its Calabrian connections. The York region restaurant was the business of a relative of Antonio Commisso."


page 32 makes it more clear: Sept.17,2009 man connected to powerful Commisso crime family of the GTA flew to Montreal to meet with Mirarchi among others.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 05:26 PM

Good point
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 06:14 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: eurodave
Funny enough both Arcadi and Giordano are from Reggio but central to the Rizzuto organization


You would think Arcadi being calabrese would understand the power of the Ndrangheta. Del Balso is also a calabrese I believe.


Del Balso is from Bari like Sollecito
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 07:57 PM

If this was a 'ndrangheta organized take-over from the get-go it seems that they had enough respect (or fear) for Vito Rizzuto to allow him reclaim what was his and let him have his revenge... A little peculiar isn't it?

I can only imagine how that meeting in Toronto between Vito Rizzuto, the Calabrians and reps from NewYork went on. Obviously they struck some kind of a peace agreement in which Rizzuto was given carte blanche to kill his enemies, at least in Montreal. I state this because between his return and sudden death basically all victims were known enemies and there was no retaliation at the time. Yet I wonder why they didn't just kill him and be done with it. Cut the head of the snake so to speak. The most logical explanation is respect or fear or a combination. Ofcourse everyone also knew Rizzuto was the only one still alive who had proven to be capable to lead and bring stability among the factions. Perhaps it was only a practical decision given that the coup at the time had failed and had only created more turmoil.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 07:59 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
The killing of Giordano the strongman of the Rizzutos was probably also a warning to Arcadi.


Seems that way now don't it? I was interested in seeing which side he was on but when Giordano was killed right away and the fact that Arcadi seemed to stay loyal to Vito when he was away that they are all targets now. I don't see Arcadi going away quietly though. Isn't he still in prison after they put him back in after Giordano was killed?
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 08:23 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
If this was a 'ndrangheta organized take-over from the get-go it seems that they had enough respect (or fear) for Vito Rizzuto to reclaim what was his and let him have his revenge... A little peculiar isn't it?


This is a good question,I once asked myself that very question but after rationalizing this I came to ask myself what valuable or high ranking targets did the Ndrangheta lose in this power struggle? Then the answer I came up with is none. The people that got killed are all associates from Montreal and none from the Toronto ndrangheta clans. I admit Vito put up a good fight in Montreal while he was alive but in reality his problem stemmed from elsewhere.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 08:42 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
If this was a 'ndrangheta organized take-over from the get-go it seems that they had enough respect (or fear) for Vito Rizzuto to reclaim what was his and let him have his revenge... A little peculiar isn't it?


This is a good question,I once asked myself that very question but after rationalizing this I came to ask myself what valuable or high ranking targets did the Ndrangheta lose in this power struggle? Then the answer I came up with is none. The people that got killed are all associates from Montreal and none from the Toronto ndrangheta clans. I admit Vito put up a good fight in Montreal while he was alive but in reality his problem stemmed from elsewhere.


Good point as the only major murder in Toronto was between ndrangheta cells. The blood was spilled primarily in Montreal
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 08:46 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: eurodave
Funny enough both Arcadi and Giordano are from Reggio but central to the Rizzuto organization


You would think Arcadi being calabrese would understand the power of the Ndrangheta. Del Balso is also a calabrese I believe.


Del Balso is from Bari like Sollecito


http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-ne...project-colisee

The article refers Del Balso, caught on tape ,as being from Calabria
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 08:55 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
If this was a 'ndrangheta organized take-over from the get-go it seems that they had enough respect (or fear) for Vito Rizzuto to reclaim what was his and let him have his revenge... A little peculiar isn't it?


This is a good question,I once asked myself that very question but after rationalizing this I came to ask myself what valuable or high ranking targets did the Ndrangheta lose in this power struggle? Then the answer I came up with is none. The people that got killed are all associates from Montreal and none from the Toronto ndrangheta clans. I admit Vito put up a good fight in Montreal while he was alive but in reality his problem stemmed from elsewhere.


Good point as the only major murder in Toronto was between ndrangheta cells. The blood was spilled primarily in Montreal


Maybe some of the Calabrian victims in Montreal like Tony Callocchia and Moreno Gallo have ties to 'ndrangheta.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 09:01 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: eurodave
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
If this was a 'ndrangheta organized take-over from the get-go it seems that they had enough respect (or fear) for Vito Rizzuto to reclaim what was his and let him have his revenge... A little peculiar isn't it?


This is a good question,I once asked myself that very question but after rationalizing this I came to ask myself what valuable or high ranking targets did the Ndrangheta lose in this power struggle? Then the answer I came up with is none. The people that got killed are all associates from Montreal and none from the Toronto ndrangheta clans. I admit Vito put up a good fight in Montreal while he was alive but in reality his problem stemmed from elsewhere.


Good point as the only major murder in Toronto was between ndrangheta cells. The blood was spilled primarily in Montreal


Maybe some of the Calabrian victims in Montreal like Tony Callocchia and Moreno Gallo have ties to 'ndrangheta.


At most they might have some business interests with ndrangheta men but they're not ndrangheta members. Theyre both montrealers that were part of the local syndicate. Moreno didn't even stay in italy very long after extradition
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 09:10 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave

At most they might have some business interests with ndrangheta men but they're not ndrangheta members. Theyre both montrealers that were part of the local syndicate. Moreno didn't even stay in italy very long after extradition


Yes, but the ties are clear Gallo and Montagna had a meeting with the Violis in Toronto.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 09:21 PM

Yes they did meet with the Violi's but it does not make them Ndrangheta members. They were part of the consortium to take out the Rizzuto's then there was a split between Desjardin/Mirarchi and Montagna/Arcuri. Gallo sided with Montagna after that split.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 09:30 PM

No they weren't made into 'ndrangheta, but you have to look at the relations between cosa nostra and 'ndrangheta. They are all Uomini d'Onore so it's not that black and white. Look at the wedding anniversary of Paolo C untrera.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 09:42 PM

Sorry, Hollander I may have missed the point your making. Eurodave or I never said there was no relationship or ties between the Cosa Nostra and the Ndrangheta.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 09:53 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Sorry, Hollander I may have missed the point your making. Eurodave or I never said there was no relationship or ties between the Cosa Nostra and the Ndrangheta.


I know, it was aimed at the media who are often talking about a 'ndrangheta take-over or Sicilians vs Calabrians. Which is bs IMO.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/23/16 10:57 PM

The town of Hamilton is rough, but they stay often under the radar.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/24/16 05:15 PM


Merry Christmas & Buon Natale to everyone !
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/24/16 10:05 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment

Merry Christmas & Buon Natale to everyone !


Joyeux Noël !
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/26/16 02:23 PM

Deux tentatives d’incendies criminels dans des restaurants

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12...des-restaurants
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/26/16 02:43 PM

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/montreal-molotov-cocktails-1.3912718?cmp=rss

English article
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/26/16 04:26 PM

I'm a bit perplexed by these two incidents as the establishments are kind of hipster joints...upper middle class and very French
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/26/16 09:59 PM

Tomorrow in Grumo Appula, in the province of Bari, they will hold a mass in memory of Rocco Sollecito, shot dead a few months ago in Montreal.


Posted By: pmac

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/27/16 12:42 AM

I read on her that vito rizzuto was playing golf before he died with that guy joe dimaulos brother. Did he take vitos side over his own brothers. Last question out of all the montreal bonannos, sal vitale said there was 20around the year 2000. Are they all dead? By murder or old age. Surposely frank lino said some politician was a made guy in there crew ive never heard he died. And finally so its a deffinit no any of the cotroni sons were inducted by the father or rizzuto?
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/27/16 12:15 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
Tomorrow in Grumo Appula, in the province of Bari, they will hold a mass in memory of Rocco Sollecito, shot dead a few months ago in Montreal.




"Italian priest sparks scandal after inviting public to mass for slain Canada mafia boss"

http://www.thelocal.it/20161227/uproar-as-priest-invites-public-to-mass-for-slain-canada-mafia-boss
Posted By: GangstersInc

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/27/16 02:36 PM

Public church mass in memory of slain Montreal Mafia boss Rocco Sollecito canceled – Mass was to be held in Italy

http://gangstersinc.ning.com/profiles/bl...ia-boss-rocco-s
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/27/16 09:48 PM

"Church mass for murdered Canadian mafioso Rocco Sollecito kiboshed by Catholic authorities"

http://www.nationalpost.com/m/wp/news/ca...lic-authorities

"Mafia boss Mass nixed"

http://www.ansa.it/english/news/2016/12/...c5b66405cb.html
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/27/16 09:57 PM

"Planned mass in Italy for reputed Montreal mobster is scrapped after outcry"

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/News/12597029/story.html

This last part of the Canadian Press article seems to contain erroneous information:

A retired Montreal police investigator familiar with the Mafia told The Canadian Press Sollecito was Vito Rizzuto’s “right-hand man” and was blamed by some in the Rizzuto clan for not doing enough to protect the family when Vito was in prison.

Sollecito reportedly had been making money on his own and had fallen out with the Rizzutos.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/27/16 11:51 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia
"Planned mass in Italy for reputed Montreal mobster is scrapped after outcry"

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/News/12597029/story.html

This last part of the Canadian Press article seems to contain erroneous information:

A retired Montreal police investigator familiar with the Mafia told The Canadian Press Sollecito was Vito Rizzuto’s “right-hand man” and was blamed by some in the Rizzuto clan for not doing enough to protect the family when Vito was in prison.

Sollecito reportedly had been making money on his own and had fallen out with the Rizzutos.


Someone seems to be confused with either Di Maulo or Arcadi. Note that it was rumored on the old RD forum that Arcadi had fallen out of favor because he had been making deals on his own. Then again, people can easily spread false rumors on the internet.

Whatever the case, what this article states about Sollecito doesn't make sense.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/28/16 12:01 AM

Arcadis falling out amongst some of the Sicilian members of the Montreal Mafia was attributed to his closeness with the Calabrians. At least thats whats stated in Business Or Blood.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/28/16 12:24 AM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Originally Posted By: antimafia
"Planned mass in Italy for reputed Montreal mobster is scrapped after outcry"

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/News/12597029/story.html

This last part of the Canadian Press article seems to contain erroneous information:

A retired Montreal police investigator familiar with the Mafia told The Canadian Press Sollecito was Vito Rizzuto’s “right-hand man” and was blamed by some in the Rizzuto clan for not doing enough to protect the family when Vito was in prison.

Sollecito reportedly had been making money on his own and had fallen out with the Rizzutos.


Someone seems to be confused with either Di Maulo or Arcadi. Note that it was rumored on the old RD forum that Arcadi had fallen out of favor because he had been making deals on his own. Then again, people can easily spread false rumors on the internet.

Whatever the case, what this article states about Sollecito doesn't make sense.


I agree with you Sonny Black it makes no sense, if that were the case V.Rizzuto would of taken him out when he got released from prison. Furthermore, after Vito's death, Sollecito's son would not have been allowed to sit at the round table and assume a leader's role.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/28/16 01:22 AM

It's pretty interesting that the Sollecito family has major business interests in Italy.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/28/16 01:37 AM

Before Rizzuto died , he too had a lot of business interests in Italy . So not that surprising.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/28/16 12:26 PM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...-a-montreal.php

Montreal Fire bombings on the rise 2016
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/28/16 01:20 PM

If it's true that Solid Gold became Sollecito, then I would list the rival spots as:

Beaches...former de vito colapelle hangout

Linguini

The other places are all tied to the Rizzuto clan somehow
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/28/16 03:22 PM

http://www.giuseppelumia.it/2014/evoluzi...italoamericana/

The Italians are keeping abreast of the situation in Canada
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/28/16 06:29 PM

I have to agree, no way did Rocco Sollecito fall out of favor with Vito. It just doesn't make sense plus the fact him and Vito were very close for a very long time. I would definitely agree that if that was true for anyone it would be Arcadi over Sollecito and we still don't really know what side Frank is on.

Same for Stefano becoming a leading figure too, no way would Vito trust the family after his death if Rocco had turned on him.

And Sinatra is right, Vito did have some business dealings in Italy/Sicily so it only makes sense that what seems to be his best friend would have some dealings there too.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/28/16 11:47 PM

Yves Lavigne says the territorial push of the Hells Angels into the Maritimes is an attempt to ensure they control the drug market from coast to coast.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/hells-angels-make-return-to-maritimes-1.3913710
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/29/16 01:09 PM

http://www.985fm.ca/actualites/nouvelles...vsxzb7c.twitter

"The reign of Rizzuto and Sicilians is over in Montreal" - journalist Daniel Renaud
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/29/16 02:41 PM

Great article Cement!

Daniel seems to always bring great knowledge and perspective.

I wish he would of mentioned those 2-3 leaders lol!

I have a feeling Scoppa is one of them
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/29/16 04:08 PM

Yea, so do I . But I'm just repeating myself at this point. Anybody mind posting a translation of that article?
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/29/16 04:17 PM

"The reign of the Rizzuto and the Sicilians is over ...
"The reign of Rizzuto and Sicilians is over in Montreal" - journalist Daniel Renaud
Published by Jacques Thériault for 98.5 fm on Wednesday December 28, 2016 at 19h34.

Funeral of Vito Rizzuto on December 30, 2013 / PC - Graham Hughes, archive

(98.5 FM) - Since the beginning of the year 2016, the Montreal Police Department (SPVM) has counted 13 arson attacks, don 12 since September, linked to clan wars within the Mafia.

Journalist Daniel Renaud, a criminal affairs specialist with the daily La Presse, spoke with Marie-Claude Lavallée on Le Québec now on Wednesday afternoon.

"It is clear that this expresses a renewed tensions within the mafia," said Daniel Renaud. The mafia has been shaken by internal conflicts for several years, and it continues, that's what it means. "

Since the death of the Sicilian godfather Vito Rizzuto three years ago, confusion seems to prevail among the various clans for the conquest of power. According to Daniel Renaud, none of the leaders of clans currently stands out to be identified as the real leader of the criminal organization.

"We have people who are leaders of influential or important clans who struggle," he says. The SPVM evaluates that it is a fight with two clans. They are opponents of the Rizzuto, to show to the Rizzuto, but also to the Sicilians that their reign is finished. "

On the other hand, Renaud believes that there could be more than two clans in the war within the Mafia. The SPVM would lose a bit of conjecture, since the names of two or three chiefs are currently circulating

"One thing that everyone agrees is that the rule of the Rizzuto and Sicilians is over in Montreal," says Daniel Renaud. It is the end of an era; The Sollecito family who had taken over from Rizzoto no longer had much strength. It is a predominantly Calabrian Italian organized crime that will eventually settle in Montreal. "

Since several chiefs of clans are subject to police surveillance, the situation remains unclear as to which leader is likely to emerge.

According to Daniel Renaud, whoever takes control will have no choice but to deal with other criminal organizations in Quebec, including the Hell's Angels; It was Vito Rizzuto's way of doing things.

"He will not have a choice," says Renaud. The officials of the Sûreté du Québec (SQ) told us recently; The biggest criminal organization now, is the Hell's Angels. The future head of the Mafia will have no choice but to continue to do business with them in order to remain in office. "
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/29/16 04:28 PM

Thanks Hollander.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/29/16 04:49 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Great article Cement!

Daniel seems to always bring great knowledge and perspective.

I wish he would of mentioned those 2-3 leaders lol!

I have a feeling Scoppa is one of them


Yes, I hate when they do not mention names. For who is left in Montreal to assume a leadership role, I agree the Scoppa clan would be one of them, the other might be the Cotroni clan which would include Vanelli,Mirarchi,Cotroni's. The third clan is what puzzles me,there is the DeVito clan ? I can't see the Sicilian clan going away, they seem to have it against the Rizzuto's loyalists only. Will the Sicilian clan be transformed under a new leadership with the help of the Caruana/Cun trera ? Then if we look outside of Montreal, there is the Ontario Ndrangheta that will want to plant their flag in Montreal as well. It will be an interesting year(2017).
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/29/16 06:39 PM

I wonder if the remnants of the Cotroni Di Maulo clan is also lumped with Desjardins Mirarchi. Then you have to consider the old De Vito crew and friends.

Old timers like Mucci and Vanelli could be part of any of those groups or against.

As for the remaining Sicilian loyalists, I think they'll continue to operate much like the cotroni clan did after the Rizzutos took over in the 80s.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/29/16 07:52 PM

But didn't he say they were done before Vito got out of prison too? Or am I thinking of someone else?

I want to see Arcadi, Del Balso and Rizzuto out before I claim victory over the old faction. You just never know these days, especially up there. They will definitely have to "come back" to win this one though.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/29/16 08:38 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
But didn't he say they were done before Vito got out of prison too? Or am I thinking of someone else?

I want to see Arcadi, Del Balso and Rizzuto out before I claim victory over the old faction. You just never know these days, especially up there. They will definitely have to "come back" to win this one though.


Yes you are correct,the Rizzuto clan received heavy casualties prior to his release & that is why some journalist thought it was the end; but much to everybody's surprise Vito Rizzuto made a comeback. Now that he is deceased I do not see anyone in the Rizzuto clan that could mount a second counter attack unless they receive help from outside sources. Arcadi does not have the same leadership capabilities that Vito had,as matter of fact he made things worse when he was in charge.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/29/16 08:47 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
I wonder if the remnants of the Cotroni Di Maulo clan is also lumped with Desjardins Mirarchi. Then you have to consider the old De Vito crew and friends.

Old timers like Mucci and Vanelli could be part of any of those groups or against.

As for the remaining Sicilian loyalists, I think they'll continue to operate much like the cotroni clan did after the Rizzutos took over in the 80s.

I do not know if the Rizzuto clan will be ready to stop fighting. You have the likes of Liborio Cun trera, Leonardo Rizzuto, Calogero Renda, Stefano Solecito, Nicola Spagnolo & more;may want to avenge their father's deaths. There has been too much blood spilled.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/29/16 09:41 PM

You never know. People doubted Leonardo and his comparisons to Michael Corleone (his involvement) up until the day of the project MASTIF-MAGOT busts, then everybody was like "oh wow, no way". He could pull a Michael Corleone forreal and stage a miraculous comeback and save the family name. Highly unlikely, but one can dream.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/30/16 12:50 PM

Another Italian article about the Rizzuto clan.

http://comunicalo.it/2016/12/30/mafia-interrogazione-lumia-al-governo-sul-clan-rizzuto/
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/30/16 01:47 PM

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2016/12...ien-hells-angel

Michel "the animal" Smith gets 10,000 dollar/month pension from the Hells Angels.

Friday, 30 December 2016 06:30
Update Friday, 30 December 2016 06:30
ERIC THIBAULT AND FÉLIX SÉGUIN

Le Journal de Montréal and Investigative Office

The Hells Angels have just awarded a golden pension to one of their most influential members in Quebec, who will receive a $ 10,000 monthly pension after 23 years of loyal service.
It is under this lucrative deal that Michel "L'Animal" Smith, a pillar of the South chapter, has decided to withdraw from the motorcycle gang in recent months, according to information obtained by our Investigative Bureau .André "Curly" Sauvageau, an ex-Rock Machine among the most powerful Hells in Montreal, would have been asked to pay him his monthly starting premium, based on receipts from the criminal activities of the club, according to our sources.
" A lot of money "
"It did not matter to many, in the club, to pay him such an amount. But it shows us that the Hells have a lot, a lot of money, "a source familiar with the case said.
Those who previously bore the name of Michel Lajoie-Smith withdrew from the band "with honor" - or in "good standing", in the jargon of the Hells.
Ironically, the 54-year-old ex-motorcyclist received his patches as a member in good standing on December 5, 1993, the same evening as Sylvain Boulanger, who became the "$ 3 million" informer of Operation SharQc and the enemy Juror of the gang.
With the Mafia
According to our information, Smith would have played a leading role in the narcotics market, even though he has never been convicted of drug trafficking.
According to court records Le Journal received a copy, Smith was presumably one of only two Hells at the executive table that the motorcyclists had formed with the Italian mafia to control the cocaine market in the Greater Montreal area, 2008.
According to information from the SQ and the RCMP, Smith led the sales territories west of the territory alongside some mafiosi, including m Raynald Desjardins, detained since 2011 for plotting the murder of the aspirant Godfather Salvatore Montagna.
However, no drug charges were laid against them.
Strategic expansion
The police believe Smith also sponsored the first chapter of the Hells Angels in Ecuador last spring. In March, it was observed in the capital of Quito at the party where the Devils Clowns officially joined the ranks of the Hells.
The establishment of a section in this country is strategic since Ecuador is one of the main places through which the cocaine produced by its neighbor, Colombia, transits, before being exported to North America, according to the CIA.
Smith had made numerous contacts in South America, having spent three years on the run in Panama following Operation SharQC in 2009.
Once extradited to Quebec, "L'Animal", also known as "Gros Mike," did well in court. After three years in pre-trial detention, he found himself guilty of conspiracy to murder on March 17, 2015. His murder charges were dropped and Smith was released from prison.
THEY KEEP AN EYE ON THEIR PENSIONERS
"You can not withdraw from the Hells Angels and not keep in touch with them. Because a certain moment, surely you're going to get yourself killed. Sure and certain."
This is at least the opinion of Dayle Fredette, who was a member of the Hells of the Quebec Chapter for 12 years - and who knew "Gros Mike" Smith while they were both held in Donnacona's maximum security penitentiary - Before returning his jacket and collaborating in Operation SharQc with the police.
Fredette told the Sûreté du Québec (SQ) in 2011 that retired members of the gang "on good terms" must nevertheless "keep in touch with the club all the time".
" A divorce "
Several of them even remained "business partners" with motorcyclists, especially in the narcotics trade, and continued to pay a percentage of their revenues to the band.
The other SharQc informer, Sylvain Boulanger, compared his retirement from the Hells to "a divorce".
"When it does not work, we leave or there are some who are helped to leave. I had to leave. [...] With a criminal organization like this, one must expect everything. You can never be sure of staying alive. And I went to see you to sleep better, "said Boulanger in one of the statements he delivered to the SQ and that Le Journal had access.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/30/16 03:28 PM

Interesting article Ciment especially about the part that mentions Desjardins and the 2008 territory division between the hells and mafia.

Clearly the hells don't care who's in charge and were willing to work with Vito's rivals as early as 2008.

the same might be true today
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/30/16 03:35 PM

Originally Posted By: Hollander


The Italian prosecutors and media seem to always paint the picture as a Siderno Group vs Rizzuto clan when it comes to the last few years.

The article also mentions 14 Locali, which is quite a lot and if true, no wonder they calabrians have the power and influence to do as they wish.

Can someone correct me if I've read that one locale is made up of at least 30-40 members?

Best part in all of this blood and war is our inability to pinpoint one central figure within the GTA who could be the main culprit.

Also, the trail of blood has 99% been within Montreal
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/30/16 05:02 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Originally Posted By: Hollander


The Italian prosecutors and media seem to always paint the picture as a Siderno Group vs Rizzuto clan when it comes to the last few years.

The article also mentions 14 Locali, which is quite a lot and if true, no wonder they calabrians have the power and influence to do as they wish.

Can someone correct me if I've read that one locale is made up of at least 30-40 members?

Best part in all of this blood and war is our inability to pinpoint one central figure within the GTA who could be the main culprit.

Also, the trail of blood has 99% been within Montreal


The only way I can see the Siderno group may be involved is via the Violi brothers.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/30/16 07:29 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Interesting article Ciment especially about the part that mentions Desjardins and the 2008 territory division between the hells and mafia.

Clearly the hells don't care who's in charge and were willing to work with Vito's rivals as early as 2008.

the same might be true today


Most of the rivals if not all,had good relations with the HA. Desjardins had good relations with the exception of one Mom Boucher who was planning a hit from prison on him. Someone must of paid good money for this.
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/30/16 07:32 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Yes you are correct,the Rizzuto clan received heavy casualties prior to his release & that is why some journalist thought it was the end; but much to everybody's surprise Vito Rizzuto made a comeback. Now that he is deceased I do not see anyone in the Rizzuto clan that could mount a second counter attack unless they receive help from outside sources. Arcadi does not have the same leadership capabilities that Vito had,as matter of fact he made things worse when he was in charge.


That's my point as well. I just think it's "too early" to post the Rizzuto's obituary.

Originally Posted By: Ciment
I do not know if the Rizzuto clan will be ready to stop fighting. You have the likes of Liborio Cun trera, Leonardo Rizzuto, Calogero Renda, Stefano Solecito, Nicola Spagnolo & more;may want to avenge their father's deaths. There has been too much blood spilled.


Agreed and that's why I think they will continue the fighting. I just don't see all of them laying down.

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
You never know. People doubted Leonardo and his comparisons to Michael Corleone (his involvement) up until the day of the project MASTIF-MAGOT busts, then everybody was like "oh wow, no way". He could pull a Michael Corleone forreal and stage a miraculous comeback and save the family name. Highly unlikely, but one can dream.


I'm still eating crow on that one. I knew he was "involved" but I never thought he was in it deep enough to be the boss (or share it) at least to the point that the others would follow without trying to kill him.

Like you say though and I agree on, their comeback chances are against them but I'm not counting them out until they are dead or I am one lol
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/30/16 07:48 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Originally Posted By: Hollander


The Italian prosecutors and media seem to always paint the picture as a Siderno Group vs Rizzuto clan when it comes to the last few years.

The article also mentions 14 Locali, which is quite a lot and if true, no wonder they calabrians have the power and influence to do as they wish.

Can someone correct me if I've read that one locale is made up of at least 30-40 members?

Best part in all of this blood and war is our inability to pinpoint one central figure within the GTA who could be the main culprit.

Also, the trail of blood has 99% been within Montreal


The Italian prosecutors seem to be well informed compared to the Canadian RCMP.It was the Italian authorities that informed the RCMP that there were 9 locale in Toronto. Back then most medias & authorities reported there were 3 or 4. Now it seems they have grown to 14 in Canada. It would be interesting to know where the remaining 5 are located. Maybe they established some locale in Montreal ?
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/30/16 08:52 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: eurodave
Originally Posted By: Hollander


The Italian prosecutors and media seem to always paint the picture as a Siderno Group vs Rizzuto clan when it comes to the last few years.

The article also mentions 14 Locali, which is quite a lot and if true, no wonder they calabrians have the power and influence to do as they wish.

Can someone correct me if I've read that one locale is made up of at least 30-40 members?

Best part in all of this blood and war is our inability to pinpoint one central figure within the GTA who could be the main culprit.

Also, the trail of blood has 99% been within Montreal


The Italian prosecutors seem to be well informed compared to the Canadian RCMP.It was the Italian authorities that informed the RCMP that there were 9 locale in Toronto. Back then most medias & authorities reported there were 3 or 4. Now it seems they have grown to 14 in Canada. It would be interesting to know where the remaining 5 are located. Maybe they established some locale in Montreal ?


14 x 20 members equals almost 300 Ndranghetisti...quite a bit if you ask me.
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/30/16 09:37 PM

A lot of interesting posts right now of the current situation and who's on who's side. Definitely reminds me of the 2009-2013 portion of the war when nobody really knew who was on what side. It later turned out that there were 2 groups against the Rizzuto's which sounds a lot like what we are seeing again now.

I saw Mucci's name mentioned a few posts ago with regards to playing a part with the old Cotroni group. It's interesting that his name was rarely mentioned in the bloody part of the war, but that one of his closest allies Moreno Gallo sided with the Montagna group, which of course was opposite of the old Cotroni group. I'm confused as to how he would be described... I've read where he was a part of the Cotroni clan, I've also heard that he was a lietenant of Moreno Gallo, or would he have his own clan?

It's been said before, but Arcadi and Del Baso could hold the balance of power. Not to say they would be able to take over, but they could make a deal with one of the groups to put one group solidly in front.

Does anyone have information on the following?
- Are Stefano Sollecito's 2 brothers involved in the mafia?
- Are Pietrantonio or the Arcuri brothers back involved? They were big pieces of Montagna's group
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/30/16 11:18 PM

Originally Posted By: cdn_wiseguy
A lot of interesting posts right now of the current situation and who's on who's side. Definitely reminds me of the 2009-2013 portion of the war when nobody really knew who was on what side. It later turned out that there were 2 groups against the Rizzuto's which sounds a lot like what we are seeing again now.

I saw Mucci's name mentioned a few posts ago with regards to playing a part with the old Cotroni group. It's interesting that his name was rarely mentioned in the bloody part of the war, but that one of his closest allies Moreno Gallo sided with the Montagna group, which of course was opposite of the old Cotroni group. I'm confused as to how he would be described... I've read where he was a part of the Cotroni clan, I've also heard that he was a lietenant of Moreno Gallo, or would he have his own clan?

It's been said before, but Arcadi and Del Baso could hold the balance of power. Not to say they would be able to take over, but they could make a deal with one of the groups to put one group solidly in front.

Does anyone have information on the following?
- Are Stefano Sollecito's 2 brothers involved in the mafia?
- Are Pietrantonio or the Arcuri brothers back involved? They were big pieces of Montagna's group

I believe Stefano's brothers are involved. There was mention of Mario when they seized guns and license plates and Giuseppe is mentioned in Mafia Inc.
I haven't heard much of the Arcuri's, they are laying low. Especially for having betrayed both the Rizzuto's and their rivals.
With regards with the old Cotroni clan it is hard to follow who is on what side because some jumped ship to Montagna, others remained with the Rizzuto clan and others became rivals to Rizzuto. Example, we found out about Gallo supporting Montagna because of the wiretaps. Callocchia stayed with Rizzuto, Desjardins decided to fight the Rizzuto's, the ones that remained neutral got whacked.So far I haven't read anything in the news that would identify what side Mucci and Vanelli are on. They both had an attempt on their lives.
In this Montreal feud you have Sicilians betraying Sicilians and Calabrese betraying Calabrese.



Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/30/16 11:35 PM

Thanks Ciment. I didn't realize there was an attempt on Mucci and Vanelli. How long ago was that?

Do you know any names that affiliate with Scoppa's group?
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 12:07 AM

Originally Posted By: cdn_wiseguy
Thanks Ciment. I didn't realize there was an attempt on Mucci and Vanelli. How long ago was that?

Do you know any names that affiliate with Scoppa's group?


Off the top of my head Andrew,Salvatore Scoppa: Tony Teoli, Bruno Romanelli,Mike Perna, Steve Bertrand; they have a very large crew. The Scoppa clan and Devito clan are associates.

Mucci was Dec. 2007
Vanelli was June 2,2016; they killed Angelo D'Onofrio by mistake
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 12:31 AM

Originally Posted By: cdn_wiseguy
Thanks Ciment. I didn't realize there was an attempt on Mucci and Vanelli. How long ago was that?

Do you know any names that affiliate with Scoppa's group?


http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ucci-libere.php

This article makes mention of Mucci's attempt on his life.
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 12:50 AM

Thanks again Ciment. A couple interesting things from the article. Renaud mentions that Mucci is considered to run his own cell. The other thing, was that the attempt on his life was in 2007, which was prior to the instability.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 01:07 AM

Vito was arrested in 2004. The instability started 2005.
Yes, Mucci has his own crew as mentioned in the news article.
Posted By: BronaZora

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 01:44 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: eurodave
Originally Posted By: Hollander


The Italian prosecutors and media seem to always paint the picture as a Siderno Group vs Rizzuto clan when it comes to the last few years.

The article also mentions 14 Locali, which is quite a lot and if true, no wonder they calabrians have the power and influence to do as they wish.

Can someone correct me if I've read that one locale is made up of at least 30-40 members?

Best part in all of this blood and war is our inability to pinpoint one central figure within the GTA who could be the main culprit.

Also, the trail of blood has 99% been within Montreal


The Italian prosecutors seem to be well informed compared to the Canadian RCMP.It was the Italian authorities that informed the RCMP that there were 9 locale in Toronto. Back then most medias & authorities reported there were 3 or 4. Now it seems they have grown to 14 in Canada. It would be interesting to know where the remaining 5 are located. Maybe they established some locale in Montreal ?


Can someone explain to me how so many locales can exist in one area? As I understand it, a 'ndrine is basically a family, this family can have multiple cells or crews operating in different parts of the world, if there are other 'ndrine cells operating in the same area, they form a locale together, does that sound about right? If so, how can there be 14 locales in the GTA? That's like an infestation.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 01:53 AM

The troubles for the Rizzuto clan didnt start immediately after Vito was put away. It started after Operation Coliseé, which was in 2006, where most of those guys were put away. And even then, the real instablity within the Montreal Mafia started with the death of Nicolo Jr. in '09. Dont know the reason why Mucci was shot in '07, couldve been involved, but cdn_wiseguy is right, Mucci's attempt was before all the real troubles began.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 02:20 AM

During the Charbonneau hearings in 2012 someone said Sicilian mobsters in Montreal used to make fun of Calabrian mobsters because of all their strange rules and slang.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 02:34 AM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
The troubles for the Rizzuto clan didnt start immediately after Vito was put away. It started after Operation Coliseé, which was in 2006, where most of those guys were put away. And even then, the real instablity within the Montreal Mafia started with the death of Nicolo Jr. in '09. Dont know the reason why Mucci was shot in '07, couldve been involved, but cdn_wiseguy is right, Mucci's attempt was before all the real troubles began.


Your facts are dead wrong. The instability started with the D'amico's (2005) with the kidnappings. It then progressed with the help of Sergio Piccirilli(2006) he was planning to kill N.Rizzuto but never got the green light from Toronto, and then Devito got into the picture, followed by Scoppa. D.Macri gets shot in 2006. Five from the Rizzuto clan get killed in 2007. This is the definition of instability in my books.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 02:38 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
The troubles for the Rizzuto clan didnt start immediately after Vito was put away. It started after Operation Coliseé, which was in 2006, where most of those guys were put away. And even then, the real instablity within the Montreal Mafia started with the death of Nicolo Jr. in '09. Dont know the reason why Mucci was shot in '07, couldve been involved, but cdn_wiseguy is right, Mucci's attempt was before all the real troubles began.


Your facts are dead wrong. The instability started with the D'amico's (2005) with the kidnappings. It then progressed with the help of Sergio Piccirilli(2006) he was planning to kill N.Rizzuto but never got the green light from Toronto, and then Devito got into the picture, followed by Scoppa. D.Macri gets shot in 2006. Five from the Rizzuto clan get killed in 2007. This is the definition of instability in my books.


I think it started with Johnny Bertolo (2005) who was aligned with Desjardins.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 02:47 AM

Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
The troubles for the Rizzuto clan didnt start immediately after Vito was put away. It started after Operation Coliseé, which was in 2006, where most of those guys were put away. And even then, the real instablity within the Montreal Mafia started with the death of Nicolo Jr. in '09. Dont know the reason why Mucci was shot in '07, couldve been involved, but cdn_wiseguy is right, Mucci's attempt was before all the real troubles began.


Your facts are dead wrong. The instability started with the D'amico's (2005) with the kidnappings. It then progressed with the help of Sergio Piccirilli(2006) he was planning to kill N.Rizzuto but never got the green light from Toronto, and then Devito got into the picture, followed by Scoppa. D.Macri gets shot in 2006. Five from the Rizzuto clan get killed in 2007. This is the definition of instability in my books.


I think it started with Johnny Bertolo (2005) who was aligned with Desjardins.


Correct Hollander, there was also Mike Lapolla that got killed in Mar. 2005 & Bertolo was in Aug.2005. That is why I said it started in 2005.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 02:55 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: Hollander
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
The troubles for the Rizzuto clan didnt start immediately after Vito was put away. It started after Operation Coliseé, which was in 2006, where most of those guys were put away. And even then, the real instablity within the Montreal Mafia started with the death of Nicolo Jr. in '09. Dont know the reason why Mucci was shot in '07, couldve been involved, but cdn_wiseguy is right, Mucci's attempt was before all the real troubles began.


Your facts are dead wrong. The instability started with the D'amico's (2005) with the kidnappings. It then progressed with the help of Sergio Piccirilli(2006) he was planning to kill N.Rizzuto but never got the green light from Toronto, and then Devito got into the picture, followed by Scoppa. D.Macri gets shot in 2006. Five from the Rizzuto clan get killed in 2007. This is the definition of instability in my books.


I think it started with Johnny Bertolo (2005) who was aligned with Desjardins.


Correct Hollander, there was also Mike Lapolla that got killed in Mar. 2005 & Bertolo was in Aug.2005. That is why I said it started in 2005.


I forgot that one that made the Rizzutos pretty nervous about the Haitians.
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 03:19 AM

I think you guys are both right in what you are saying. There was a lot of instability after vito went away. But I don't think the direct attacks on the rizzuto's were right away.

I may be wrong, but there was always a lot of animosity from groups outside of vito's inner circle. Those on the outside just had to go along with whatever vito said. When vito went away a lot of the animosity that always existed started to show. It was the inability of the leadership group to extinguish those fires that demonstrated an opening. It's like when the parents are away, the kids test the baby sitter. If the baby sitter can't keep control, then all hell breaks loose. Nick sr wasn't very diplomatic and arcadi/del baso/giardano tried to deal with things (like granby) through force. When other groups saw the lack of ability on behalf of the Rizzuto leadership, they saw this as an opportunity. Then to compound the problem, project colisee happened. So it was wide open for the opposition groups.

I always thought the direct attack against the rizzuto's for actual control over montreal as a whole came when del peschio was murdered.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 03:19 AM

Here is more info:
Feb. 2005 Domenico Cordelone kidnapped
Apr.2005 T.Magi kidnapped
May Leonardo D’angelo kidnapped (nephew of Vince Spagnolo wife)
May 2005 F.Martorano kidnapped
Oct. 2005 N.Varcalli kdinapped
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 03:45 AM

I for one thunk problems rooted way before that in 2000 as Vito tried to push and consolidate his power becoming a sort of boss of all bosses by taking over Ontario.

It didn't take much for the siderno group to set him straight by killing pane pinto, his main man in Toronto. That push into Ontario might have given the siderno boys Extra reasons to find unhappy campers in Montreal and unite to push the Rizzuto family out. The bigger you are, the larger the target on your back is
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 03:54 AM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: eurodave
Originally Posted By: Hollander


The Italian prosecutors and media seem to always paint the picture as a Siderno Group vs Rizzuto clan when it comes to the last few years.

The article also mentions 14 Locali, which is quite a lot and if true, no wonder they calabrians have the power and influence to do as they wish.

Can someone correct me if I've read that one locale is made up of at least 30-40 members?

Best part in all of this blood and war is our inability to pinpoint one central figure within the GTA who could be the main culprit.

Also, the trail of blood has 99% been within Montreal


The Italian prosecutors seem to be well informed compared to the Canadian RCMP.It was the Italian authorities that informed the RCMP that there were 9 locale in Toronto. Back then most medias & authorities reported there were 3 or 4. Now it seems they have grown to 14 in Canada. It would be interesting to know where the remaining 5 are located. Maybe they established some locale in Montreal ?


14 x 20 members equals almost 300 Ndranghetisti...quite a bit if you ask me.


A few years ago Italian authorities stated that there were approximately 40 members of the 'ndrangheta operating in Ontario divided among 9 clans. If there are now 14 as you say that number would probably have gone up by a few dozen. 300 members seems like an exaggeration just as some people were saying years ago that the Rizzutos had 300 made members while they had no more than 20 (Bonanno) and perhaps another dozen or so members of the Sicilian Mafia. However the Rizzutos did have hundreds of associates, a lange chunk of that comprising of footsoldiers divided among several factions but ultimately answerable to the Rizzutos. I think the Rizzutos total manpower at their height was much bigger than the manpower of the Ontario Calabrians which is why Rizzuto was able to expand into Ontario without much resistance. Times have definitely changed though, no doubt about it.

Nevertheless, I still feel like the power of the 'ndrangheta in Canada is overestimated.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 04:11 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: cdn_wiseguy
A lot of interesting posts right now of the current situation and who's on who's side. Definitely reminds me of the 2009-2013 portion of the war when nobody really knew who was on what side. It later turned out that there were 2 groups against the Rizzuto's which sounds a lot like what we are seeing again now.

I saw Mucci's name mentioned a few posts ago with regards to playing a part with the old Cotroni group. It's interesting that his name was rarely mentioned in the bloody part of the war, but that one of his closest allies Moreno Gallo sided with the Montagna group, which of course was opposite of the old Cotroni group. I'm confused as to how he would be described... I've read where he was a part of the Cotroni clan, I've also heard that he was a lietenant of Moreno Gallo, or would he have his own clan?

It's been said before, but Arcadi and Del Baso could hold the balance of power. Not to say they would be able to take over, but they could make a deal with one of the groups to put one group solidly in front.

Does anyone have information on the following?
- Are Stefano Sollecito's 2 brothers involved in the mafia?
- Are Pietrantonio or the Arcuri brothers back involved? They were big pieces of Montagna's group

I believe Stefano's brothers are involved. There was mention of Mario when they seized guns and license plates and Giuseppe is mentioned in Mafia Inc.
I haven't heard much of the Arcuri's, they are laying low. Especially for having betrayed both the Rizzuto's and their rivals.
With regards with the old Cotroni clan it is hard to follow who is on what side because some jumped ship to Montagna, others remained with the Rizzuto clan and others became rivals to Rizzuto. Example, we found out about Gallo supporting Montagna because of the wiretaps. Callocchia stayed with Rizzuto, Desjardins decided to fight the Rizzuto's, the ones that remained neutral got whacked.So far I haven't read anything in the news that would identify what side Mucci and Vanelli are on. They both had an attempt on their lives.
In this Montreal feud you have Sicilians betraying Sicilians and Calabrese betraying Calabrese.





I remember an article that stated that Callocchia was collecting payments on behalf of Montagna, but may have misinterpreted that.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 04:11 AM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/dossie...lan-rizzuto.php

Yes, I agree that the root problems started prior to 2000 because of the push into Ontario.
What I was talking about in my earlier posts was when the wheels were in motion in causing instability in Montreal; which began after Vito's arrest.In the above article the Violi's were having meetigs with Piccirilli back in 2005 and further down in the article Piccirilli wanted the green from Toronto to kill N.Rizzuto sr.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 04:19 AM

I think the 'ndrangheta simply preyed on the turmoil in Montreal, playing a divide and conquer game and indiscreetly making alliances with Rizzuto enemies. Then when Rizzuto came back they took a low profile and now they are preying on the chaos again and this time it seems they have a better change of succeeding.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 04:26 AM

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ns-un-piege.php

In earlier news articles the journalist did report Callocchia was a rival but later articles mention that he was in the Rizzuto camp and was also seen by his side. The above article mentions that.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 04:27 AM

Good summary.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 04:53 AM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
I for one thunk problems rooted way before that in 2000 as Vito tried to push and consolidate his power becoming a sort of boss of all bosses by taking over Ontario.

It didn't take much for the siderno group to set him straight by killing pane pinto, his main man in Toronto. That push into Ontario might have given the siderno boys Extra reasons to find unhappy campers in Montreal and unite to push the Rizzuto family out. The bigger you are, the larger the target on your back is


One of the two Ndrangheta members that was killed in Toronto by Panepinto is named Antonio Oppedisano. Domenico Oppedisano was appointed capo crimine in 2009, I always wondered if they were related. If they were it may share more light in the strained relationship between Montreal & Toronto.
Posted By: antimafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 06:30 AM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: eurodave
I for one thunk problems rooted way before that in 2000 as Vito tried to push and consolidate his power becoming a sort of boss of all bosses by taking over Ontario.

It didn't take much for the siderno group to set him straight by killing pane pinto, his main man in Toronto. That push into Ontario might have given the siderno boys Extra reasons to find unhappy campers in Montreal and unite to push the Rizzuto family out. The bigger you are, the larger the target on your back is


One of the two Ndrangheta members that was killed in Toronto by Panepinto is named Antonio Oppedisano. Domenico Oppedisano was appointed capo crimine in 2009, I always wondered if they were related. If they were it may share more light in the strained relationship between Montreal & Toronto.


^^^^
Antonio Oppedisano was not related to Domenico of Rosarno.

Vito Rizzuto and his father had allies in Ontario going back to the 1960s. Panepinto, who was unlikely even made, was not the most important ally of the Montreal Mafia in the year 2000. Nino Cammalleri (the uncle of Vito's wife, Giovanna), Peter Scarcella, Giacinto Arcuri, Frank Campoli (the husband of Giovanna's first cousin),  Nicola Genua,  and the Caruana-Cun treras were the far more important Sicilian associates in the GTA.

Despite what many mobwatchers think, the Commisso brothers in Toronto facilitated the expansion of the Montreal Mafia in Ontario in the late 1990s (see The Sixth Family book; doesn't matter which edition). A member of Nino Cammalleri's family married into the Commisso brothers' family in 2005/2006.

In 2001, we know that Vito chaired a meeting in the GTA in which he announced that he wanted to amalgamate Italian mafia groups in Ontario and Quebec. To think he could amalgamate all such groups would be absurd, but all of them at the meeting got on board. Members of the GTA Siderno Group were present at the meeting. We found out only last year that individuals from New York's Gambino Family were also at the meeting.

After Vito was jailed in 2004, the GTA Siderno Group's Carmelo Bruzzese continued to have contact with Francesco Arcadi for more than a year (may have been up to 16 months--I'll check my computer in the morning), as Bruzzese was instrumental in helping the Montreal Mafia in the corruption of public-works contracts in Italy.

Back in 2008, mostly Italian-language articles were published about the Operazione Orso Bruno investigation in Italy that targeted the Montreal Mafia leadership. Bruzzese, because of his close association with Vito Rizzuto, was charged with being a member of Cosa Nostra. On another forum, now essentially defunct, where board poster Hollander and I were members, he posted the odd English-language article about the investigation and Bruzzese's being arrested and charged. Back then, Hollander and I didn't know who Bruzzese was. Nor did we know of the criminal collaboration between the GTA Siderno Group, the Montreal Mafia, the GTA Sicilian drug traffickers like Genua and son Ignazio, and the Commisso clan in Calabria--all of this was revealed after the July 2010 culmination of the antindrangheta operation in Calabria, as the four-volume arrest warrants published two months later mentioned all the names and all the ties.

Past criminal ties--and even present criminal ties or family ties--do not  guarantee future collaboration. The Commisso brothers forged very close ties with Nick Rizzuto Sr. in the 1970s; the brothers felt no loyalty to Giacomo Luppino and the Violis then and later in the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, just as they felt no loyalty to Domenico Racco, whose 1983 murder by the Musitanos could easily have been prevented by the Commissos' intervention. Scarcella and Rocco Remo Commisso had been close ever since the Commissos decided not to kill Scarcella in the early 1980s. The Charbonneau Commission revealed that Domenico Arcuri Jr. had very tight ties to the Cammalleri clan in the GTA, but did that stop the Arcuri brothers from allying themselves with Montagna and Desjardins? The intermarriage between the Commissos and the Cammalleris likewise seems to have had no real effect on the decision of certain GTA Siderno Group members to exploit opportunities presented by the mob war in Montreal.

If we look again at all the events and incidents involving the Italian underworlds of Toronto and Montreal between 2000 and 2006--maybe even as late as 2008--the newer information and evidence makes you see that for every criminal venture that went well, some other venture went horribly wrong. Or there was a murder such as that of senior GTA Siderno Group figure Vincenzo Raco, whose killing may have been ordered by Arcadi.

There is even a possibility that the murders and attempted murders at the Moka cafe in Woodbridge in 2015 are a result of renewed tension between certain GTA Siderno Group members and the Montreal Mafia--just reread one of the articles published at the time that named one of the two previous owners of the cafe.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 12:05 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
The troubles for the Rizzuto clan didnt start immediately after Vito was put away. It started after Operation Coliseé, which was in 2006, where most of those guys were put away. And even then, the real instablity within the Montreal Mafia started with the death of Nicolo Jr. in '09. Dont know the reason why Mucci was shot in '07, couldve been involved, but cdn_wiseguy is right, Mucci's attempt was before all the real troubles began.


Your facts are dead wrong. The instability started with the D'amico's (2005) with the kidnappings. It then progressed with the help of Sergio Piccirilli(2006) he was planning to kill N.Rizzuto but never got the green light from Toronto, and then Devito got into the picture, followed by Scoppa. D.Macri gets shot in 2006. Five from the Rizzuto clan get killed in 2007. This is the definition of instability in my books.


Well , for one , i didnt state any "facts", just what I thought. And there's clearly a difference of opinion when it comes to what "instabilty against the Rizzutos" mean. I'm talking about a power grab. Third, according to Lee Lamothe & The Sixth Family, the D'Amico kidnappings wasnt that, if im thinking right and thats the one where they built holding cells in their basement for Arcadi & someone else. That was over money Arcadi supposedly owed, and he referred to the D'Amicos as "cuckolds" and basically refused to pay them back. Outside of visiting the Cosenza social club, the "kidnappings" never got off the ground, again, if im remembering correctly, and things came to a halt, once all men of the Rizzuto leadership, were arrested in the Colisee bust, I will say that the D'Amico stuff was enough for Del Balso and Giordano, two well known Arcadi loyalists, to request armored vehicles and guns. Now we get into post '06, which is even when I said the instability started, your dates merely cosign that. Piccirilli never got the okay from Toronto because the Rizzuto group were still in power and working with Toronto 'Ndrines, De Vito supposedly got involved after the murder of Gervasi, who was angry at the Rizzutos over the death of his son, supposedly. Colisee happens and De Vito goes on the run, he never got a chance to act against the Rizzutos, to the best of my knowledge and he paid for his act of disloyalty. And that De Vito doc that aired in Canada about a year ago, alluded to De Vito being the one who killed Gervasi, as bullets from his gun passed through Gervasi's body, and the fatal shot was from a bullet that came from De Vitos firearm and that the order came from the Rizzuto leadership. He was also acknowledged in the Rizzuto owned Loreto funeral home, in a plaque of sorts honoring their dead. So theirs no real indication whom side De Vito was really on. Hard to call that instability against the Rizzutos to me. I havent seen anything that mentions the Scoppas acting against The Rizzutos either, physically during that timeframe, only thing I did see mentioned was the Scoppa drug pipeline. I didnt see anything about the Scoppas warring for leadership against them , again, during that timeframe. I stated time and time over why I first suspected them to be involved in the recent bloodshed, however. Maybe you can point me in the direction of some stuff which supports what youre saying in this post, in reference to The Scoppa's. I dont know enough about the Macri thing to speak on it, other than that it was also a part of the D'Amico trouble. But again, I already acknowledged '06 as the possible beginning. As cdn_wiseguy mentioned before, there was always instability against these various groups, however, not all of the animosity was always directly aimed at The Rizzutos.


Good analysis Anti, I always appreciate what you have to say on these matters.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 12:34 PM

I appreciate your knowledge and post anti but whatever may have happened 10 or 20 years ago and the relationships that were in place then are surely not static.

Just because the siderno boys supposedly got along then and had to tolerate Vito doesn't mean they continued to do so.

That meeting in 2001 was in part a power grab to consolidate operations however the criminal landscape was different then both here, in italy and the Toronto. Think the ndrangheta expansion in the last 15 years alone

Some have suggested that Montreal was a formidable family and extremely powerful...then how can you explain that it took only 2 years for the police force put everyone beyind bars and less than two years for rivals to kill Nick, Nicolo, Agostino, Paolo and friends
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 12:48 PM

If anyone knows what they're talking about, its Anti. He's never provided any reason to doubt his post. He's arguably the most knowledgeable person around this forum when it comes to Canadian Organized Crime.


And everything started After Vito was imprisoned and far away from Canada. Clearly when he was on the street, the relationships he made with other crime groups and their bosses were greatly valued by enemies and allies alike. Quite obviously, nobody had the leadership skills he had to maintain those relationships. Thats why it was "so easy" to bring them down.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 12:51 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black

Nevertheless, I still feel like the power of the 'ndrangheta in Canada is overestimated.


Magistrate Nicola Gratteri, expert on the Siderno Group, said there are hundreds of 'ndranghetisti in Canada, I believe thats true. They do have the numbers because unlike Cosa Nostra they use blood ties to make guys.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 01:01 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
If anyone knows what they're talking about, its Anti. He's never provided any reason to doubt his post. He's arguably the most knowledgeable person around this forum when it comes to Canadian Organized Crime.


And everything started After Vito was imprisoned and far away from Canada. Clearly when he was on the street, the relationships he made with other crime groups and their bosses were greatly valued by enemies and allies alike. Quite obviously, nobody had the leadership skills he had to maintain those relationships. Thats why it was "so easy" to bring them down.


Again if he was so respected and feared...would you dare kill his son and then his father in front of his daughter and mother?

You're only good to people until you're not anymore.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 01:24 PM

Originally Posted By: antimafia

Back in 2008, mostly Italian-language articles were published about the Operazione Orso Bruno investigation in Italy that targeted the Montreal Mafia leadership. Bruzzese, because of his close association with Vito Rizzuto, was charged with being a member of Cosa Nostra. On another forum, now essentially defunct, where board poster Hollander and I were members, he posted the odd English-language article about the investigation and Bruzzese's being arrested and charged. Back then, Hollander and I didn't know who Bruzzese was. Nor did we know of the criminal collaboration between the GTA Siderno Group, the Montreal Mafia, the GTA Sicilian drug traffickers like Genua and son Ignazio, and the Commisso clan in Calabria--all of this was revealed after the July 2010 culmination of the antindrangheta operation in Calabria, as the four-volume arrest warrants published two months later mentioned all the names and all the ties.


That also why I said they are all Uomini d'Onore it's not only business relations but also Mafia politics. The wedding anniversary of Paolo C untrera was a good example top guys from both societies were present.
Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 02:56 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
If anyone knows what they're talking about, its Anti. He's never provided any reason to doubt his post. He's arguably the most knowledgeable person around this forum when it comes to Canadian Organized Crime.


And everything started After Vito was imprisoned and far away from Canada. Clearly when he was on the street, the relationships he made with other crime groups and their bosses were greatly valued by enemies and allies alike. Quite obviously, nobody had the leadership skills he had to maintain those relationships. Thats why it was "so easy" to bring them down.


Anti is not the issue here and I am quite sure he is well respected on this forum and I value his opinion.
I seen others comment about Canadian Organized crime on this forum that are also very knowledgeable.So I don't see your point about making such blanket statements.
I for one and probably others on this forum,have been following Canadian organized crime since the late sixties. Knowledge is not only acquired by books or what you read on the internet. Some of us have also life experiences,friends and/or families in the know or have grown up in some of those neighborhoods.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 03:15 PM

Ciment's got a valid point......some members on the forum have grown up around people, areas, countries and neighbourhoods where these criminals and turf wars take place.

By consequence, people talk, you hear stories and trends that for whatever reason journalists don't have access too.

How many times did they mess up the origins of gangsters, thats just one example.

Although I respect the depth and knowledge of antimafias post, the past is exactly that, the past.

Present day circumstances are not what it was in 95 or even 4 years ago.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 04:47 PM

Originally Posted By: Ciment
http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/justic...ns-un-piege.php

In earlier news articles the journalist did report Callocchia was a rival but later articles mention that he was in the Rizzuto camp and was also seen by his side. The above article mentions that.


I guess he just liked switching sides. Perhaps he was allowed back into the Rizzuto fold because he wasn't directly involved in the killings. It didn't serve any purpose for Rizzuto to kill anyone who was even remotely involved in the coup, just its leaders and some of the hitters. But at the end of the day business needed to continue and Callochia proved useful.
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 05:49 PM

Originally Posted By: SinatraClub
He was also acknowledged in the Rizzuto owned Loreto funeral home, in a plaque of sorts honoring their dead. So theirs no real indication whom side De Vito was really on.


It is pretty evident that De Vito was a Rizzuto enemy. A documentary about him revealed that he aligned with Montagna and was believed to be behind the disappearance of Renda and the murder of [BadWord].

Originally Posted By: eurodave
Some have suggested that Montreal was a formidable family and extremely powerful...then how can you explain that it took only 2 years for the police force put everyone beyind bars and less than two years for rivals to kill Nick, Nicolo, Agostino, Paolo and friends


The Montreal Mafia as a whole was quite formidable but it was a loose federation of cells that Vito hold together. Under his leadership it mimicked a streamlined organization. But history showed that his family had silent enemies, and when he was sent away his successors weren't able to enact the same kind of authority over all the cells and on top of that messed things up.
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 06:52 PM

Sonny,

I agree with you that De Vito probably was against the Rizutto's even though there has been some doubt cast on this. However, I've never seen anything suggesting he was aligned with Montagna. I feel like I remember the things I've read suggesting he was working more with Desjardins/Mirarchi.

I'd be interested to see your sources on his alignment with Montagna. I'd also like to see the sources that believe he was behind the Renda disappearance and the Agostino hit... I need something to do for the next couple of days smile
Posted By: dixiemafia

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 07:20 PM

But like said, it is still very interesting that De Vito's name was on the plaque in the Loreto. I think that is the true factor that confuses everyone on the subject of him being a Rizzuto rival. I'm on the boat that he WAS against Vito, but then again why would his name be on there?
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 07:54 PM

Originally Posted By: cdn_wiseguy
Sonny,

I agree with you that De Vito probably was against the Rizutto's even though there has been some doubt cast on this. However, I've never seen anything suggesting he was aligned with Montagna. I feel like I remember the things I've read suggesting he was working more with Desjardins/Mirarchi.

I'd be interested to see your sources on his alignment with Montagna. I'd also like to see the sources that believe he was behind the Renda disappearance and the Agostino hit... I need something to do for the next couple of days smile


Here's the original article:
http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/11/29/le-caid-a-filme-sa-cavale

Youtube link with English translation:
https://youtu.be/LPifwXv7eZ0
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 12/31/16 08:20 PM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
But like said, it is still very interesting that De Vito's name was on the plaque in the Loreto. I think that is the true factor that confuses everyone on the subject of him being a Rizzuto rival. I'm on the boat that he WAS against Vito, but then again why would his name be on there?


I think it was antimafia who said that he had reason to believe that Rizzuto and De Vito had made amends before the latter's death. I agree that it doesn't seem to make sense, being that there's clear evidence that De Vito conspired against the Rizzutos yet has his name on that plaque. Perhaps he was killed by the Rizzuto group nevertheless or perhaps he was killed by his former allies for making amends with Vito, who knows.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/01/17 03:07 AM

After Vito's release from Colorado De Vito's men Facchina and Scuderi were killed.
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/01/17 03:29 AM

If Arcadi is already in a halfway house, he can probably send "pizzini" to his men.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/01/17 04:23 AM

Originally Posted By: dixiemafia
But like said, it is still very interesting that De Vito's name was on the plaque in the Loreto. I think that is the true factor that confuses everyone on the subject of him being a Rizzuto rival. I'm on the boat that he WAS against Vito, but then again why would his name be on there?





Exactly. And like I said, the De Vito doc from last year, mentions how Gervasi's body contained bullets from a firearm which matched to one De Vito had in his possession, which I believe they said was the gun he had with him in that apartment complex he had in Toronto where he was making those videos from. The documentary also said clear as day that De Vito himself was responsible for the Gervasi hit. Which led the documentary to question if he was acting on Rizzuto leadership orders. An article in reference to the doc says specifically "according to our sources, De Vito even murdered his own boss, Paolo Gervasi in 2004", it then went on to talk about how the bullets from De Vitos gun, passed through Gervasi and got lodged into the body of De Vito's accomplice, Carmelo Tommassino. This was also the same doc that claimed that De Vito sided with Montagna. It doesnt make sense, and I still don't believe its as clear cut as some would like to make it out to be, whose side De Vito may have really been on, from everything I've learned so far. Before Business Or Blood mentioning the Loreto plaque and the De Vito doc from a year ago, I was certain that De Vito did turn on the Rizzuto group. However since then, I simply dont know, and because of the doc and the Loreto plaque and the many relationships we still speculate about to this day, in regards to the Canadian underworld, I'm simply not willing to jump to such a conclusion, as to if he was definitely against the Rizzutos or if he wasn't, thats all.


And Ciment, I could be wrong, but isnt Anti from Canada as well, therefore what you said about people hearing things and researching the Canadian Mafia since the 60s, apply to him as well? Except aside from just word of mouth, he also uses actual RCMP documentation and other forms of documentation to make his posts. And I never doubted or disputed you "following Canadian OC dating back to the 60s", but you aren't the only one, and many of the discussion points, you, Sonny, myself, Cabrini, Euro, Dixie, etc, and theories and news we debate about has come from Anti and his posts, just throwing that out there. And yes, Eurodave, I understand that his post dealt with the past however its still within the discusssion as it goes to show despite what some here believe, Vito did still have allies in Toronto, Ontario which kept these groups from acting out directly against him and his leadership. And as already explained, The Rizzutos were a formidable force, thats undeniable, but as myself and others have said, his leadership skills were obviously one in a million. And his successors simply werent able to be diplomatic in the way he was and couldnt maintain those relationships and bonds, to keep their leadership position in tact and protected after he was extradited and convicted.



And heres the De Vito article I was referring to from Journal De Montreal...


Originally Posted By: "Journal de Montreal"


Le caïd a filmé sa cavale
On le voit, entre autres, réagir à la mort de ses filles, tuées par sa conjointe pendant ses années au large



Le mafieux Giuseppe De Vito s’est filmé à plusieurs reprises pendant sa cavale de quatre ans, immortalisant au passage sa peine après l’assassinat de ses deux filles par leur mère ainsi que l’annonce que sa maîtresse est enceinte.
Des dizaines de documents inédits obtenus par le Bureau d’enquête dressent un portrait jusqu’ici inconnu du chef de clan de la mafia montréalaise mort empoisonné au cyanure dans sa prison de Donnacona en 2013.

Des années plus tôt, celui qu’on surnomme «Ponytail» en raison de ses cheveux attachés en queue de cheval se trouve dans la région de Québec le 22 novembre 2006. Il est au téléphone avec sa femme quand il apprend que les policiers mènent la plus grande rafle antimafia de l’histoire canadienne.
Alors que les agents perquisitionnent son domicile de Laval, le mafieux de 40 ans est au téléphone avec sa femme Adèle Sorella qui, elle, est à l’intérieur de leur luxueuse maison. Le criminel a le choix: partir ou rester. Il part.


«Suivez-moi»
«Suivez-moi, je vais vous montrer où nous nous cachons depuis les cinq, six derniers mois», lance plus tard De Vito à la caméra. Il fait une visite guidée de l’appartement de Toronto dans lequel il se terre avec le soutien de la Ndrangheta, un puissant clan de la mafia calabraise.
Il note que le smog recouvre une bonne partie de la Ville Reine. Il met les limiers au défi de le retrouver dans les hauteurs du complexe d’habitation Le Pinnacle.
Au printemps 2009, un événement vient tout changer. Sa femme assassine leurs deux enfants de 8 et 9 ans, Amanda et Sabrina. De Vito enregistre une vidéo extrêmement déstabilisante. S’il n’a pas été possible de connaître sa date d’enregistrement, c’est bien à la mort de ses deux filles que le caïd réagit sur cette vidéo, selon nos informations.
Celui-ci, torse nu, ajuste la caméra pour que le spectateur puisse bien voir ses yeux. Ensuite, il fixe la lentille pendant plus d’une minute trente sans dire un mot. Son visage se tord de douleur sur une musique triste en arrière-plan. Sur son biceps, on peut lire les initiales de ses deux filles assassinées.
D’ailleurs, le soir du meurtre de ses filles tuées par leur mère, l’homme traqué s’était rendu chez son avocat, Me Daniel Rock.
«Il avait le poignet cassé, je ne sais pas ce qu’il avait fracassé. C’était un homme au tempérament très vif», raconte le criminaliste qui l’a rencontré à plusieurs reprises pendant sa cavale.
La grande annonce
Sur un autre document vidéo, De Vito fait une grande annonce. Après avoir perdu ses deux filles, le mafieux dit à la caméra que sa maîtresse Gina Conforti est enceinte. «Je suis gênée par la caméra», dit celle qui va lui donner des jumeaux quelques mois plus tard.



20 MEURTRES?
«Quelle vie! J’ai une longue histoire à raconter», lance Giuseppe De Vito à la caméra qui le filme dans un endroit inconnu trois jours après sa fête.
Il semble détendu, mais on ne saura jamais la suite de l’histoire que le fugitif voulait raconter.
Chose certaine, il a choisi de se rebeller contre l’organisation de l’ancien parrain de la mafia montréalaise Vito Rizzuto en s’alliant à Salvatore Montagna. Ce dernier est fraîchement débarqué de New York pour tenter d’occuper, en vain, le fauteuil du parrain.
Des sources policières croient que De Vito a participé de près ou de loin à près d’une vingtaine de meurtres, dont plusieurs ont précipité la chute du clan sicilien. C’est même lui qui serait derrière l’enlèvement du consigliere Paolo Renda et l’assassinat d’Agostino [BadWord], le numéro deux du clan Rizzuto, selon nos sources policières.
FAUSSE IDENTITÉ
Pendant sa cavale qui va s’échelonner sur quatre ans jusqu’à son arrestation en 2010, De Vito fait des allers-retours entre Toronto et Montréal. Quand il est au Québec, il habite un appartement de la rue Capri sous la fausse identité de Max Mele ou Max Melo.
IL TUE SON PATRON
Selon nos informations, De Vito aurait même assassiné son propre patron Paolo Gervasi en 2004.
Il pouvait être un tueur impitoyable. Lors de la fusillade, une balle provenant de l’arme de De Vito serait passée à travers le corps de Gervasi pour aller se loger dans l’abdomen du jeune Carmelo Tomassino, qui était complice du tueur dans cette affaire.
À la suite de cette blessure, Tomassino aurait été transporté dans un appartement, où la décision aurait été prise de le déposer devant l’hôpital Santa Cabrini pour qu’il y soit soigné.
La police croit que De Vito s’y est opposé et l’a plutôt achevé d’une balle dans la tête. Son corps aurait été brûlé, puis enterré par l’organisation mafieuse.


Posted By: Ciment

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/01/17 05:39 AM



And Ciment, I could be wrong, but isnt Anti from Canada as well, therefore what you said about people hearing things and researching the Canadian Mafia since the 60s, apply to him as well? Except aside from just word of mouth, he also uses actual RCMP documentation and other forms of documentation to make his posts. And I never doubted or disputed you "following Canadian OC dating back to the 60s", but you aren't the only one, and many of the discussion points, you, Sonny, myself, Cabrini, Euro, Dixie, etc, and theories and news we debate about has come from Anti and his posts, just throwing that out there. And yes, Eurodave, I understand that his post dealt with the past however its still within the discusssion as it goes to show despite what some here believe, Vito did still have allies in Toronto, Ontario which kept these groups from acting out directly against him and his leadership. And as already explained, The Rizzutos were a formidable force, thats undeniable, but as myself and others have said, his leadership skills were obviously one in a million. And his successors simply werent able to be diplomatic in the way he was and couldnt maintain those relationships and bonds, to keep their leadership position in tact and protected after he was extradited and convicted.

Sinatra.... If you read my statement I never said anything negative about anti mafia. So where do you come off saying such a thing. Why do you make such stupid comments ?

Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/01/17 12:59 PM

As great leader as he was everyone has an expiration date including vito and his family. That's one thing they don't seem to understand.

The criminal landscape is different now and their time to shine is done
Posted By: Hollander

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/01/17 02:46 PM

Leo Rizzuto is a smart guy big shoes to fill but maybe he can pull it off. At least for now he's relatively safe behind bars.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/01/17 03:05 PM

He may be smart but the reason there has been more blood spilled in this so called second mafia war is the Rizzuto clans reluctance to let go.

In 78-82 after the last Violi got clipped, the Cotronis diplomatically stepped aside and the rest is history.

The only surviving members of the former Montreal Cupola are behind bars.( Arcadi and Del Balso)

In 2016 alone they lost heavy hitters, made men
Posted By: Sonny_Black

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/01/17 03:12 PM

Back in 2004 De Vito was still part of the Rizzuto organization. He was caught on tape visiting the cosenza club as late as 2005, perhaps even 2006.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/01/17 03:25 PM

Originally Posted By: Sonny_Black
Back in 2004 De Vito was still part of the Rizzuto organization. He was caught on tape visiting the cosenza club as late as 2005, perhaps even 2006.


"Part" is a strong word...he paid his cut like any other Italian gangster had to, he brought his pizzo as Moreno Gallo did and many many others
Posted By: cdn_wiseguy

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/01/17 03:52 PM

You may be right eurodave, it could be over. But it's still too early for me to be as sure as you. They've spilled more blood in the so called second mafia war, but could that be that they are just weathering the storm? Everyone was wondering why they weren't retaliating very much during the first part of the war. So there was a large assumption that they were defeated. In reality they still had the man power and finances in place, but just couldn't. They had to wait for their top guys to get out of prison and analyze the landscape of who all was going after them. So long as Arcadi/Del Baso group and Liborio C's group stay aligned with Rizzuto/Sollecito, I think they still have a chance. Again, they have to wait until Arcadi/Del Baso get out, which will be soon, and have to see what happens with the charges against Leonardo/Sollecito and separate charges with Liborio.
Posted By: SinatraClub

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/01/17 03:57 PM

Originally Posted By: eurodave
He may be smart but the reason there has been more blood spilled in this so called second mafia war is the Rizzuto clans reluctance to let go.

In 78-82 after the last Violi got clipped, the Cotronis diplomatically stepped aside and the rest is history.

The only surviving members of the former Montreal Cupola are behind bars.( Arcadi and Del Balso)

In 2016 alone they lost heavy hitters, made men



Well theres still Leonardo & Stefano. And IF, a real IF, Leonardo & Stefano , Arcadi & Del Balso can put their alleged differences aside, you dont think they could at least put up a fight? And they still might very well have allies on the street, seeing as violence is still occuring and the "Rizzuto clan" hasnt seemed to be giving up just yet. And as mentioned, the [BadWord], at least Liborio, seems to be maintaining the [BadWord]/Rizzuto alliance.
Posted By: eurodave

Re: Why the mob war in Montreal may be far from over - 01/01/17 04:03 PM

Honestly I wouldn't say with certainty that they are done, I can't make such blank statements and clearly they have a sizable support group which seems to consist of second generation sons, sons who's fathers have been killed in the second mafia war.

What I'm getting to is their names and past history is carrying less and less weight over the last 4 years or so. Rivals feel empowered and are seemingly bold as of late.

That being said, anything can happen
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